Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Fleming


The  Indianapolis  Star
June 27, 1981
Page 10   column 1
----------
Contact the Indiana State Library for a full copy.
Clocks / Old clock that once stood atop Fleming Building in Shelbyville rescued, to be started at Weber Clock Shop, Broad Ripple, 100 years after it first started ticking.


The  Kokomo  Tribune
May 15, 1930
Page 2
----------
Convicted in Federal Court
----------
Indianapolis, May 15---
          George E. Fleming,  attorney of Shelbyville, Ind. and New York, was convicted in federal court today of having used the mails to defraud persons by leading them to believe that as heirs of  Robert Edwards  they have a valid claim to valuable New York property.  Fleming will be sentenced May 24.  He said an appeal would be filed.  The maximum penalty is a sentence of five years imprisonment and a fine of $1,000.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


An  Unidentified  Shelbyville  Newspaper
February, 1925
----------
Fleming Estate Is Valued at $80,000
----------
          The Security Trust & Savings Co. of this city, has been appointed administrator of the estate of the late  Thomas W. Fleming, who died at his home here this week.  Appointment was made today in the Shelby circuit court on the petition of  Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moffett  and  George E. Fleming,  daughter and son of Mr. Fleming, who surrender their privilege of serving the administration of the estate.
          Mr. Fleming left an estate valued at approximately $80,000, the records show.  This consists of personal property worth $65,000 and real estate valued at $15,000.  The daughter and son are the only heirs, there being no will providing for a distribution of the estate.  The trust company will serve as administrator of the estate without bond, as provided under the Indiana law.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming



Garnet R. Fleming
   
The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, August 29, 1924
Page 1   Column 2
----------
NAMED  TO  LEAD  "BILLS"
OF  STATE  FOR  ONE  YEAR
----------
          Garnet R. Fleming, of this city, elected president of the Indiana Elks' Association at the annual convention of the state organization this week in Terre Haute, has been associated with the activities of the higher circles of the lodge for several years.  Mr. Fleming returned to his home Thursday after attending the state convention where he was elecated to the highest office of the "Bills" in the state.
          After serving thru all the chairs of Lodge No. 457, here, including the station of exalted ruler, Mr. Fleming was appointed a district deput of the lodge and in that capacity traveled thruout the central part of the state, visiting lodges and assisting in the work that was carried on.  His good judgment and business ability were paramount factors in the reorganization of several of the charters in the district.  Mr. Fleming is the vice president of the D. L. Conrey Furniture Co. here.
          Following his arrival home from the state meeting, Mr. Fleming announced the appointment of  William Groebl,  of this city, as secretary to the president of the state association.  Mr. Groebl is past exalted ruler of the Shelbyville lodge and at present occupies the office of local secretary.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming



The  Shelby  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind.
Tuesday, September 20, 1921
----------
          Frank Fleming left for Indianapolis Monday, where he went to the St. Vincent Hospital for the removal of his tonsils.
[same paper, same date, same page, two entries below the above entry!]
          Frank Fleming, who underwent an operation at the St. Vincent hospital Monday for the removal of his tonsils is rapidly recovering and will return home Wednesday.
Submitted by Maureen Sheehan.
Ibid.
WE  HAVE  THE  BEST
          It's a temptation just to visit our store. The choicest vegetables and fruits, and the best grade staple goods are found here.
          Don't worry about plannng a menu --- just come over and shop.  We guarantee you will find food to tempt the most jaded appetite.
          If you are not trading with us, give us an opportunity to show how we serve our customers.
FLEMING  BROS.
19 NORTH HARRISON ST.
Phones 307 & 1107
Submitted by Maureen Sheehan.


The  Shelby  Democrat
Shelbyville, Indiana
Monday, September 19, 1921
----------
          Thomas Fleming, who has been spending the past few weeks at a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Mich., returned to his home in this city Sunday.
Submitted by Maureen Sheehan.


