Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Barnard


The  Shelbyville  News
Tuesday, September 22, 1964
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BUSINESS
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          William [Conley] Barnard,  a Shelbyville native, has accepted a position as an attorney with Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical firm.
          Barnard was graduated from Shelbyville High School in 1953.  In 1958 he received a bachelor's degree in politics from Princeton University.  He earned his law degree from the University of Michigan in 1961.
          Before joining Eli Lilly and Company, Barnard was a Deputy Attorney General of Indiana.  He is a member of the American and Indiana State bar associations and Phi Delta Phi professional law fraternity.
          Barnard and his wife, Elizabeth, reside at 301 W. 84th St. in Indianapolis.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Indianapolis  News
Unknown date
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Ringside  in  Hoosierland
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BARNARD  ONCE  BORE
A  BLOODY  NAME
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          Fort Red -- now Barnard -- once witnessed a blood bath.
          That original name for that Putnam County hamlet alluded to a bloody fight that took place there once between northern and southern sympathizers in the Civil War.
          That interesting lore came as a by-product of a search which established conclusively that the change of name of Barnard years ago honored  Calvin C. Barnard, then a leading citizen.
          Letters from several descendants attest that Barnard gave land for the right-of-way and stockyards near there for the railroad provided the company would name the station Barnard.  It did.  He also gave land for the cemetery.
          Mrs. James W. Wright,  R.R.2, Roachdale, a granddaughter of Barnard, sent the story of that bloody fight.  She wrote that the school, built in 1862 by  Mose Carter, was painted red.  She continued:
          "It was known as the little red schoolhouse, having only one room.  During the Civil War a group of men known as 'The Butternuts' was formed in North Salem.  Each wore a butternut on his coat lapel.
          "At the same time a group of men in what is now the Barnard community formed 'The Home Guards.'
          "It was at that same Schoolhouse that these two groups met.  A bitter, bloody fight occurred.  Two men were cut badly with a great loss of blood.  From that encounter the little settlement took on the name of Fort Red."
          She said that in March, 1880, a post office was obtained with  Dr. Henry C. Rogers  as postmaster.  A group of citizens, including Barnard,  Dr. Rogers,  R. J. Hagan  and   J. F. Booker, decided to choose a new name for Fort Red, she added.  Since the railroad station had been named for Barnard they decided on that name for the post office, she said.
GRANDFATHER  RODE  FREE
          Mrs. Wright said the railroad not only named the station for her grandfather but gave him a life-time pass.
          Included in his gift of the land for the cemetery, she continued, was a proviso that the west half be a family plot for the Barnard and Booker families, since Mrs. Barnard's maiden name was Booker.
          "The cemetery has been enlarged but no stone in the west part bears any name other than that of Barnard or Bookers or their descendants," she added.
          She said ground for the church and school was donated by Booker whose grandson now owns and farms the Booker original acreage.
          The story of Barnard's donation of the land was vouched for by a great granddaughter,  Winona Strietelmeier, 5510 N. Delaware, assistant sales manager at the Marott Hotel.
          She was born there and lived there, leaving when she completed the eight elementary years of school.  Her maiden name was  Blaydes.  She added that Barnard and his wife are buried in the Barnard cemetery which is opposite the church and school.
          Mrs. Strietelmeier said she now owns two farms near Barnard.
          Another granddaughter, Mrs. Roy D. Smythe, Roachdale, said the donations of land by Barnard occurred about 1879 or 1880.
          Mrs. John Wilson,  Indianapolis, said that Calvin Barnard was born in Kentucky in 1803.  His father had come from Pennsylvania.  Calvin Barnard was the great, great-grandfather of her husband, she added.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, April 3, 1942
Page 1
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18  CANDIDATES  FILE
NAMES  AS  DEADLINE  NEARS
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10 Dem., 8 G.O.P. Aspirants for
County Offices and Organization Posts
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           J. P. Barnard, local attorney, last night declared his intention of seeking the Republican nomination for prosecuting attorney, and  George W. Crafton announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for city councilman form the Fifth ward.
          In the meantime twelve vacancies remained on the Republican ticket -- county clerk, county auditor, county treasurer, county surveyor, county assessor and seven places on the county council.  In the event no candidates for the offices today or tomorrow, they will be filled by the county committee.
Practiced  Seven  Years
          A practicing attorney for the past seven years, Barnard was graduated from Indiana university with the degree of LLB in 1935.  Prior to that he had studied at DePauw university, receiving his pre-law training there.  During his high school days here, Barnard was a member of the basketball team and won membership in the National Honor Society with a high scholastic average.  He placed third in the state debate contest during his career in the local school.
          He was born in Manilla on March 20, 1912, his father, Dr. R. F. Barnard then being a dentiest in Morristown.  His wife is the former  Betty White, daughter of  Dr. J. A. White  and  Margaret Smith White.  Mr. and Mrs. Barnard have two children.
Served  As  Secretary
   
