The  Valparaiso  Vidette - Messenger
November 6, 1939
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 TROUBLE,  TROUBLE,  TROUBLE.
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            Mrs. Harve Arnold  of Fairland, Ind. and a daughter were injured slightly in an automobile accident, Oct. 19.  The next week, her son Troy fell out of a tree and was hurt so badly a leg had to be amputated.  Several days ago, the Arnolds' house burned down.
[This item appeared in newspapers throughout the country.]
Contributed by John Ballard


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday September 17, 1937
Page 1 column 2
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HANNIBAL  ARNOLD  IS  NAMED  ADMINISTRATOR
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          Hannibal Arnold has been appointed administrator of the estate of Cynthia E. Arnold, who died September 10, 1937.  Personal property is valued at $2,000 and real estate at $1,500.
          Heirs include Hannibal Arnold, a son, of R.R.1, Shelbyville, and Mrs. Clara Huffman, a daughter, of 1007 South Twenty-First street, Newcastle, Indiana.  The administrator provided a bond of $4,000 in Shelby Circuit Court today.  A. E. Lisher is the attorney for the administrator.
Contributed by Barb Huff  for Bob McKenzie


The  Valparaiso  Vidette - Messenger
March 15, 1929
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MAN  IS  PUSHED  THROUGH  WINDOW
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          Men usually grin or laugh aloud when rats and mice are mentioned by women.  here is what happened to three Shelbyville, Ind. men -- Stanley Jones,  Fred Sorden  and  Troy Arnold.   The three were standing in front of the Johnson and O'Connor drug store talking.   One of them glanced at the sidewalk and saw a large rat crawling out of a hole.  He jumped and told the others.  All three made a scramble to get away from Mr. Rat.  Arnold was pushed through a large plate-glass window in the store.  He cut his hands slightly.  The rat disappeared.
Contributed by John Ballard


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Tuesday, February 16, 1926
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
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FOR  COUNTY  ASSESSOR.
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          Clarence Arnold, of  Moral township, is a candidate for the nomination of  Assessor for Shelby county, subject to the decision of the democratic voters at the primary election, to be held Tuesday, May 4, 1926.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday March 1, 1923
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SAYS   HIS   WIFE   HAD
ROAMING  DISPOSITION
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(From Tuesday’s Daily)
          Ernest Arnold, of Fairland, charges that his wife,  Mrs. Florence Arnold, possessed a roaming disposition and stayed away from home for two or three months at a time, in a complaint filed in the Shelby circuit court, for a divorce.  Mr. Arnold is a railway conductor and asserts that the last word of his wife was that she was living in El Paso, Texas.  Cheney & Tolen are attorneys for Mr. Arnold.
          The couple was married February 15, 1912, and separated January 8, 1922, the complaint alleges.  Mr. Arnold states that on two or three occasions while he was absent from home, the defendant sold all the household goods and left home.  When she returned she told him it was none of his business where she had been, he states, and informed him she did not care for him and wished he would leave her and never return.  He asserts that she cursed him, said she despised him and frequently kept company with other men.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday April 23, 1914
Page 1 column 4
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SUIT  FOR  DIVORCE
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          Suit for a divorce, custody of children and an allowance of $3 per week for the support of the children was filed in circuit court late this afternoon by  Mrs. Clara M. Arnold  against her husband Charles Arnold, the complaint being prepared by Hord & Adams.  The couple were married October 15, 1902, and the separation took place April 9, 1914.  The children,  Effie Marie,  ten years old, and  Naomi,  four, are now with their mother.  Mrs. Arnold charges her husband with failure to provide, threats to kill her, the habitual use of vile and profane language in addressing her and idleness and indolence.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday July 25, 1906
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WANTS A DIVORCE
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Emma Arnold Charges Her Husband
With Inhuman Treatment
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          Emma Arnold  has applied for a divorce from  Alva Arnold.  They were married November 1, 1903, and lived together until July 23, 1906.  At the time of the marriage, Arnold was a widower with two children.  The last union resulted in one child being born.  The complaint alleges inhuman treatment.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, October 7, 1898
Page 1
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          Mr. Moses Williams, of this city, and  Miss Rosella Arnold, of London, were united in marriage Wednesday night at 8 o'clock at the home of  T. R. Riser, on North Tompkins street, Rev. C. J. Stallard officiating.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
8 October 1891
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          Marriage licenses have been issued to  Edward S. Howard  and  Iona V. Aronold;  Joseph R. Davis and Jessie Story;  William O. Middleton  and  Frances A. Jonas.
Contributed by Susan Kelley


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, March 7, 1890
page 4, column 2
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(Rushville Republican)
          Miss Nellie M. Arnold, formerly of this city, but later of St. Paul, Indiana, was married at Cincinnati, February 25th, to Adam W. Dillon, better known in the theatrical world as Westly Maurella, of the Maurella family of acrobats.  Miss Nellie has now been on the stage nearly five years, achieving quite a success as a soubrette.  They will join the Stevens & Mack Co., at Omaha, Nebraska, in a short time.  Mr. Dillon was in the city Thursday of last week on business.
Contributed by Barb Huff


A  Shelbyville, Indiana,  Newspaper
----------------
Kansas Letter
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Lock Arnold, formerly of Marion,
tells what he has seen in Kansas
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Augusta, Kan, May 31, 1882
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          We have had a very backward spring, too cold for corn to grow.  The wind Seems to blow off a huge snow bank.   At this time there has been a change and we have it warm enough now.  I like the country very well, but will be able to tell better after I have raised a crop.  We have 80 acres in corn and are going over it the third time.  Wheat is good, but there is a small crop sown.
          I have not seen one drop of whisky nor an open saloon since I came to Kansas.   I suppose there is whisky sold in Augusta, but it has to be done on the sly.  There are no open doors to gilded saloons into which to entice boy and young men to drink to destruction.  A prominent business man of Augusta told me that he knew men in this county who before prohibition came into force, spent a large part of their time in loafing around town, and their money for whisky, while their families were at home almost starving.  Now these same men are at home at work taking care of their families.  Tell  Bell Sutton  that he is mistaken about prohibition being a failure.  It fails in this manner:  It puts clothes on the backs of women and children, where rags and tatters were before; it puts food in their mouths and brings happiness to their hearts.
Lock Arnold        

Notes from Bob Gordon:
Bell Sutton is Bellamy Sutton who married Matilda C. Crum on October 19, 1865; Bk 8 p 414
1870 Shelby County census, Brandywine Twp:
          Bell Sutton, 28, born Ohio
          Matilda Sutton, 23, born Indiana
          Elliott Sutton, 3, born Indiana
          Irene Sutton, 10/12, born Indiana
          Adelia McLane, 13, born Iowa
Submitted by Bob Gordon

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