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, April 3, 1913.
Page 4   Column 4
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          Garnet Fleming,  who underwent such a terrible ordeal in the flood at Dayton, was so much better this morning that he was able to take an automobile ride.  For a time Sunday night and Monday his condition was a source of alarm to his relatives and he was not allowed to receive visitors or talk of his trying experience.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, April 3, 1913.
Page 4   Column 5-6
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GARNET  FLEMING  BACK
FROM  JAWS  OF  DEATH
----------
Shelbyville Boy Had Nar- row Escape in the Flood
At Dayton, Ohio.
----------
COLLAPSED  ON  REACHING  HOME
----------
Now Under Care of Physician and No One Allowed in His Room --- Willis
Wolfe, Brother of Frank Wolfe, Had Trying Experience.
----------
(From Monday's Daily)
          Escaping from the very jaws of death, which opened wide for him and many others at Dayton, Ohio, last week,  Garnet Fleming  of 309 south West street, is now at the home of his father,  Caughey S. Fleming,  31 east Mechanic street, suffering the tortures of those who collapse after fierce mental and physical strain.  His condition is very serious, but his relatives and the attending physician,  Dr. W. C. McFadden,  say he will recover.  However, no one is admitted to his room and reltaives informed a representative of the Democrat that his wife had suffered such a shock when she saw his condition and heard the story of his experience that even she could not be interviewed, as she had suffered a nervous collapse.  This situation gave rise to rumors that Mr. Fleming's mind had been unbalanced and that he was a physical and mental wreck, but his relatives deny that the situation is serious, and they insist he will be out in a very short time if he is allowed to take a bery much needed rest.
          Mr. Fleming was a prisoner in the Beckel House at Dayton from Monday night until Friday afternoon along with scores of other men and a number of women.  He had reached Dayton by rail late Monday evening and after starting to the hotel was forced to run to escape the swift currents that came rushing thru the streets as the flood broke.  The water became fifteen feet deep about the hotel and the crowd in the Beckel House as well as in many other place[s] of refuge in the stricken city lived in terror every moment.  Adding to the terror of the water the building caught on fire and it looked for a time that it must be a choice of death in the flames or in the raging waters.  Finally a part of the building collapsed, but Mr. Fleming was among the number saved.  During the time the crowd was imprisoned in the house they had nothing to eat except a few oranges and other bits of food they could fish from the waters thru the windows of the supper stories.  The only drinking water they had was what could be caught from the eaves of the building and many of them were weakened from want of food and water by the time they could be taken from the building on Friday.
          As soon as Mr. Fleming was able to leave the building he made his way out of the city on a freight train and went to Columbus, Ohio.  His experience in reaching Indianapolis and this city added to his exhaustion, and when he was let out of an auto in this city at five o'clock Sunday evening he was so weak he could scarcely walk.  He made his way to the home of his father on east Mechanic street and as he was addressed at the gate by a samll boy who knew him, broke into tears and collapsed utterly.  Since then he has been under the care of the physician and has not been allowed to talk at any length regarding the terrible experience.
          Little less sensational than the story of Mr. Fleming is that told by  Willis R. Wolfe,  of Newpoint, Ind., who is here visiting his brother,  Frank H. Wolfe,  the well-known attorney and operator for the Western Union Telegraph Company.  Mr. Wolfe seems to have gone thru an experience almost as trying as that of Mr. Fleming, but so far his iron nerve has kept him from any apparent suffering.  Mr. Wolfe was on his was to Pittsburgh on business and reached Dayton Monday night.  There was a downpour of rain, but he went to bed not thinking of any serious consequences.  He had chosen the Giddy hotel as his stopping place,  It proved his salvation, as well as that ofnearly fifty other people, many of them women.  When he arose at eight o'clock Tuesday morning the rain was still coming in torrents, but the flood had not then reached that section of the city.  However, by the time he had made his toilet people were running for the hotel to escape the flood and by the time some of them reached it they were splaching thru water knee deep.  In a short time the water reached a height of sixteen feet and the refugees were forced to the second and third stori[e]s of the hotel, the men for the most part occupying the third story and the women the second.