       The Republican candidate served as secretary of the Republican county committee in 1936-38 and was election commissioner in 1936.  He served as deputy prosecutor under Judge Harold G. Barger, then prosecuting attorney.  He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and also holds membership in the Phi Delta Phi, professional fraternity; Alpha Tau Omega, social fraternity, the Elks club and of the Shelby county and Indiana State Bar Association.  He has been admitted to practice before the Indiana supreme court and has been admitted to the bar of the federal district court at Indianapolis.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming  for Karin Shultz


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, September 3, 1936
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MORRISTOWN  CHOIR
TO  GIVE  CONCERT
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Mrs. Helen Barnard Lougher, of
Greenfield, to Be Visiting Artist
at Program, Sunday, Sept. 13.
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          Mrs. Helen Barnard Lougher,  of Greenfield, will be one of the visiting artists at the third annual musical concert given by the choir of the Morristown M.E. church on the evening of Sunday, Sept. 13.  Mrs. Lougher was a member of the Barnard family orchestra, which, a few years ago, won wide recognition throughout central Indiana.  She is considered one of the finest trumpet soloists in the state.
          Others from out of Morristown who will participate in the program include the  Chafee  of Shelbyville and  Mrs. Eva Nave Gordon  and  Mrs. Helen Snider Martin,  both of the Fountaintown M.E. church.  Singers from the Christian and Methodist Protestant churches of Morristown are co-operating.  The program is in charge of  J. A. Zike,  director of the chori, and  Mrs. John Harper  is the accompanist.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A Franklin, Indiana Newspaper
Circa 1940
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KIWANIS  OFFICIAL  VISITS
RELATIVES  HERE
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          Joe Garrett  of Sheridan, Mont., is in Franklin for a short visit with his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Barnard.  Mr. Garrett, who is a lieutenant governor for the state of Montana if Kiwanis International, has been attending the Kiwanis convention in Chicago, and while there met his wife's uncle for the first time.
        Mrs. Garrett  was the former  Marion Hester, who attended Franklin high school while living at the home of  Mr. and Mrs. Barnard.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A Franklin, Indiana Newspaper
Wednesday, January 3, 1940
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Club  Leader



