Shelby  County,  Indiana

Medicine


Major Hospital
Hord Sanitarium

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The  Shelbyville  News
May 16, 1975
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Old-fashioned drugstore gives
way to modern super pharmacy
By JOAN  REHME
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[This is a wonderful historical article, including a picture of  Russell M. Fleming and some of his pharmaceutical "equipment".  Many Shelby Co names are mentioned: Leefers,  Robins,  Faivre,  Bishop,  Means,  Hoop,  Schroeder.  Mrs. Rehme obviously researched the subject, beginning her coverage with data from 1856.  Copies available through the Shelbyville-Shelby Co Library.


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, February 23, 1900
Page 1   column 2
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G O O D
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Suggestion  Made  by  Dr.
T. C. Kennedy,
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Who Sees the Necessity for a Hospital
in Shelbyville, That All
Unfortunates May Receive
Proper Attention.
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          The shooting affray in this city Wednesday, and the laying all night and part of a day on a hard cot in the noisy office of a livery stable, by  Jacob Newman,  has shown to Shelbyville the necessity of a hospital after the order of those at Columbus, Rushville and Franklin, where six or eight patients who meet with misfortune, or who, like a number of parties we could name in Shelbyville, have no home comforts, having to board at a hotel, which, of course, is no place for a sick or wounded person, can be given attention.  In speaking of this matter to-day  Dr. T. C. Kennedy  stated to a representative of  The Democrat  that he had long seen the necessity of a private hospital here, and that next week he intended visiting Frnaklin to inspect the hospital there with a view of placing in a similar one here.  Let this be encouraged.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


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CHAPTER  XIV.
The Medical Profession of Shelby County.
(By Charles A. Tindall, M.D.)

          In the preparation of this chapter I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to former county histories, Forest Hill Cemetery and  other records, a number of older citizens who have kindly given their assistance to the present physicians of Shelby county and to the tombstones, which have silently their records.  That which is given as authentic can be relied on as being fairly accurate, but in many instances no definite or accurate information could be obtained, especially about those who have been dead for many years, and those who have removed from this county and whose present location is not known.
          An effort has been made to give some account of each physician who ever lived and practiced medicine in Shelby county for any considerable length of time, but the County Clerk's register gives the names and locations of a number of physicians who were located in various parts of the county for a short time at many different periods since 1881, and doubtless there were many before that time, of whom no record is here given.  Most of them, however, did not practice in the county long enough to become thoroughly identified with the medical profession of the county, but some may have been missed who were more prominent, as the task of collecting the data has been difficult on account of there having been no early or continuous organization of the profession in the county and consequently no early records have been kept.
          The statue requiring all physicians to register with the County Clerk became operative in 1881 and the statute requiring a license in 1885.  No record of physicians prior to that time can be found in the Clerk's office, and it is presumable that none has been kept.  No careful and systematic records of births and deaths has ever been kept, excepting for a few recent years.  The older records, if they were ever kept, have been destroyed or misplaced.  In fact, it is doubtful if all births are now reported, although under the present system all deaths are probably reported.
          In looking into the history of the men who were the pioneer physicians of Shelby county one is impressed with the character of many of them.  They were intelligent, resourceful, study men, made powerful by the hardships they endured.  They were active in the development of the country and influential in their respective communities.  Many of them were well educated, not only in medicine, but in the sciences and literature and it was not uncommon for a physician of the earlier period to be able to preach a good sermon as well as practice medicine successfully.
          The relation between physician and patient was then much  closer than it now is.  The physician was not only the medical adviser, but frequently the general adviser and family friend, and when he once became the family physician he generally continued in that capacity for many years or until the death of one or the other and frequently the patient was an inheritance to a son who had taken up his father's practice.  Dr. Weelum MacLure, of Ian McLaren's creation was not an uncommon figure and even Jess, his old white mare, that he rode in all kinds of weather for so many years, could be associated in duplicate with many of Shelby county's pioneer physicians of the early days.
          The practice of medicine with the pioneer physician was difficult work' the roads were frequently all but impassable and the only mode of travel was either on foot or horse-back.  There were no bridges and it was often necessary to force the horse to swim the swollen streams.  During the sickly season (and malaria was present almost the year around) many of the physicians were in the saddle, with but little rest, both day and night, going from one patient to another over the thinly settle country.  Many times the people were poor and had but little with which to pay for medical services, although as a general rule, there were honest and paid what they could, if not in money, in horse feed, food and other articles necessary to  the physician's existence.
          My earliest recollection of a physician is that of a benevolent-looking, closely-shaven, elderly gentleman coming down the road driving a horse to a high two-wheeled sulky.  After hitching the horse he came into the house and made an examination of my father, who was sick.  He then asked for a basin, and when it was brought ordered it held under my father's arm, around which he had previously tied a band and with a spring lancet opened the vein and permitted about a quart of blood to escape into the basin.  This was some thirty-five or thirty-seven years ago, and the only time I ever witnessed a "bleeding."  This procedure has been almost entirely discarded.  The same may be said of the administration of mercury and antimony in large doses, and in fact of the entire depletive system of medicine.  A milder and more rational practice has taken the place of the earlier systems and the prevention of disease occupies a much more prominent place in the physician's duties than in the early days.
          Drainage of the soil has done more to prevent malaria (formerly call ague or chills and fever) than all of the quinine or other remedies ever given.  whether or not vaccination lessens the dangers of small-pox is a debatable question, but no one who has studied the disease will doubt but that cleanliness, ventilation and proper sanitation have very materially reduced the morality in this once dreaded disease.  Cholera almost disappears where a high order of sanitation prevails.  Typhoid fever is generally traceable to impure water or other impure foods and the poison is sometimes transmitted from one patient to another.  This disease can also be prevented by the removal of the cause, which is done by giving the proper care to foods, water and sanitary conditions.
          It is now generally conceded by the medical profession that pure air, proper food, proper exercise, and in fact, correct modes of living, together with symptomatic treatment of functional disorders gives the only hope of cure in consumption and that much can be done along these lines to prevent it.  One might go on particularizing in all diseases and the same principle prevails.
          Much experimenting along the lines of preventing diseases has been done and much good accomplished, but much yet remains to be accomplished and a more thorough study of sanitation, ventilation, foods, and of all of the laws of nature must be given; for the great white plague (consumption) claims its victims each year in appalling numbers.  Regardless of almost universal vaccination, small-pox continues to exist and frequently causes death, regardless of the use of anti-toxin diphtheria claims its scores of victims each year and the same may be said of tetanus and many other diseases which are treated by the serum theraphy[sic].  And yet so much has been accomplished in the science of healing in the past that the future gives a great promise of still greater progress.
          The progress in surgery during the last quarter of a century has been rapid.  The discovery of anesthesia in 1847 had removed from it many of its horrors, and the discovery of antiseptics a few years later, many of its dangers.  Some wonderful results have been obtained and yet much has been done in the enthusiasm of success that had better been left undone.  A lesson has been learned and a more conservative surgery is now practiced than a few years ago.  It has been said that a certain surgeon acknowledged that he had removed a plateful of practically healthy ovaries, a confession that could probably be duplicated by some others.
          Superstitions among a certain class of the laity have not all disappeared.  I have been told by credulous persons that a tea made from the bark of a peach tree when the bark had been scraped up would cure diarrhea, and that a tea made from the same bark when the bark had been scraped down would cure vomiting.  I have seen a child to which the parents had given fishing worm tea, and it is perhaps needless to say that the child died.  Even now parents of good intelligence frequently have their babies "measured" for "flesh-decay" (inanition).  This is a process in which the baby is measured with a string and the child then put through a loop made of the string and some words or prayer recited.  The "measuring" is done by some woman who imparted it shortly before death and it can be imparted to but one person by the same individual.  The physician often comes in contact with other equally ridiculous things and scarcely takes the time to remonstrate.
          The patent medicine habit is one of the evils to which the gullible afflicted is addicted.  It is claimed that each year, in the United States alone, more than seventy-five millions of dollars are spent for patent medicines.  Most of these medicines belong to two classes, one containing a large amount of alcohol or opium, or other habit-forming narcotics, or acetanilid or other dangerous heart depressants; the other class is inert or harmless, and designed only to get the money from its users.  There may be, and doubtless are, some meritorious remedies of this class, but the deleterious or inert are very largely in the majority.
          While all of the physicians of Shelby county have not been of the highest order, as would be found in any community, the large majority of them have been well educated, intelligent, gentlemanly physicians, well up to their times in literary, scientific and medical attainments.  This has been true of the physicians of the county from the beginning and is no less true now, for no better treatment for any disease either acute or chronic, no better surgery in either minor or major operations can be secured than from Shelby county physicians.
          During the first years of the history of the county the mode of travel by the physician was either on foot or on horse-back, and if the roads were now no better than they then were the same methods would yet be necessary, but the county is now traversed by excellent gravel pikes.  A little later during the dry season the two-wheeled sulky was frequently used and as the roads became better improved the buggy displaced the sulky.  At the present time the largest number of physicians use the horse and buggy, but is seems that they are rapidly being displaced by the automobile.