          Mr. Wolfe stated that he and the men in the third story lived all the time they were there, or until Friday afternoon, on some heads of cabbage they were able to fish from the water by risking their lives on the fire escapes.  Once they thought they had found a can of jelly, but then opened it seemed to addinsult to injury by proving to be chili sauce.  Mr. Wolfe was will ing to admit, however, that even cabbage and chili sauce were better than nothing as it kept them at least from feeling they were starving to death.  He said it might have been better had it not become saturated to some extent from the oil that was floating at all times on the water.  The only water they had to drink was what they could catch in cups as it dripped from the eaves of the building.
          Tuesday afternoon Mr. Wolfe and some of the men managed to throw a rope from the Giddy house to the Wolfe hotel and by this means rescued three young men who had been clinging to a raft they had made from a bedstead and some other furniture.  During the time they were held in the building Mr. Wolfe said he could sit in the window and see five other buildings burning near them.  These sights added to the terror and many of the women fainted and some of them collapsed and remained in critical condition even after they were rescued.  He said that it was a common sight to see horses, dogs, cats and other animals go to their death.
          Mr. Wolfe also described many of the scenes of horror following the flood as he did not leave the city till Friday night.  He told of one incident in which a negro, suspected of looting, was caught by the soldiers.  When the brute was searched three fingers bearing diamond rings and an ear bearing a diamond ear-ring were found in his pockets.  He had cut them from corpses.  The soldiers gave him the frewsome evidence of his guilt and told him to run as fast as he could as they never wanted to see him again.  He had taken only a few steps when he fell dead from a half dozen bullets that had pierced his fiendish body.  Mr. Wolfe related another indicent in which a soldier was found turning over a body he had found in the street.  He was arrested by his comrades on the suspicion that he had intended to rob the body and is said to have been executed at sunrise Saturday morning.
          Just as Mr. Wolfe and some of the men were leaving the hotel one of the men saw what he thought was a shoe in the street.  One of the men kicked the shoe and found that it was on the foot of a man buried in the mud and debris in the street.  Mr. Wolfe said he had a difficult time in getting out of the city and that he was not allowed to leave until he had proved to the satisfaction of the authorities that he was an attorney of this city and had pressing interests at home.  He was able to accomplish this thru the fact that he had some letter-heads and envelopes bearing the name of his brother, the attorney.
          Mr. Wolfe came to Indianapolis after leaving Dayton and then to Fairland over the Big Four this morning.  From Fairland he came to this city on an electric speeder over the traction line, reaching here at nine-twenty o'clock this morning.
          Louis Root  and  Bert Schaffer  came home this morning from their trip to Dayton.  They left the latter part of last week to locate Mr. Root's grandfather,  C. J. Root,  and daughter,  Miss Clara,  when relatives here were unable to get any word from them by telegraph or telephone.  They found they had not suffered greatly by the flood.  Messrs. Root and Schaffer were loud in their praise of the manner in which the National cash register people were aiding in the work of caring for the sufferers.  When the flood broke, the plant, they say, turned all its energy to building and manning boats for the rescue work.  Boats were turned out at the rate of one every ten minutes and many Dayton people today owe their lives to this heroic crew of inland mariners.  As soon as the flood had subsided the plant turned its energy to making caskets and the coffins were given without charge to those having need to bury a relative or friend.  All of the resources of the mammoth plant were being turned to the work of caring for the homeless at the time Messrs. Root and Schaffer were in the city.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind., Friday, February 14, 1913.
OTHER  PARTIES.
------------
          Miss Fern Fleming  entertained eight couples of her friends last evening at the home of her parents,  Mr. and Mrs. William Fleming,  203 west Mechanic street, at a pretty valentine party.  The evening was spent at games, music and contests, after which refreshments were served.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday Afternoon, February 13, 1913
Page 1, Column 2
----------
          Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fleming  were passengers to Indianapolis today.
Contributed by Melinda Moore Weaver