Kiwanis Installs 1940 President
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Marshall Barnard Succeeds LaGrange
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          Marshall Barnard  was installed Tuesday as president for 1940 of the Franklin Kiwanis club, succeeding  Richard L. LaGrange .
          Mr. Barnard was inducted into office in a ceremony conducted by  Myron McCurry,  past district governor and former president of the local club.  Mr. McCurry presented the president's pin to the new club leader and also pinned the past president's pin upon Mr. LaGrange.
          In responsive talks, Mr. Barnard pledged a full measure of service to his new responsibilities and asked for continued co-operation of the club during the new year, while Mr. LaGrange offered his thanks to the club for its helpfulness in making 1939 a good year for Kiwanis and expressed his appreciation for having been given the experience of the club's leadership.
          Other officers included in the induction ceremony were Field Dailey, vice-president;  L. Vern Tapp, secretary, and  Mark Handley, treasurer.
          New directors held a brief business meeting at the close of the luncheon session.  They are  William C. Baise,  Reid Dugger,  Ira Haymaker, Jr.,  Richard Suckow,  Fred Tulley,  Dr. J. C. VanAntwerp  and  Lindley Winslow.
          The meeting was in charge of the Education committee which is headed py[sic]  Elba Branigin, Sr.
          A favorable attendance was noted as the new year's first meeting was held.  Fred Tulley, Jr., was the only guest.
          Dick Suckow, who has been ill for several weeks, has now fully recovered and was back in the club line-up again.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A  Shelbyville,  Indiana  Newspaper
December, 1938
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Miss Elizabeth Barnard Becomes Bride
of John Wesley Fleming.
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          Two of the city's most widely known young people were united in marriage Saturday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, when  Miss Elizabeth Barnard, daughter of  Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Barnard,  became the bride of  John Wesley Fleming,  son of  Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Fleming,  of 334 west Mechanic street.  The ceremony took place at the home of the bride's parents, 37 west Mechanic street.
          The single ring service was read by Dr. J. W. McFall, pastor of the First M. E. church, before the fireplace, which was banked with ferns and palms.  The mantle was decorated with pompom chrysanthemums, snapdragons and carnations, all in white.   Two seven-branch candelabras, each decorated at the front with a bonquet of white flowers and ferns, were also used in the decorations.
          As the bridal procession came down the stairs, Miss Ellen Stewart, pianist, played Lohengrin's wedding march.  Preceding the ceremony she played "Oh, Promise Me,"  "My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice"  and  "Liebestraum."  During the service she played "I Love You Truly" and following the wedding she played Mendelssohn's wedding march.
          The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a floor-length dress of pale blue velvet with long sleeves shirred at the cuffs.  Shirring at the front of the waist was held by bands of velvet.  She wore matching satin sandals.  At the neck of the dress she wore a pair of rhinestone clips.  Her bouquet was of white snapdragons, gardenias and pompom chrysanthemums.  She carried a white lace handkerchief that was carried by  Mrs. Louis Spolyar,  of Indianapolis, at her wedding.
          Mrs. J. Paul Barnard, of this city, was matron of honor and wore a floor-length princess style gown of cyclamen faille, with a bolero jacket.  A row of velvet-covered buttons, a darker shade than the gown, extended the full length of the dress, and buttons also trimmed the sleeves of the jacket.  Her satin slippers matched the dress.  She wore a single string of pearls and carried a bouquet of cyclamen pompom chrysanthemums.  Both the bride and her attendant wore matching flowers in their hair.
          J. Paul Barnard, brother of the bride, was the best man.
          Mrs. Barnard,  mother of the bride, wore a black velvet gown trimmed at the neck with white lace, and  Mrs. Fleming,  mother of the bridegroom, wore a part wine crepe skirt with shirred turquoise blouse.
          Approximately fifty guests attended the wedding.  Following the ceremony a reception was held.
          After the reception Mr. and Mrs. Fleming left for a two weeks trip to Miami, Fla.  Mrs. Fleming's traveling outfit was a gold wool ensemble with black accessories.  When they return they will be at home at 215 west Franklin street.
          Mrs. Fleming was graduated from Shelbyville high school and attended DePauw university, where she was a member of the local chapter of Tri Kappa sorority, and is employed as secretary at the Inlow Clinic here.
          Mr. Fleming was graduated from Arsenal Technical high school, Indianapolis, and attended Purdue university.  He is a member of Phi Epsilon fraternity and is employed at Sandman Bros, in this city.
          Out-of-town guests at the wedding were  Dr. and Mrs. Louis W. Spolyar,  Mrs. and Mrs. Otto Cross  and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Sneden,  all of Indianapolis.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