PHYSICIANS  OF  THE FIRST  DECADE
IN  SHELBY  COUNTY'S  HISTORY.

          Dr. Jame Kipper  is said to be the first physician who ever came to Shelby county.  He probably came as early as, or prior to, 1820.  He was siad to have been a man of very ordinary ability and very little professional knowledge although fairly successful in the treatment of the diseases prevalent at that time.
          Sylvan B. Morris, M.D., was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, November 24, 1795, and came to Shelby county and opened an office in the house of  Alexander Vanpelt, at the mouth of Conn's Creek, in 1821, or nearly two years before Shelbyville was laid out, in July of 1822.  He then immediately moved to the new town of Shelbyville, where he continued to make his home until the time of his death, September 6, 1843.  During his twenty-two years' residence in Shelby county Doctor Morris practiced medicine and was active in all of the affairs of the community.  He was a real pioneer of the county and the one pioneer physician of Shelby county, of whom we have the earliest reliable record.  He was a son of  David and  Sarah Morris, native of Pennsylvania, of Welsh descent, who moved to Warren county, Ohio, when Sylvan B. was a small boy.  Here he grew to maturity and received his education in the public schools and the Lebanon Academy and Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, from which he graduated.  Immediately after graduating from Jefferson Medical College he opened an office at Lebanon, Ohio, where he continued in the practice of his profession until he came to Shelby county in 1821.
          He was married to  Catherine Knox, in Lebanon, Ohio, May 25, 1825; she was born in Londonderry, Ireland, in 1801, and they were the parents of three children, Martha H.,  John K.,  and  Sylvan B.,  the latter still being a resident and retired merchant of this city.
          Doctor Morris was an Assessor and Land Appraiser in Shelby county, and in 1828 and 1831 he was elected to represent the county in the State Legislature.  In 1829 he was elected Clerk of Shelby county, and continued to serve the county in that capacity until February, 1843, when he resigned, only a few months before this death.
          For that early day Doctor Morris' education, both in literature and medicine, was far in advance of the time and he naturally took a prominent place among the citizens of the new county and town, and was prominent figure in all of the affairs of the community until the time of his death.  His death was deplored and his loss keenly felt by all of the citizens.
          Dr. James Wray  was born in Buncombe county, North Carolina, in 1793.  He came to Indiana and located in Shelby county, near where the Wray churches now stand in the early twenties.  For a number of years he did considerable practice in the community where he resided and also did some practice among the Indians.
          He was also a preacher and frequently preached in the neighborhood and at different locations, near where he resided.
          For a number of years before he died he occupied his time in managing a large farm which he had secured in an early day.  He died at the old home in Shelby county in 1869.
          Dr. David Tracy  was one of the very early pioneer physicians of Shelby county.  He located at the Muths Crossroads, one and one-half miles west of Morristown in the early part of the twenties.  This time is well established from the fact that he organized the first Masonic lodge ever organized in Shelby county.  This lodge, which was known as Lafayette Lodge, No. 28, Free and Accepted Masons, was organized October 5, 1825, and as no suitable hall for the meetings could be found in that locality the sessions were held in the second story of Doctor Tracy's house.  He was the first worshipful master.  The lodge continued with considerable prosperity for about three years, when it disbanded and later became Shelby Lodge, No. 28, Free and Accepted Masons.
          Here the doctor and his family lived in a two-story log house for many years.  He endured the hardships of the early pioneer physician and aside from his professional duties he was prominent in all of the affairs of the new county which he had selected for his home.  He died about 1840 or 1845, at the old home.  He had a wife, two daughters -- Sophronia  and  Mrs. Sophia Gordon, and one son, Isaac.
          Dr. Archibald Smith  came from Brookville, Indiana, in 1826, but nothing more is now known about him.
          Dr. Edward Beall  probably came to Shelbyville about 1827, and while nothing further is known positively of him an epitaph on an old tomb-stone in the oldest part of the city cemetery probably refers to him.  It is as follows:  "Sacred to the memory of  Edmund J. Beall, who departed this life March 16, 1837.  Age thirty-one years, nine months and five days."  If this surmise is correct he was twenty-one years of age when he came here.
          John Y. Kennedy, M.D., was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1792.  He received his early education in the public schools of his native county, and later attended the Lewisburg Academy, from which he graduated.  He first studied medicine under Doctor Priestly, of Sunberry, Pennsylvania, who was the discoverer of oxygen, and was one of the original investigators of that day.  He then studied for a time under Dr. John Syng Dorsey, of Philadelphia.  Doctor Dorsey was one among the most celebrated surgeons of America at that time.  After his preliminary study in medicine, he entered a medical college in Philadelphia, and after completing the prescribed course, graduated.  He was a surgeon in the War of 1812, and after the close of the war returned to Pennsylvania, where he practiced medicine and surgery for several years.  He first came to Shelby county in 1828, and located on a farm near Noah (Marion) and son after moved to Noah, where he practiced his profession for a time.  He then moved to Shelbyville, where he opened an office and continued in the practice until a few years before his death, when he retired from practice and moved to Acton, Indiana, where he lived unil he was almost ninety years old.
          Doctor Kennedy was a man of uncommon vigor of intellect, a good physician and excellent surgeon for that early day, and an influential citizen.  He was married to  Mary McKinney, also a nativeof Pennsylvania, about the close of the War of 1812, and they were the parents of a large family of children.  He died at Acton, Indiana, July 10, 1882.
          Dr. Samuel Randolph  was one of the pioneer physicians and preachers of Jackson township.  He located there probably about theyear 1829 or 1830, and remained there until about 1855.  He was preacher in the Separate Baptist chrch, and practiced medicine in the community where he resided.  He left Jackson township about 1855 and finally located at Bloomington, whree he died.  He was the grandfather of  Dr. Daniel F. Randolph, who is now located at Waldron.  He had a wife and a large family of perhaps ten or twelve children.  He claimed to be able to cure the then prevailing malady known as milk-sickness.  He was among the first settlers of Jackson township, and took an active part in everything pertaining to its welfare.
          Dr. William Silcox  was born in Scotland and emigrated to this country at an early day.  He graduated from a medical college in Baltimore.  He came to Shelby county and located at Freeport about 1830, and continued in the practice of medicine there from that time until his death about 1845.  About 1838 he was married to  Miss Lucena Burtch, who survived him, and a few years after his death was married to  Morris Pierson, father of  Dr. W. M. Pierson, now of Morristown.  He was prominent in all of the enterprises of the community, and largely instrumental in the building of the mill at Freeport in an early day.

DECEASED  PHYSICIANS  WHO  PRACTICED  MEDICINE  IN
SHELBY  COUNTY  FROM  1830  TO  THE  PRESENT  TIME.