The  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, August 24, 1911
Page 4   column 4
----------
IN  BUSINESS  AGAIN.
----------
          I desire to call the attention of all my friends and former patrons to the fact that I am in business again, having opened a saloon in my new building at Harrison and Jackson streets.  I am able to supply your wants with a choice line of liquors and cigars and cordailly invite your patronage.  Courteous treatment will be accorded to all.  Give me a call.  William Fleming.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Friday, June 18, 1909
Page 1
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SHELBYVILLE  BOY  WINS  PREFERMENT
----------
New  York  Judge  Classes  George  Elliott  Fleming,
Formerly  of  this  City,  As  Among  the
"Best  Lawyers"  of  the  Metropolis.
----------
          Shelby county is proud of her sons and daughters, whether they win success and honor within her own confines or go into strange parts and bring glory to her name by wresting from strangers a goodly place in the niches of life.  It is with pleasure, therefore, that the Democrat chronicles the success of a Shelbyville boy in New York, where the struggle for preferment is the most hotly contested.
          In the New York Evening Journal of June 16 appears, under "scare" headlines, an article telling of an innovation in the manner "of selecting attorneys to represent the poor in litigation.  The story says:
        "Reputable lawyers are ready today to be assigned to represent prisoners who are too poor to employ counsel in the court of general sessions.  This is the result of an effort on the part of the judges to crush out the 'shyster' lawyers, who misrepresent the bar."
          Then follows the list of gentlemen who have been selected, among which list is the name of  George Elliott Fleming,  son of  Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Fleming, of this city.
          George Fleming has a host of friends in this city who are glad to hear of his success in his chosen profession, and wish him still greater honors.  He was born and reared in this city, and is a graduate of the Haverford Preparatory School, Harvard College, and the law department of Harvard College.  Mr. Fleming possesses a plentitude of grains, is of pleasing address, and his friends expect great things of hem before he reaches the meridian of life.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday, March 18, 1909
Page 1   column 3
----------
BROTHERS  AMBUSHED
                AND  SHOT  BY  ENEMIES
----------
West Virginia Feud Renewed and
John Fleming is Killed
----------
          Huntington, W. Va., March 18. --- John and  Frank Fleming,  two alleged members of a feud gang that has terrorized Harts Creek, in Lincoln county, forty miles north of this city, were shot from ambush last evening and as a result a renewal of feud activities is now anticipated.  Frank Fleming was killed and his brother John seriously wounded.
          The latter was released from the penitentiary last Saturday, where he served a term of two years for conspiracy to defraud the government.  When he reached home Monday he learned that his young wife, after securing a divorce from him, had married  John McCoy,  a bitter enemy of his.
          The two Flemings last evening started for McCoy's home near Allenville.  While on the way they were ambushed.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
August 13, 1908
----------
          Misses Mary  and  Fannybel Fleming  are in London this afternoon, where they will visit for several days.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Monday, September 2, 1907
---------------
NEWS  NOTES.
----------
          Harry Fleming, who has been driving the delivery wagon for the  Rapp  grocery for several years, has taken a position at the  Morrison & DePrez  drug store.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Friday, February 2, 1906
-----O-----
PERSONAL  AND  SOCIAL
----------
(From Thursday's Daily.)
          Thomas Fleming  is grandfather the second time.  A 7 pound baby boy was born yesterday in the home of his daughter, Elizabeth Moffett, in Glassboro, N. J.  It has been named  Thomas Fleming Moffitt.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
June 15, 1904
Page 3   column 2
----------
LOCAL  NEWS
----------
          T. W. Fleming  and wife will go to Glassboro, N. J., to-morrow to visit their daughter for two weeks.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
May 9, 1899
----------
          Thomas W. Fleming  remembers very well the fact that it rained hard all day twenty-sixty ears ago.  On that evening he was married, an incident he will not for get [sic] or ever regret for marriage with him has been a perpetual pleasure.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
May 31, 1894
Page 3   column 3
----------
          Mrs. Jane Fleming  has been declared a person of unsound mind, by the court, and  Henry Doble  appointed her guardian.  Bond, $1,500.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Saturday  Review
[Decatur County, Indiana]
June 15, 1892
Page 4
----------
TARKEO
----------
          Ira Roberts  was riding a mare belonging to  Dr. J. J. Flemming's down the road, accidently[sic] broke it's leg.
Contributed by Bob Parkison