An  Indianapolis  Newspaper
December, 1938
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On Honeymoon
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          SHELBYVILLE, Ind.,  December 13 (Spl.) -- Before her marriage here Saturday, Mrs. John W. Fleming  was  Miss Elizabeth Barnard,  daughter of  Dr. and Mrs. R. F. [Roy French] Barnard.  Mr. Fleming is the son of  Mr. and Mrs. G. R. [Garnett Rothrock] Fleming.  The ceremony took place at the home of the bride's parents with  Dr. J. W. McFall, pastor of the first Methodist Episcopal church, officiating.
          Mr. and Mrs. Fleming are on a two-week trip to Miami, Fla., and will live here after their return.
          Mrs. Fleming was graduated the Shelbyville High School and attended DePauw University.  She is a member of Delta Delta Delta and Tri Kappa sororities.  Mr. Fleming was graduated from Arsenal Techical High School at Indianapolis and attended Purdue University.  He is a member of Phi Epsilon Fraternity.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


Unknown central Indiana newspaper
circa November, 1932
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D. E.  BARNARD  HAS
92ND  ANNIVERSARY
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          David Elmore Barnard,  oldest resident of Walker township, Rush county, celebrated the 92nd anniversary of his birth yesterday with a dinner at his home in Manilla.  Despite his advanced age, Mr. Barnard enjoys fairly good health and is keenly interested in public affairs.
          His health has been somewhat impaired since he was struck by an automobile in Manilla about a year ago.
          Mr. Barnard is a Civil war veteran having served for three years with the Union soldiers.  He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and is looking forward to the national election next Tuesday.  When asked if he was going to case his vote for the reelection of President Hoover, Mr. Barnard replied:  "If I have to crawl to the polls to do it."
Held in High Esteem
          The aged man has lived in Manilla for the past ten years and previously resided north of that town.  He is a member of the Blue River Friends church.  Mr. Barnard is widely known in Shelby and Rush counties where he is held in high esteem.
          Twenty-three guests attended the birthday dinner served at noon yesterday and a number of relatives and friends called during the afternoon to extend congratulations.  Among those present for the dinner were his two sons, Marshall, of Franklin, and  Dr. R.[oy] F.[rench] Barnard, of this city, their wives, a granddaughter, Elizabeth Barnard, of this city;  Curtis Weisman  of Franklin;  Rev. and Mrs. Oscar Jean  and son,  Thomas, of Manilla;  Mrs. Milton Pitts,  Mrs. E. E. Lowe,  Mrs. Mae Lowe  and  Mrs. Orrill Badger, of Manilla; and several nurses and attendants at the local hospital, where Mr. Barnard was confined following his accident a year ago.  The hospital staff members present were  Misses Noailes Hayes, superintendent,  Misses Lillian Wood,  Mary Thomas,  Evelyn Acre,  Helen Ross,  Bertha Truex  and Esther Thompson, nurses, and  Mrs. Viola Hopkins  and Dola Goodwin, attendants.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