          Dr. James M. Adams  was born in Scott county, Kentucky, January 15, 1820.  He was the eldest in a family of eleven children born to  Isaac and  Nancy (Polk) Adams.  They came to Indiana in 1825 and located in what is now Hancock county, where they continued to live until 1838,when they moved to Shelby county.  He moved with his parents to Rush county in 1841, where they remained for three years, when they again moved to Shelby county.  He received his education in the public schools and by study at home until he was able to teach.  In 1841 he was married to  Miss Phoebe J. Johnson, of Rush county, and from then until 1850 he followed farming.  In 1850 he commenced the study of medicine under  Dr. Hiram Comstock, and continued under him until 1853, when he entered the Ohio Medical College, where he took a course of lectures.  He then located at Pleasant View, where he practiced for a few months, when he moved to Freeport, where he continued in the practice for fourteen years.  In 1867 he moved to Wabash county and practiced for seven years, when he returned to Shelby county and located at Marion (Noah), where he continued in the practiced until his death, September 16, 1894.
          Mrs. Adams died June 18, 1864, and the following December he was married to Miss Belinda Johnson.  He was the father of thirteen children, eight by his first wife and five by the last.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for more than fifty years, and a licensed exhorter in that church for more than thirty years.  He was always active in the Sunday school and paid especial attention to the music.
          David Hunter Adams  was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1830, and graduated from the Ohio Medical Collee about 1866.  He practiced medicine prior to his graduation at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, for for or five years, and came to Shelbyville where he practiced until the war broke out, when he enlisted as surgeon in the army and remained three years.  He came to Shelbyville in 1856, and after returning from the army located at Fairland, where he practiced for several years.  He then moved to Edinburg where he practiced until a few years before his death, which occurred there June 7, 1895.  He was married March 11, 1858, to  Miss Allie J. Morris, and to their union six children were born.  Two live here, Miss Kate and  Frank.
          Dr. Joseph Ardere  was located near the Copeland Mills on Flatrock for a few years about 1848.  He boarded at Copeland's until he was married to  Miss Wooley, when they moved to Hartsville, where he died some years later.
          Walter K. Baylor, M.D., came from Decatur county, Indiana, where he had a large practice, to Shelby county, about 1880.  He immediately located on a farm in Noble township, where he continued in a small practice until his death about twenty-five years later.  Although of rough exterior he had a kind disposition, and was considered by many to be a good physician.
          He was married in early life and his wife died six months later, and after her death he always lived alone.
          Dr. John W. Belk  was born November 28, 1818, and died at Marietta, Shelby county, Indiana, July 14, 1853.  He located at Marietta during the latter part of the thirties, and continued in the active practice there until the time of his death.  He married  Miss Martha Miller, who survived him.  His remains were buried in the old city cemetery, of Shelbyville, and these dates were taken from the tomb-stone.
          Lovell M. Bruce  was born in New Castle, Kentucky, January 8, 1808.  He graduated from an Eclectic Medical College either at Cincinnati, or Louisville, about 1839.
          He practiced medicine for a time at New Castle, Bedford, Louisville, and Mount Sterling, Kentucky, and about 1860 came to Shelby county and located at Mount Auburn in Jackson township, where he continued in an extensive practice until the spring of 1872, when he, with his family moved to Shelbyville.  He left Mount Auburn and came to Shelbyville on account of poor health, and never had an extensive practice in Shelbyville.  He continued to live here, however, until the time of his death, October 6, 1873.  His death was caused by a severe cold taken while making a midnight ride to see a charity patient in Jackson township during the winter of 1872.  From this time he went into a decline and never again regained his health.  He was the son of  Andrew J. Bruce, a Kentucky slave owner.  Doctor Bruce, however, was a strong Union man, and this was the principal reason he left his native state and came to Indiana, when the war cloud was hanging heavily over the country.  He was married July 29, 1847, to  Miss Eliza J. McHenry, of Vevay, Indiana, who died in Shelbyville, Indiana, November 25, 1896.  To their union four children were born:  Mrs. Georgia Rinehart, who is the wife of City Councilman  John RinehartMrs. Ada Deitzer, who was the wife of County Clerk  J. H. Deitzer, now deceased;  Clarence R. Bruce, and the late  Don C. Bruce, ex-City Marshal.
          Dr. Harvey Benham  practiced medicine at Flatrock, Shelby county, for a number of years along about 1860.  After the death of  Doctor Treon  he purchased the old Treon homestead and moved there, where he continued in the practice for some years.  He finally moved to Richmond, where he died some years later.  He was married to the widow of  Martin Warner.
          Daniel Booher, M.D., was born in Shelby county, Indian, August 24, 1869.  He received his literary education in the public schools of the county.  He was raised on a farm and employed himsellf at that occupation until he was twenty years of age, when he entered the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, where he graduated in 1894.  He then located at Marion (Noah), having purchased the office of  Doctor Bowlby  and practiced medicine in that vicinity until about 1900, when he was compelled to change climate on account of failing health.  He then went to Colorado and practiced medicine until his death, which occurred December 20, 1905.  His death was caused by lung trouble.  His remains were brought back home and buried in Forest Hill cemetery.  He was married to  Miss Maggie Peters  September 13, 1893.  They had no children.  He was an enthusiastic member of Chillon Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and was buried under the auspices of that lodge.
          Joseph Bowlby, M.D., was born in Rush county, Indiana, February 17, 1854.  He was the youngest in a fmily of eight children born to  Dennis and  Eliza A. (Cregar) Bowlby, who were natives of New Jersy.  They moved to Rush county at an early day and removed to Shelby county in 1869, where they resided until their death.  He worked on a farm in the summer and attended the public schools in the winter until he was enough advanced in his studies to teach school, which he did in Rush county for six terms, devoting his time to farming during the intervening summers.
          He commenced the study of medicine with  Dr. Lot Green, of Rushville, in 1880, and continued to study with him and at the Ohio Medical College until he graduate in 1883.  After graduating he located at Marion (Noah), Shelby county, where he continued in the active practice until 1894, when he moved to Shelbyville and opened an office where he continued in practice until his death, June 28, 1906.
          He was a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics he was a Republican, and in all of them he was actice.  April 28, 1885, he was married to  Miss Mary E. Yearling.  He left besides his widow two daughters, Bertha and Bernice.
          Dr. E. T. Bussell  came here to practice medicine about 1845 and continued in the practice for a number of years.  He was here during the cholera epidemic of 1850, and treated many patients during this epidemic.  He was quite a musician and an inventor of no mean ability.  He had a number of patents, some of which were manufactured rather extensively.  He had large family of children.
          Frank Gillespie Campbell, M.D., who was the son of  Thomas and  Bridgett (Gillespie) Campbell, both natives of  Ireland, was born in Johnson county, Indiana, February 27, 1869.  He received his education in the public schools and in Franklin College, where he attended four years.  He then spent three years in the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, where he graduated in 1894.  After graduating he immediately located at Shelbyville for the practice of medicine, and continued until the time of his death, October 2, 1908.  He was an active member of the Eagles and Elks lodges.  He was never married, but resided with his mother.
          Dr. G. M. Collins  practiced medicine at Noah (Marion), Shelby county, for a number of years along about 1870.  He finally left there and went to the northern part of the state, where he died some years later.
          Hiram Comstock, M.D., was born in Madison county, Ohio, March 17, 1820.  His father, James Comstock, was a native of Vermont, and his mother, Chloe (Bull) Comstock, was a native of Connecticut.  They came to Ohio at an early day and lived first in Madison county, then moved to Hamilton county, where Hiram grew to manhood and finally moved to Montgomery county.  It was here that Hiram commenced the study of medicine under the instructions of his father, who was a physician, and continued his studies until he was qualified to practice.  He commenced the practice of his profession at Greenfield, Indiana, in 1843, and continued there until 1846, when he first came to Shelby county and located at Freeport.  After practicing at Freeport for a year or two he entered the Ohio Medical College and continued his studies there until he graduated in March, 1849.  After graduating he resumed his practice at Freeport, and continued to practice there until 1855, when he removed to Marietta, this county.  Here he enjoyed a large practice for many years and in this neighborhood he continued to live until the time of his death, March 11, 1888.
          He was a member of the Methodist church and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in politics a Republican.  He was married three times, first to  Rebecca J. Mills in 1843, who died in 1851; then to  Nancy E. Morgan  in 1852.  His second wife died in 1856, and in 1857 he wa again married, this time to  Lucy A. McCrea, who survived him two weeks.  He was the father of six children, three each by his first and last wife.
          Doctor Crew came here from Ohio, and was in partnership for a few years with  Dr. J. C. Slocum.  After the dissolution of the partnership he went back to Ohio and died there some years later.
          E. E. Crippen, M.D., was born in New York, July 23, 1833.  He graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1857.  He located at Blue Ridge (Cynthiana) for the practice of medicine in 1885, and remained there for about three years, when he removed to Milroy, Rush county, where he died a short time after.
          Dr. Culbertson practiced medicine here for a few years along about 1860.
          Dr. Cull is mentioned by a former Shelby county history, but nothing more could be learned of him.
          Dr. Richard Cummins was another of the physicians who practiced medicine in Shelby county during the thirties.  He came here, probably about 1830, and died here some time near 1840, while yet in the prime of life.  He was married to a daughter of John Walker, his wife being a sister to the wife of Doctor Teal and Doctor McCoy. He lived on the southwest corner of Harrison and Pennsylvania streets. He had no children. In politics he voted with the Whigs.  He was one of the leading physicians of that day, and had a fair share of the practice and stood well in his community.
          Samuel Davis Day, M.D., who was prominent in the medical profession in Shelby county for almost a half century, was born in Dalton, Massachusetts, March 2, 1811, of sturdy New England Puritan stock.  His parents were Amasa and Hannah Day, who were natives of Connecticut, but who in early life settled near Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where they spent the remainder of their lives.  Of these parents Samuel D. was the third in a family of five children, three sons and two daughters.  During the winter months he attended the district schools of his neighborhood, which were generally taught by the students of Williams College, who were fine classical scholars, thus giving advantage to the pupils of the district schools.  During the summer months he attended the Pittsfield Academy until he arrived at the age of fourteen. By this time he had become proficient in the different branches of the English language as well as a good Latin scholar. In 1824 he entered the office of his brother, Dr. Jonathan Day, of Syracuse, New York, where he remained until 1830, when he entered Berkshire Medical College, from which he graduated in December, 1831. Early in 1832 an effort was made to prevent the spread of cholera in New York, and Doctor Day was appointed quarantine physician and located at French Creek on the St. Lawrence river, where he remained until August of that year, when his brother, Doctor Jonathan, died of cholera.  He then returned to Syracuse to settle his brother's estate and remained until 1834.  The next two years he spent in Ohio as a traveling salesman, selling surgical instruments. In 1836 he came to St. Omer, Decatur county, but soon moved to Milroy, Rush county.  He remained there but a short time, when he moved to Wilmington, Dearborn county, where he remained until his 1838.  He located in Shelbyville in 1838, where he remained until his death July 23, 1893.  He continued active in the practice of medicine in Shelbyville for forty years, or until 1878, when he retired from active practice on account of failing health.  Doctor Day always enjoyed an extensive practice and took an active interest in all public affairs.  Although the fees received for medical services at that time were never large, he accumulated considerable property and lived in comfort during his declining years.  He was an enthusiastic Democrat and active in politics, although a strong Union Supporter during the war.  On October 28, 1847, he was married to Miss Jane Thompson, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was a cousin of ex-Vice President Thomas A. Hendricks.  No children were ever born to them.  They were active members of the Presbyterian church.
          Doctor Davidson is mentioned as having been located in Shelbyville in the practice of medicine along about the thirties, by a former Shelby county history, but as nothing can be learned about him it is probable that he was not here long.
          Dr. Richard Depew lived in St. Paul, but did a large practice in the southeast corner of Shelby county for many years.  He left there about 1888, and went to Indianapolis, where he died some years later.


          David S. McGaughey, M.D., was born in Hamilton county, Indiana, October 24, 1809.  [based solely on the date, it is more likely to have been Hamilton Co, OH-pmf.]  He was the son of David and Mary (Lytle) McGaughey, the father being a native of Ireland, and the mother of New Jersey. He received his literary education in the public schools and at the age of twenty-four began the study of medicine with Doctor Guett, of Montgomery, Ohio, and later graduated from the Ohio Medical College. He commenced the practice of medicine at Morristown, Shelby county, Indiana, in 1835, and continued in the active practice there for almost half a century, or until shortly prior to his death, which occurred at Morristown, March 17, 1884. During the war he was detailed by Governor Morton as hospital physician, and acted in that capacity at the battle of Shiloh. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics voted the Republican ticket. He was the organizer of a class of singers known as the Old Missouri Harmony Singers, which began about 1840, and continued singing at frequent intervals for many years, and at annual meetings until the doctor's death. After his death the annual meetings have continued, being led by Dr. James M. Adams until his death, and since that time by others.  These meetings have always been occasions of much importance in Morristown and vicinity. He was married twice, first in 1838 to Miss Amelia Handy, who died in 1874, and then in 1876 to Miss Martha Jane Handy, a sister of his former wife, who survived the doctor. He had four children, all born to his first wife.  There were two sons and two daughters, the sons both having been educated for the medical profession. Doctor McGaughey was one of the real pioneer physicians of Shelby county, and held a position of much influence in his community for years.  He enjoyed a large practice and was a successful physician and at the time a successful business man and owned much valuable property.
          Dr. William W. McCoy also practiced medicine in Shelby county during the thirties. He probably came during the early thirties and left some time during the forties. An old history of the First Presbyterian church of Shelbyville shows that he was a member of the board of trustees of that church in 1839, when the first church of that denomination in Shelbyville was built. He also married a daughter of John Walker, she being a sister to the wife of Doctor Cummins and Doctor Teal.  He lived on the northwest corner of Mechanic and Tompkins streets. He had a good practice and was one of the leading physicians of that day. He left here and died some years later.
          William Gaston McFadden, M.D., was born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, on April 22, 1834. He was of Scotch-Irish descent, and came with his parents, Hugh and Isabelle McFadden, to Shelby county when he was four years of age, and here he made his home until his death, which occurred at Jacksonville, Florida, where he had gone to spend the winter, on April 20, 1907.  He received his preliminary education in the public schools of Shelby county, and then spent three years in Franklin College, after which he completed his literary education in Hanover College.  He commenced his medical education by spending two years in the Meical Department of the University of Michigan, and then attended the Jefferson Medical College from which institution he graduated in 1870.  He began practice, however, in Shelby county, near Boggstown, in 1856, and moved to Shelbyville in 1875, where he continued in the active practice until he retired, a few years before his death.  For more that forty years he enjoyed a large practice, and at the time of his death he was in possession of much valuable property.  Soon after the war of the Rebellion broke out he was commissioned surgeon, and entered the field in that command.  During the second day of the battle of Chickamauga, he, together with his nurses, was captured by the enemy.  He was permitted to care for his wounded for ten days, after which he was sent to Libby prison where he was kept in close confinement for three months.  He was then released and again immediately joined his regiment and remained the service until the close of the war.  Soon after moving to Shelbyville he was married to Miss Martha Sullivan, a native of Miami county, Ohio, and to this union two children were born. Dr. Walter C. McFadden, of Shelbyville, and Mrs. Edna Smith, of Rushville.
          George McGaughey, M.D., was born in Morristown, Indiana, August 11, 1840.  He was a son of Dr. David S. McGaughey, who settled at Morristown, in 1835.  He graduated from the Ohio Medical College about 1862, and from that time until his death he practiced medicine at Morristown, excepting about three years, when he was located elsewhere.  He was married in 1866 to  Miss Sarah Elizabeth Wolf, who is now living at Morristown.  They became the parents of two children.  Doctor McGaughey died at Morristown, June 6, 1880.

          Isaac Neal Tindall, M.D., was born in Shelby county, Indiana, on a farm four miles south of Shelbyville, August 25, 1854.  He attended the public schools of the county during the winter months, and worked on his father's farm during the summer until he completed the course of instruction given in the common schools and then entered the high school of Shelbyville, where he remained until he graduated in 1876.  Immediately after graduating from the high school, he entered the office of Dr. John W. Parrish, M.D., at Shelbyville, and commenced the study of medicine.  The following winter he entered the Eclectic Medical institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he continued his studies until he graduated in 1879.  After graduating from the medical college he opened an office for the practice of his profession in Shelbyville, Indiana, where he continued until his death February 2, 1882.  Although his professional career was short, he had already built up a large practice and gave promise of becoming one of the leading physicians of Shelbyville.  His father and mother, George A. and Sallie A. (McCann) Tindall, were native of Kentucky, and came to Shelby county early in the history of the county.
          Doctor Toliver practiced medicine at Copeland's Mill in Noble township for several years some time during the fifties.
          Dr. Andrew J. Treon, was another of the pioneer physicians who practiced medicine in Jackson township, Shelby county, Indiana, in an early day, proably from 1841 to 1860.  He was talented and a good physician, and had many warm friends.  He was clear-headed and a good thinker, and influential member of the St. George Lutheran church.  He died at the old homestead on the farm where he had lived for many years, and was buried at Sang Hill cemetery.
          Martin Van Buren Updegraff was born in Shelby county, Indiana, in 1842.  He received his early education in the public schools and later attended lectures at the Ohio Medical College, where he graduated about 1862. He then entered the army as assistant surgeon.  After the close of the war he located at Waldron, Indiana, for the practice of medicine and continued there until his death, February 25, 1880. He was married to a Miss Miller, of New Albany, Indiana.  They had no children.  In politics he was a Republican.
          Robert Russell Washburn, M.D., was born near Laurel, Indiana, March 12, 1833. His father and mother, who were native of Kentucky, were moving from Kentucky to Rush county, Indiana, and it was while on this trip en route to their new home that Robert Russell first saw the light of day, having been born in a covered wagon which they were using as a means of conveyance. During the years of his youth he worked on a farm and commenced to learn the carpenter's trade under his father. He had no school advantages, having attended school in a little log school-house in Rush county for about thirty days, but by studying at home he received all the literary education he ever had. He commenced the study of medicine in the office of Doctor Mauzy, at Rushville, in 1850, where he remained until 1853, when he located at Blue Ridge, Shelby county, Indiana. He remained in practice here for three or four years when he removed to Waldron, where he continued in the practice of medicine until the time of his death, November 10, 1900. During nearly all of the time of his residence at Waldron he also conducted a drug store. During the winters of 1883-84 and 1884-85 he attended lectures at the Indiana Medical College, where he graduated in the spring of 1885. For almost a half century Doctor Washburn practiced in Shelby county and saw many marvelous changed take place, not only in the practice of medicine, but in improvements in the county in every respect. In 1853 he was married to Miss Sarah E. Shultz, of Rushville, and to this union seven children, three boys and four girls were born.
          Dr. Albert G. Webb, who was a son-in-law of Major John Hendricks, began the practice of medicine in Shelbyville, along about 1840. He was well educated and a successful physician. He was active in the affairs of the city and soon built up a good practice. Although yet a young man his useful career was cut short by his death from cholera, in 1850. The death of such a popular physician from that dreaded disease was so much ofa shock to the then little city of Shelbyville that on the following day many of the inhabitants left the city to remain away until the danger was passed.