Unknown central Indiana newspaper
circa November, 1932
* * * *
Birthday  Dinner
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          Honoring the ninety-second birthday of  David Elmore Barnard  a birthday party was given at his home in Manilla, Wednesday.  At twelve o'clock a high noon dinner was served after which a social time was enjoyed.
          Guests included:  Misses Viola Hopkins,  Ellen Ross,  Esther Compton,  Bertha Trues,  Lillian Woods,  Mary Thompson,  Evelyn Acree  and  Noailes Hayes  and  Mrs. Dolan Goodwin, all nurses of a Shelbyville hospital where Mr. Barnard was a patient for some time;  Dr. and  Mrs. R. F. Barnard  and daughter, Elizabeth, of Shelbyville;  Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Barnard  and  Curtis Weisman  of Franklin;  Mrs. Milton Pitts,  Rev. and Mrs. Oscar Jean  and son,  Mrs. E. E. Lowe,  Mrs. Orril Badger  and  Mrs. Mae Lowe  of Manilla.
          Dr. Barnard and Marshall Barnard are sons of the honored guest.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Daily  Democrat
Monday, November 20, 1916
Page 4,  Column 2
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WILL  MOVE  TOMORROW
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           Dr. R. F. Barnard, who has been practicing dentistry in this city for the past four years in partnership with  Dr. W. E. Blackburn, has purchased the office of  Dr. L. B. Schrader,  located above the  Major & Sheldon  jewelry store, and will continue the practice of his profession in that location.  Dr. Barnard will move into his new office tomorrow and will be ready for business Wednesday.  The room was formerly occupied by the late  Dr. H. C. Goodrich.
          [There is an article in  The Shelby Democrat,  Thursday, November 23, 1916, regarding a promotion Dr. Schrader received, requiring his relocation.]
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday, July 27, 1916
Twenty-Ninth Year  No. 70
Page 1
==============
STATE  CHEMIST  COMING
HERE  WITHIN  TEN  DAYS
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According to Announcement
Made Today By Food and
Drug Commission.
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          The Democrat  received a message this afternoon thru the United Press news service, stating that the state food and drug commissioner,  H. E. Barnard,  had announced that State Chemist  John C. Diggs  would be sent to Shelbyville within the next ten days to make a complete investigation of the water system of the city.  Mr. Diggs is at present busy in northern Indiana, or doubtless he would be be sent at once.  Mr. Diggs will be instructed to report his findings to Mr. Barnard and these will in turn be sent back to Shelbyville officials.  [Article continues.]
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday, March 6, 1911
Page 1
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WILL  RESUME  LAW  PRACTICE
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Former Representative Barnard
Arrives Home From Washington.
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         Newcastle, Ind., March 5. -- William O. Barnard, whose term expired Saturday at noon as Representative in Congress from the Sixth district, accompanied by Mrs. Barnard, arrived this afternoon from Washington, a delegation of friends being at the station to meet him.  Mr. Barnard will resume the practice of law with  William E. Jeffrey  as associate.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, September 18, 1908
Page 1
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ANOTHER  BIG  CROWD
FOR  JUDGE  BARNARD
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Large Number Attended Republican Meeting
in Geneva Last Night to Hear Congressional Candidate
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          A large crowd attended the Republican meeting at Geneva last night to hear Judge Barnard.
         
Judge Barnard [copy too light].
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The Hancock Democrat
Thursday Morning, February 13, 1908
Page 1
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The Barnards.
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          The Barnard family of musicians, known to Lyceum people as The Barnards, arrived in Spiceland, Tuesday, from Columbus Ohio.  They have a lay-off of a week and a half before going to their work in Kentucky, and will spend this time visiting the Gordons.  The Barnards have a two-year contract with the American Lyceum Union, of Rochester, N. Y., for lecture course and Chautauqua work.  Arrangements have been made by Spiceland people for them to give a concert while here.  The entertainment will be given in the Friends' church Thursday evening, Feb. 13, beginning at 7:30 o'clock.
          The Barnards are in the employ of the largest lyceum bureau in the United States, which is a sufficient guarantee of their work.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Tuesday, September 17, 1907
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DAIRYMEN  SELLING
GOOD  GRADE  OF  MILK
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Samples Sent to Dr. Barnard,
State Chemist, This Week
And He Complimented The
Local Dairymen.
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(From Friday's Daily.)
          "Dairymen of Shelbyville are all selling a fine grade of milk," was the information  Dr. H. G. Keeney,  secretary of the city board of health, received over the telephone this afternoon from  Dr. Barnard,  of Indianapolis, state chemist.
          Wednesday of this week  Alfred W. Bruner,  state food and drug inspector, called on our dairymen and other dealers in this city and collected samples of their goods.  They were sent to Indianapolis where they were analyzed by Dr. Barnard.  He highly complimented the local dairymen this afternoon in the kind of milk they were delivering to their patrons in this city.  Dr. Barnard also stated to Dr. Keeney that the samples of vinegar which were taken up at several of the grocery stores were below par.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Shelbyville, Ind., February 23, 1897
==================================
          Cullen, Martin & Megee will make a motion for a new trial for  Theodore Skotski, sentenced for two years at New Castle for aiding Reinheimer to escape.  They will base their motion on exceptions to Judge Barnard's rulings and instructions to the jury.  They are confident of a new trial.  If they fail to get one the case will be appealed to the Supreme court, where, they are confident, Judge Barnard's ruling will not be sustained. -- Rushville Jacksonian.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming

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