          William M. Pierson, M.D.  Born in Greenfield, Indiana, August 10, 1850.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College 1874, and the Medical Department of Butler University 1876.  Practiced at Fountaintown until 1903.  Since then at Morristown.  Married June 6, 1878, to Etoile B. Mutz.  They have three daughters and one son.
          Daniel F. Randolph, M.D., was born March 27, 1854, in Owen county, Indiana.  He graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1888.  Practiced at Indianapolis and Newbern, Indiana, until 1890. Practiced at Waldron since 1890.  He was married December 26, 1883, to Miss Alice M. Conover.  One child.
          J. H. S. Riley, M.D.  Born in Decatur county, Indiana, April 11, 1878.  Graduated at Medical College of Indiana, 1904.  Practiced in Decatur county from 1904 to 1908.  Practiced at Bengal, Shelby county, since 1908.
          Thomas R. Rubush, M.D.  Born October 2, 1863, at Indianapolis, Indiana.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College September 29, 1879.  Practiced at London, Shelby county, since 1879.  Married September 29, 1880, to Miss Emma Hahn.  Eight children, five living.
          William Austin Schooley, M.D.  Born March 9, 1865, in Dearborn county, Indiana.  Graduated from the Ohio Medical College in 1888.  Practiced at Sulphur Hill, Shelby county, Indiana, since.  Married June 18, 1890, to Miss Frances True.  Six children.
          W. T. Shrout, M.D.  Born May 15, 1845, in Nichols county, Kentucky.  He first graduated from an Eclectic College in Richmond, Virginia, and in 1894 from the Eclectic College of Physicians and Surgeons of Indianapolis. Practiced in Shelby county since about 1880.  Now at Waldron.  Married August 22, 1867, to Miss Virginia Neal.  They have five children living and two dead.  One son a physician.
          John W. Snider, M.D. Born April 26, 1845, in Shelby county, Indiana.  Graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago 1870.  Practiced at Fairland thirty-two years.  Married August 24, 1875, to Miss Mary Laws.  Three children.
          Stephen Lewis Strickler, M.D.  Born in Shelby county, Indiana, August 22, 1853.  Attended Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1878 and 1879.  Graduated Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, 1883.  Practiced at Boggstown since 1879.
          J. F. Taylor, M.D., was born December 8, 1844, in Jefferson county, Indiana.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, 1878.  Married April 21, 1885, to Miss Hannah V. Henry, who died April 18, 1887.
          M. M. Wells, M.D. Born in Orange county, Indiana, February 25, 1871.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College 1901.  Practiced at Fairland since graduation, excepting eighteen months as interne in hospital.  Married March 2, 1904, to Zella  [really Della  (Kitty) -- see Bob Gordon's note below*]  Gordon.  One son [Gordon -- BG], deceased.
          Edward Wertz, M.D., was born July 19, 1876, in Shelby county, Indiana.  He graduated from the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1900.  Practiced at Shelbyville, Indiana, a short time, and since at Flatrock.  Married July 22, 1897, to Miss Lulu Ford.  Two children.
          R. A. Wiltshire, M.D.  Born in Ohio.  Graduated from Cincinnati College in 1896.  Practiced at Gwynneville since.  Married March 30, 1900, to  Alice Buell.  Two children.

PHYSICIANS WHO HAVE PRACTICED MEDICINE IN SHELBY COUNTY,
BUT NOW RESIDE IN OTHER LOCATIONS.

          Emil Carl Aurin, M.D., graduated from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1897.  He located at Marietta in 1898, and remained about one year.  He is now practicing in Cedar Rapids, Michigan.
          Dr. Marcellus M. Adams, who was born in 1836, practiced medicine at Freeport for a few years along about the sixties.  He now resides in Greenfield.
          Ella Blackburn, M.D., was born in Ohio.  Graduated from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1898.  Practiced at Shelbyville from 1900 to 1904.  Now physician in a sanitarium at Palmyra, Wisconsin.
           Frank B. Black, M.D., who is a graduate of the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, of the class of 1886, came from the southern part of the State of Bengal, Shelby county, in 1889, and remained in the active practice there until 1904.  He is now located in Ohio.
          Dr. J. E. Curtis, a graduate of the Kentucky School of Medicine, practiced at Waldron for a short time about 1890.  He is now located at Greensburg.
          James A. Comstock, M.D., was born in Hancock county, January 8, 1844.  Graduated from Rush Medical College in 1865, from the Ohio Medical College in 1867.  Practiced at Marietta from 1867 to 1889.  Moved to Greenfield in 1889, where he now resides.  He was married September 19, 1872, to Miss Mary Anderson, and they have had three children.
          Dr. J. W. Clubb practiced medicine at Fairland for several years previous to 1900, when he removed to Kentucky, where he is now practicing.
          Dr. J. W. Carney practiced medicine at Ray's Crossing for several years along about 1900.  He is now located in Bartholomew county.
          Dr. Charles J. Cook practiced medicine at Gwynneville from about 1894 to 1904.  He is now in the active practice at Indianapolis.
          John H. Dearman, M.D., was born and raised in the northern part of the county.  He graduated from the Cincinati [sic] College of Medicine about 1887.  He then located at Brookfield, where he continued in the practice of medicine until about 1900, when he moved to Action, where he yet resides.
--------------------
* Dr. Milton Wells was married to my grandfather's sister; her name was  Della (Kitty) Gordon,  not Zella Gordon.  I can provide a photo of  Kitty and their son Gordon Wells (who died), as well as a photo of Dr. Wells.  I think I even have one of  Dr. Wells in his WWI uniform. -- Bob Gordon
** [continued below]
Chadwick's History of Shelby County, Indiana by Edward H. Chadwick, B.A., assisted by
well known local talent, B.F. Bowen & Co, Pub: Indianapolis, IN, 1909, pp 208-9; 220-1; 228-9; 236-237.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


PHYSICIANS WHO ARE AT THE PRESENT TIME
PRACTICING MEDICINE IN SHELBYVILLE.


Dr. O. L. Adams, M.D., born April 8, 1871, graduated at Indiana Medical College in 1894; Manhattan School of Optics in 1908.  He practiced in Shelbyville from 1894 to 1896, then he was in the drug business until 1907.  His practice is limited eye, ear, nose and throat.  Practiced specialty since 1908.  Married October 17, 1894, to  Miss Edith Gordon.

Dr. Adam Quincy Baird, born January 8, 1836, in Wabash County, Illinois.  Attended Miami Medical College in 1874-75.  Practiced in Illinois from 1875 to 1896.  Located at Smithland, Shelby County, 1896, and at Shelbyville in 1897.  At Shelbyville since.  Married twice, first in 1866, then in 1875 to  Amanda Wallace.  Two children by first wife, six by second.

Dr. Laura Carter, M.D., born February 22, 1867, near Versailles, Indiana.  Graduated from the Laura Memorial Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1902.  Practiced in Shelbyville, Indiana, since 1904.

Robert E. Clark, M.D., born in Switzerland County, Indiana, October 9, 1853.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1891.  Practiced at several locations before coming to Shelbyville.  Located at Shelbyville in 1901.  Practiced here since.  Married in January 1874, to Miss Eva Phillip.  Six children.

Henry M. Connelly, M.D., born September 20, 1850, in Coles County, Illinois.  Graduated from Hartsville College in 1873.  Graduated from Indiana Medical College in 1882.  Practiced at Flat Rock until 1903, since then at Shelbyville.  Married December 22, 1874 to  Sarah J. Powell.  One son and one daughter.  

Morris Drake, M.D., born March 5, 1856, in Putnam County, Indiana.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1881.  Practiced in Shelbyville since.  Married in 1889 to  Miss Minnie Hanley, now deceased.  Five children, three of who are living.  Married to  Miss Rose Zoble  in 1907.

Charles E. Dunn, M.D., was born in Brown County, Ohio, May 2, 1862.  Attended Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1894.  Married twice.  Present wife was  Miss Sarah DeBaun.  Practiced in Marietta until 1896, and in Shelbyville since 1897.  He has two children.

George W. Fleming, M.D., was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, November 22, 1843.  He graduated from Washington and Jefferson College in 1865, Medical Department University of Michigan in 1867, Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1868.  He was married May 28, 1879 to  Mrs. Laura Gorges Wilson, who died September 31, 1908.  He has practiced in Shelbyville since 1868.

R. M. Floyd, M.D., was born May 7, 1846.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1869.  Practiced a year before coming to Shelbyville.  Practiced in Shelbyville from 1878 to 1880, and since that time has been in the drug business.  Married August 11, 1868 to  Miss Maggie Lytle.  He has had three children, all of whom are dead.

J. R. Garner, M.D., was born April 25, 1852, in England.  Graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, Illinois, in 1890.  Practiced since March 1909, in Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married in 1886 to  Minerva C. Martin, now deceased.  One child living.

Thomas G. Green, M.D. was born in Arlington, Rush County, Indiana, April 6, 1865.  He graduated from Louisville Medical College of Louisville, Kentucky, in 1889, and has practiced in Shelbyville, Indiana, since.  Married June 7, 1899, to  Rhoda Gary.

J. R. Jenkins, M.D., was born in Switzerland County, Indiana, February 9, 1842.  Graduated at Miami Medical College in 1879.  Practiced at Waldron, Indiana, fourteen years, then at several other locations.  Again located at Shelbyville in 1906, and has practiced here since.  Married to  Miss Mariah Penn in 1872.  They have had four children.

Thomas C. Kennedy, M.D., was born June 8, 1862, at Shelbyville, Indiana.  Graduated from Kentucky School of Medicine in 1883, since then has practiced in Shelbyville.  He was married May 25, 1885 to  Miss Bell M. Coffin, of Henry County, Indiana.  They have had two children.  One dead.  France M. still living.  Does general surgery.

Samuel Kennedy, M.D., was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, March 16, 1867.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College in 1891.  Married to Miss Katherine Leefers, April 20, 1908.

William H. Kennedy, M.D., was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, February 15, 1877.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College in 1903, and since then has practiced at Shelbyville.  Married April 14, 1906 to  Miss Effie E. Burnham of Chicago.  One son.

B. G. Keeney, M.D., was born at Patriot, Indiana, August 23, 1876.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1902 and since then has practiced in Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married to  Ethel Adams June 1, 1905.  They have one child, Edmund L.

J. N. Lucas, M.D., was born at Butler County, Ohio, March 1, 1846.  Graduated Antioch College in 1869.  Graduated at Pulte Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1873.  Practiced at Shelbyville three years, then at Cambridge City seven years.  Located at Shelbyville again in 1883, where he has practiced ever since.  Married to  Miss Margaret Powell in 1880.  They have three sons:  Horace,  Orton E.  and  Frank P.

Walter C. McFadden, M.D., was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, December 14, 1878.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1902, and since then has practiced in Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married to  Margaret Schroeder, October 9, 1902.  They have two daughters,  Marion  and  Alice.

Dr. R. B. Minnis was born at Buffalo, New York, February 18, 1871.  Graduated from the Still College of Osteopathy, of Des Moines, Iowa in 1904.  Practiced at Terre Haute for a short time, and since at Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married February 18, 1891 to  Mary J. Bane.  They have one daughter, Helen.

James Willard, M.D., was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, December 16, 1859.  Graduated at Central Normal College, Danville, Indiana, 1884.  Indiana Medical College in 1896.  Practiced at Fenns, Shelby County, Indiana, from 1896 to 1904.  Practice at Shelbyville since 1904.  

Henry E. Phares, M.D., was born in Shelby County, Indiana, July 1, 1870.  Graduated at Hospital College of Medicine at Louisville, 1897.  Practiced at Morristown from 1897 until 1901, and since then at Shelbyville.  Married April 26, 1899 to  Miss Gertrude Carney.  They have one daughter, Frances.

Frank E. Ray, M.D., was born in Brandywine Township, Shelby County, Indiana, October 16, 1865.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1890.  Member medical staff at Central Insane Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana for six years.  Following that time he practiced at Fairland, Indiana for four years and since that time at Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married  Allie Davis in 1897.
[Note from Bob Gordon:  I have a photo of  Dr. Ray at Fairland; he delivered my grandfather in 1884.  The photo is a really neat picture of Dr. Ray in a Top Hat.]

L. C. Sammons, M.D., was born at Vandalia, Michigan, December 1, 1876.  Graduated from Homeopathic Medical College of Missouri, at St. Louis, in 1899, and since then has practiced at Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married July 25, 1899 to  Satie C. Lilly.  One child, deceased.

J. B. Stewart, M.D., was born in Switzerland County, Indiana, March 8, 1843.  Graduated at Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery in 1866.  Practiced in Dearborn County, Indiana until 1878, from then to 1900 at Marietta, Shelby County, and since then at Shelbyville.  Now spends part of his time at Indianapolis.  Married twice.  Two children.

Charles A. Tindall, M.D., was born in Shelby County, Indiana, August 8, 1867.  Graduated from Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1887.  Practice in Shelbyville since 1887.  Married November 17, 1887 to  Miss Bertha J. Michelson.  Two sons:  Paul R., age twenty, who is a medical student in Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, and  Carl A., age fifteen.

W. W. Tindall, M.D., was born in Shelby County, Indiana, September 9, 1876.  Graduated from Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1903.  Practiced at Carthage, Indiana, for three years following, and since that time at Shelbyville, Indiana.  Married in 1903 to  Carrie F. Phares.  One child, William R.

Dr. G. G. Winter was born in Germany, August 22, 1841.  Educated in Germany.  Located at Shelbyville, Indiana, December 1869.  Married June 25, 1873 to  Rosa Theobald.  Three sons,  Carl,  Paul,  and  Emil, and one child dead.  He has practiced in Shelbyville more or less since 1869.

PHYSICIANS WHO ARE AT PRESENT TIME PRACTICING MEDICINE
IN SHELBY COUNTY, OUTSIDE OF SHELBYVILLE:


Frank E. Bass, M.D.  Born July 26, 1881, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from Medical College of Indiana, 1903.  Practiced at Morristown since.  Married May 24, 1904 to  Miss Bertha Moore.  They have one child.

W. R. Bentley, M.D.  Born July 20, 1851, in Decatur County, Indiana.  Attended Pulte Homeopathic Medical College of Cincinnati in 1883 two terms.  Graduated from Chicago Homeopathic College, 1886.  Practiced at Morristown, Indiana, continually since 1886.

Byron H. Boone,  M.D.  Born May 29, 1865.  Graduated at Kentucky School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, 1894.  Practiced at Boggstown since.  Married to  Miss Alice Hanly.  Two children.

W. H. Cohee, M.D.  Born April 29, 1867, in Bartholomew County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1898.  Practiced at Marietta since.  Married November 11, 1900 to  Grace L. Griffith.

Walter M. Ford, M.D.  Born Indiana, November 16, 1862, in Kentucky.  Graduated from the University of Louisville in 1877.  Practiced at Mt. Auburn since.  Married March 21, 1878 to Miss Katherine Emrick.  They have four children living and two dead.

George Isham Inlow, M.D.  Born in Blue Ridge, Shelby County, Indiana, August 9, 1874.  Graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine, 1897.  Practiced at Ray's Crossing from 1897 to 1900.  Since 1900 at Blue Ridge in partnership with his father, I. W. Inlow.  Married March 18, 1897 to Miss Alice McDuffy.  One child, Lois Nell.

Dr. Isaac Watson Inlow was born at Manilla, Rush County, Indiana, November 10, 1839.  Studied medicine three years with Dr. J. J. Inlow, of Manilla.  Practiced at Blue Ridge, Shelby County since 1869.  Was married May 4, 1861 to  Miss Mary Callahan, of Rush County, Indiana.  Four children were born, Dr. George I.,  John C.,  Fannie R.  and  Mary M.

James E. Keeling, M.D.  Born October 20, 1865, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from Indiana Medical College 1891.  Practiced at Geneva, Shelby County, from 1891 to 1903.  Practiced at Waldron since 1903.  Married first to Lizzie Benjimen, who died February 9, 1895; then to Mary J. Mitchell on April 29, 1896.  One child by first wife.  Three children by last wife.

George F. Lewis, M.D.  Born April 28, 1860, in Putnam County, Indiana.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College 1898.  Practice in Clay County, Indiana until January 1909, and at Blue Ridge since.  Married June 10, 1883.  Two sons and two daughters.

Elbert Carson Linville, M.D.  Born September 5, 1871, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College of Indianapolis, Indiana 1904.  Practiced in Union Township since 1904.  Married June 23, 1907 to Mrs. Elsie (Young) Rash.

John Lowden, M.D.  Born February 14, 1849, Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated at Eclectic Medical Institute, 1878.  Practiced in Van Buren Township since 1878.  Married October 2, 1879.  Four children.

T. J. McCain, M.D.  Born September 5, 1845, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Medical College of Indiana in 1880.  Practiced at Waldron since.  His last marriage was in November 1905 to Mrs. Belle (Ensminger) Eck.  The doctor has two children living and one dead.

Robert S. McCray, M.D.  Born February 17, 1854, in Hancock County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1883.  Practiced medicine at Morristown since.  Married March 24, 1883, to Miss Nina Hardy.  They have three children.

Oral Holmes McDonald, M.D.  Born January 14, 1880, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College 1904.  Practiced at London, Shelby County, since 1904.  Married December 20, 1906, to Miss Emma May Hasher.  One child.

E. V. Miller, M.D., was born November 30, 1865, in Hancock County, Indiana.  He graduated from the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1896, and from the Medical College of Indiana in 1897.  Has practiced at Fountaintown since 1897.  He married May 2, 1902, to Miss Bertha H. Logean.  Two children living and one dead.

Harry E. Nave, M.D.  Born November 21, 1877, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated at Eclectic Medical College of Indiana, 1905.  Practiced at Arlington, Rush County, eighteen months.  At Fountaintown, Shelby County, since 1906.  Married September 29, 1906 to Miss Maud Shank.  One son.

V. C. Patten, M.D.  Born December 12, 1870, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from Indiana Medical College 1897.  Practiced at Morristown since graduation.  Married January 11, 1905, to Miss Julia A. Gordon.  One child.

David A. Pettigrew, M.D.  Born March 1, 1851, in Decatur County, Indiana.  Graduated from Medical College of Indiana 1881.  Practiced at Flat Rock, Shelby County, since.  Married October 5, 1875 to Miss Tilda Schafer.  They have six children.

Charles H. Perry, M.D.  Born March 10, 1875, at Campbellsville, Kentucky.  Graduated at Hospital College of Medicine at Louisville, Kentucky, 1896.  Practiced at Lewis Creek, Shelby County, Indiana, since 1896.  Married in 1897 to Emma K. White, who died August 13, 1906.  Married June 1, 1908, to Laura M. Trimble.  One child.

William M. Pierson, M.D.  Born in Greenfield, Indiana, August 10, 1850.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College 1874, and the Medical Department of Butler University 1876.  Practiced at Foutaintown until 1903.  Since then, at Morristown.  Married June 6, 1878 to Etoile B. Mutz.  They have three daughter and one son.

Daniel F. Randolph, M.D., was born March 27, 1854, in Owen County, Indiana.  He graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1888.  Practiced at Indianapolis and Newbern, Indiana until 1890.  Practiced at Waldron since 1890.  He was married December 26, 1883 to Miss Alice M. Conover.  One child.

J. H. S. Riley, M.D. Born in Decatur County, Indiana, April 11, 1878.  Graduated at Medical College in 1888.  Practiced at Decatur County from 1904 to 1908.  Practiced at Bengal, Shelby County, since 1908.  

Thomas R. Rubush, M.D.  Born October 2, 1863, at Indianapolis, Indiana.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College September 29, 1879.  Practiced at London, Shelby County, since 1879.  Married September 29, 1880, to Miss Emma Hahn.  Eight children, five living.

William Austin Schooley, M.D.  Born March 9, 1865, in Dearborn County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Ohio Medical College in 1888.  Practiced at Sulphur Hill, Shelby County, Indiana since.  Married June 18, 1890 to Miss Frances True.  Six children.

W. T. Shrout, M.D.  Born May 15, 1845, in Nichols County, Kentucky.  He first graduated from an Eclectic College in Richmond, Virginia, and in 1894 from the Eclectic College of Physicians and Surgeons of Indianapolis.  Practiced in Shelby County since about 1880.  Now, at Waldron.  Married August 22, 1867 to Miss Virginia Neal.  They have five children living and two dead.  One son, a physician.

John W. Snider, M.D.  Born April 26, 1845, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago 1870.  Practiced at Fairland thirty-two years.  Married August 24, 1875 to Miss Mary Laws.  Three children.

Stephen Lewis Strickler, M.D.  Born in Shelby County, Indiana, August 22, 1853.  Attended Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1878 and 1879.  Graduated Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, 1883.  Practiced at Boggstown since 1879.

J. F. Taylor, M.D., was born December 8, 1844, in Jefferson County, Indiana.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, 1878.  Married April 21, 1885 to Miss Hannah V. Henry, who died April 18, 1887.

M. M. Wells, M.D.  Born in Orange County, Indiana, February 25, 1871.  Graduated at Indiana Medical College 1901.  Practiced at Fairland since graduation, excepting eighteen months as intern in hospital.  Married March 2, 1904 to Zella Gordon.  One son, deceased.

Edward Wertz, M.D., was born July 19, 1876, in Shelby County, Indiana.  He graduated from the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1900.  Practiced at Shelbyville, Indiana, a short time and since at Flatrock.  Married July 22, 1897 to Miss Lulu Ford.  Two children.

R. A. Wiltshire, M.D.  Born in Ohio.  Graduated from a Cincinnati College in 1896.  Practiced at Gwynneville since.  Married March 30, 1900 to Miss Alice Buell.  Two children.


PHYSICIANS WHO HAVE PRACTICED MEDICINE IN SHELBY COUNTY,
BUT NOW RESIDE IN OTHER LOCATIONS.


** [continued from above]

Dr. W. C. Furney came to Morristown and began the practice of Medicine about 1891, and remained until 1897.  He then removed from Morristown to Kokomo.

William F. Green, M.D., was born April 6, 1865, in Rush County, Indiana.  Graduated from Louisville Medical College in 1889.  Practiced at Freeport from 1889 to 1892.  At Shelbyville from 1892 to 1903.  Now practicing at Indianapolis.

Dr. E. D. Jewett located at Blue Ridge in 1895, and remained there in the practice for two or three years.

Dr. John Y. Kennedy, Jr., practiced medicine in Shelbyville and in other parts of the county for several years during the nineties.

Samuel A. Kennedy, M.D., was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, August 6, 1832, and was son of John Y. Kennedy.  He graduated from the Ohio Medical College in 1857.  Practiced at Shelbyville, then Marion, and then at Norristown.  He moved from Norristown to Indianapolis, where he now resides, about 1890.  Married February 28, 1855 to Almira Goodrich, who died in 1861.  Married September 1861, to Phoebe J. Goodrich.  He had nine children.

Dr. W. T. Knapp, a graduate of a homeopathic medical college, practiced medicine in Shelbyville for a number of years, and left here about 1895.  He is now located at Vincennes, Indiana.  He was married to Miss Thralls, of this city.

William W. Keeling, M.D., was born October 10, 1830, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1864.  Practiced in Geneva, Shelby County, Indiana from 1865 to 1891, and at Nemaha, Nebraska since 1891.  Married twice, second time to Miss Mary R. Spiers in 1858.  Celebrated golden wedding anniversary at Nemaha, Nebraska last year.  Five children, all living.

Dr. William Loder practiced medicine at Shelbyville for a short time, then at Marietta for a year or two, and then at Lewis Creek for time during the nineties.

J. B. Lytle, M.D., was born May 17, 1835.  Attended Starling Medical College of Columbus, Ohio.  Graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 1870.  Practiced at Flatrock, Shelby County, Indiana from 1865 to 1870.  Then entered drug business in Shelbyville.  Now living in Shelbyville, retired.

Dr. Charles M. Mutz, who was a son of the late Jacob Mutz, of Jackson Township, practiced medicine at Waldron for about two years during the eighties.  He moved from Waldron to St. Louis, Missouri, and from there to Wichita, Kansas, where he now resides.  He was a graduate of a St. Louis college.

Dr. John F. Maddox began the practice of medicine at Fenns, Shelby County, about 1872, and in a short time moved to the Cave, where he practiced until about 1878, when he moved to Shelbyville.  He remained at Shelbyville until 1891, when he removed to Orlando, Florida, where he now resides.  He graduated from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1877. He was married twice; the first time to Miss Coleman, and they had three daughters and one son.

Dr. H. C. Morrow came to Shelbyville for the practice of medicine in 1876, and remained three years.  Married Fannie D. Dixon.  Moved to Texas, where he still resides.  His wife died many years ago.

Samuel P. McCrea, M.D., was born February 2, 1845, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago in 1868.  Was in partnership with  Dr. William F. Green  in the practice of medicine in Shelbyville during 1868 and 1869.  Went in the drug business in Shelbyville in 1870 and continued until 1892.  Now president of Farmers' National Bank.  Married November 21, 1878 to  Miss Phoebe Robinson.  One daughter living and one dead.

Dr. T. J. Norton practiced medicine at Marietta for several years during the nineties.  He moved to Bartholomew County.

Dr. Piatte practiced medicine at Marietta about the time of the war.  Then entered the army as second assistant surgeon.  After the war, settled at Fairland and practiced for several years.  Then went west and is now in Kansas.

Dr. Rufus Roup practiced medicine near the Cave in Shelby County, for several years along about 1870.  He had three daughters and one son.  He now resides in Indianapolis.

Jesse W. Rucker, M.D., was born February 5, 1864, at Greensburg, Indiana.  Graduated from the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio in 1887.  Practiced medicine in Shelbyville from 1887 to 1895.  Moved to Greensburg in 1895 and is now editing a paper there.  Married din 1887 to Stella D. Green.  They have five children.

James W. Shrout, M.D., attended lectures at the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, and later graduated from the Bennett Medical College of Chicago.  He practiced medicine at Blue Ridge and Prescott for about ten years from about 1895 to 1905.  He is now located at Shirley, Indiana.

James F. Scherfee, M.D., located at Fairland in 1898, and continued in the practice of medicine there for about five years.  He is now in California.

Dr. James A. Sims came from the southern part of the state and located at Bengal, where he practiced from 1904 to 1908.  He is now located at Pine Villa, Fountain County, Indiana.

William A. Smith, M.D., was born in Shelby County, Indiana, June 11, 1868.  Graduated from Central College of Physicians and Surgeons of Indianapolis in 1898.  Practiced at Shelbyville a few months, then at Flatrock one and a half years.  Now practicing at St. Louis Crossing, Bartholomew County, Indiana.

Dr. Urbine Stackhouse was a son of a Methodist minister, who at one time had charge of the seminary at Morristown.  While living at Morristown, he graduated in medicine and practiced there for about five years, during the latter part of the eighties.  Then he removed to Randolph County, Indiana.

Irwin W. Treese, M.D., was born January 19, 1851, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Attended Ohio Medical College in 1873 74.  Graduated from Indiana Medical College in 1880.  Located at Smithland in 1874, and continued there until about 1890.  Now resides at Indianapolis.  Married Miss Lena E. Miller in 1875.

F. L. Tilton practiced medicine at Marietta for several years along about 1900.

Harry M. Toner, M.D., was born in Shelby County, Indiana, March 4, 1865.  He attended the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New York, and graduated from a Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1894.  He then located at Shelbyville where he practiced for about ten years, when he retired on account of failing health.  He is now residing in Arizona.  

Edward F. Wells, M.D., was born May 14, 1853, in Miami County, Ohio.  Graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1873.  Practiced medicine in Shelbyville from 1886 to 1890.  Now practicing in Chicago, and lectures in Rush Medical College.

Frank Whetzel, M.D., was born and reared in Morristown.  He received his education in the public schools of that place, and later graduated from a medical college.  He practiced medicine in Morristown for several years, during the latter part of the eighties, and the early part of the nineties, then left Morristown and went to Chicago.

Emma (Coleman) Williams, M.D., was born May 23, 1855, in Shelby County, Indiana.  Graduated from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1884.  Practiced in Shelbyville from 1884 to 1894.  Now retired and living at the Cave.

Besides those who have been mentioned elsewhere in this chapter there are seventy-eight physicians who have been licensed to practice medicine in Shelby County since 1885.  Some of them reside in adjoining counties, some were traveling advertising doctors, and nothing can be learned about many of them.

Chadwick's History of Shelby County, Indiana by Edward H. Chadwick, B.A., assisted by
well known local talent, B.F. Bowen & Co, Pub: Indianapolis, IN, 1909.
Copied by Melinda Moore Weaver

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, March 26, 1889
Page 1
------------------

          There are but sixteen female doctors in Paris, it is said.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Wednesday, September 16, 1885
Page 1   col 3-4
----------
PHYSICIANS
----------
Licensed To Practice in Shelby County
----------
A Long List of the Men Licensed And The Name of the
Colleges Where Those Who Have Diplomas Graduated
----------
          The Democrat gives below a complete list of the physicians licensed up to this date to practice medicine in Shelby county.  These licenses are issued to all persons holding a diploma from some reputable medical college and to those who make affidavit that they have practiced medicine in the State for ten years immediately preceding July 18, 1885, filing with their affidavit the affidavits of two reputable householders or freeholders of said county.  This is called the tne year clause.  The three year clause requires a three year's practice in the State, and an affidavit that the applicant has attended one full course of lectures in some reputable college.  Many physicians, all over the State, who have taken out licenses to practice medicine under the ten years' clause have practiced several times ten years, and have attended several courses of lectures at reputable medical colleges, and are as thoroughly competent as those who hold a diploma, and more so than many who have the "sheepskin."  The following list shows the names of physicians licensed in this county, and the names of the colleges from which they graduated.  Follwing the names of those licensed under the three year clause is the name of the college shere they attended one or more course of lectures:
William T. Knapp
Starling Medical College Columbus, Ohio
Thomas C. Kennedy
Kentucky School of Medicine Louisville, Kentucky
June 26th, 1883
Morris Drake
Ohio Medical College
March lst, 1881
William G. McFadden
Jefferson Medical College Philadelphia, Pa.
March 2nd, 1870
James E. Inlow
License issued under ten years clause
Stephen L. Strickler
Eclectic Medical College
February 6th, 1879
William M. Pierson
Indiana Medical College
February 27, 1874
George W. Fleming
Bellevue Hospital Medical College
March 1st, 1868
Robert R. Washburn
License issued under ten year clause
William W. Keeling
Eclectic Medical Institute Cincinnati, Ohio
February 18th, 1864
William B. Gordon
Ohio Medical College
License issued under three years' clause
William F. Green
Rush Medical College
February 20, 1856
John W. Snyder
Rush Medical College
February 2, 1870
John F. Maddox
Eclectic Medical Institute Cincinnati, Ohio
May 15, 1877
J. R. Jenkins
Miami Medical College
License issued under ten year clause
Frederick Dickmann
License issued under ten year clause
I.H. Drake
Hudson Medical College Cleveland, Ohio
March 2, 1853
Thomas J. McCain
Medical College of Indiana
February 27, 1880
Edward H. Crippen
license issued under ten year clause
Isaac W. Inlow
License issued under ten year clause
James M. Adams
License issued under ten year clause
John Louden
Eclectic Medical Institute Cincinnati, Ohio
January 22, 1878
Samuel Salisbury
license issued under ten year clause
Samuel A. Kennedy, of Shelbyville
Ohio Medical College
March 1, 1857
John Perry
Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery
June, 1859
James A. Comstock
Rush Medical College, of Illinois
January 24, 1886
Hiram Comstock
The Medical College of Ohio
March 3, 1849
Samuel A. Kennedy
Ohio Medical College
license issued under three year clause
W. M. Ford
University of Louisville, Kentucky
March 1, 1877
I. W. Trees
Medical College of Indiana
February 27, 1880
James K. Stewart
Ohio Medical College
1882
John W. Parrish
Eclectic Medical College Cincinnati, Ohio
1858
Hardy Wray
license issued under ten year clause
Hezekiah Smith
license issued under ten year clause
Joseph Bowlby
Ohio Medical College
March 8th, 1883
R. M. Floyd
license issued under ten year clause
Thomas R. Rubush
Medical College of Indiana
February 28th, 1879
Walker K. Baylor
American Medical College, of Cincinnati
May 18th, 1856
J. N. Lucas
Pulte Medical College of Cincinnati
February 13th, 1873
Moses R. Gilmore
The University of Michigan
June 27th, 1860
The Central College of Physicians and Surgeons
of Indianapolis
March 1884
James P. Robins
Ohio Medical College
March 1875
Jacob G. Wolf
Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia
March 7, 18(paper torn)
Gustave G. Winter
License issued under ten year clause
R. D. Raynes
license issued under ten year clause
James W. Green
Rush Medical College
February 20, 1856
John E. McGaughey
Bellevue Hospital Medical College 1873
And Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati 1859
J. M. Larimore
Medical Department of State University of Iowa
February 19, 1869
Henry M. Connelly
Medical College of Indiana
March 1, 1882
N. P. Howard, Sr.
College of Physicians & Surgeons of Indiana
February 22, 1878
And Indiana Medical College
February 28, 1879
Thomas S. Jones
University of Pennsylvania
March 13, 1868
Frank F. Whetzel
Indiana Medical College
J. H. Alexander
Ohio Medical College
N. P. Howard, Jr.
Indiana Medical College
February 28, 1879
Francis M. Howard
Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery
February 14, 1864
J. W. Howard
Medical College of Indiana
License issued under three year clause
Ira C. Fisher
Medical College of Indiana
February 28, 1884
D. J. Ballard
Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery
February 17, 1885
George S. Crawford
Medical College of Indiana
March 1, 1882
James W. Spicer
Cincinnati College of Medicine & Surgery
February 28, 1878
John F. Taylor
Ohio Medical College
February 23, 1879
Samuel Pagin
Bennett Medical College of Chicago
May 26, 1870
-----------
Clause--Have practiced medicine in the State for three/ten years immediately preceding July 18, 1885.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Thursday, April 13, 1882
----------
LOCAL  NEWS
----------
          Dr. Rodden  is in town.
Contributed by D. Darlene Palmer



Atlas of Shelby County, Indiana,  Beers, 1880.

William F. Green           Samuel A. Kennedy
?
W. G. McFadden           George W. Fleming



The  National  Volunteer
SHELBYVILLE, INDIANA
~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~
April 13, 1854
          Carter's Spanish Mixture was advertised to purify the blood.......Also Dr. W.B. Farrell's Arabian Liniment...
Abstracted by Maurice Holmes, in his book Shelbyville, Indiana, Newspaper Excerpts: 1853-1859.  Submitted by Sherry Badgley Ryan, with permission from the author.

The  National  Volunteer
SHELBYVILLE, INDIANA
~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~
February 9, 1854

          Dr. Adams of New York had taken rooms at the Sprague House and could be consulted for all diseases of a chronic and inflammatory nature, including female complaints.....  Also treated were diseases of a private nature such as syphilis and gonorrhea.
Abstracted by Maurice Holmes, in his book Shelbyville, Indiana, Newspaper Excerpts: 1853-1859.  Submitted by Sherry Badgley Ryan, with permission from the author.

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