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, December 7, 1886
Page 1
------------
WILLIAM  FLEMING
----------
SHOT  LAST  NIGHT  BY  WILL  DENNY
----------
The Shooting Occurs about
Ten O'clock at McLaughlin
and Fleming's Saloon.
----------
Fleming Becomes Offended at a Re-
mark He Alleges Denny made
About His, Fleming's Family.
----------
They Have Hot Words About the Mat-
ter and Fleming, Denny says,
Threatens His Life.
----------
Denny the Draws His Revolver and
Fires, Shooting Fleming in the Left
Shoulder.  The Ball is Deflected
Downwards by Striking The
Shoulder-blade and Pene-
trates the Lungs
----------
Denny Goes to Jail and Gives Himself up
To Sheriff Moer -- Fleming's Condi-
tion at Noon To-day Hopeful,
and the Indications Point
To His Recovery.

----------
          William Fleming,  of the firm of  McLaughlin & Fleming,  saloon keepers, on East Washington street, was shot and dangerously wounded at twenty minutes before ten o'clock last night, by  Will Denny,  bartender for  Joe Nolan.  There were present in the saloon at the time of the shooting,  Tom McCue,  James Whitcomb,  Will Moore,  Ony Kiloran,  John Burk,  and a man named  Woodard.  A few minutes after the shooting occurred, Denny was lodged in jail, having voluntarily accompanied John Burck there and gave himself up, [a few words missing]  Democrat reporter there this morning.

DENNY'S  STORY.

          I had been playing poker in the early part of the evening, and went broke, and I went around to Billy Fleming's and asked him to loan me two or three dollars.  He said 'all right; you can have anything you want,' and gave me $3.  I went back and blowed that in, and then went back to Fleming's and sat down in there and commenced to talk to Billy.  He got mad at something that I should have said about his family, and commenced to abuse me.  I didn't say much, only I told him that he was wrong about it.  He kept on abusing me and told me he had a notion to kill me, and said that if I ever repeated the remark he claims I made, that offended him, he would bow my brains out.  I got up and went out then, going back to where I had been playing, and meeting  Ben Laws  I asked him for his revolver.  He let me have it and I asked  John Burk  to come and take a walk with me.  He came along and we went back to McLaughlin & Fleming's.  I called for a beer and Burk took a cigar.  I invited Fleming to drink with me, and he refused to do it, and told me that he didn't want to drink with me or have any thing to do with me, and wanted me to get out of the house, saying that he had a notion to kill me.  I thought he meant what he said, and as he turned partly around I reached over the bar and shot him."

JOHN  BURK.

          I never knew Denny had a gun when he asked me to go with him, or I would have taken it away from him.  He was about half drunk and told me that he had had trouble and wanted me to go in McLaughlin & Fleming's and get a drink with him.  I told him I didn't want a drink, and told him if he had had trouble he oughtn't to drink another drop.  I went in with him though, and he called for a beer and I took a cigar.  I stepped on down to the end of the counter to light my cigar, and heard some words pass between Denny and Fleming, Denny asking him to drink with him, and he refused.  Something was said about something Denny should have said about  Mrs. Fleming,  but I don't remember just what it was, and as I looked around Fleming was standing with his back to the bar, and Denny was standing up on the foot rail with his revolver within a few inches of Fleming's back.  Before I could move or say a word Denny fired and Fleming dropped on the floor.  Denny then reached over to shoot him again, when I grabbed his arm and took the gun away from him and pushed him on out the door.  He still had the glass of beer in his hand when I took hold of him, and held on to it until we got out on the street, when I first noticed something in his hand, and asked him what it was.  He then threw it down on the ground.  I took him down the alley towards Jackson street and then to Nolan's saloon, where Nolan advised him to go and give himself up.  He and I then walked down to the jail and he gave himself up to  Sheriff Moer."

JAMES  WHITCOMB.

          I was sitting by the stove when Denny came in, and he and Fleming had some words, but I didn't understand just what it was about, for I was back by the stove reading, and they were standing up in front.  I heard Fleming tell him that he had accommodated him by lending him three dollars, and didn't want to have any trouble with him, and would rather he would get out of the house.  Denny then went away and was gone about fifteen or trenty minutes and came back with John Burk.  Denny called for a beer, and I think Burk took a cigar.  Denny and Fleming had some words about something that Denny should have said, and when I looked up Fleming had his back turned to the bar and was making change, or rather looking at a piece of money he had in his hand, and Denny was just in the act of pulling the trigger.  After he shot Fleming dropped on the floor and Denny then reached over to shoot again when Burk caught his arm.  Woordard ran around behind the bar and helped him up, and I went after  Jack McLaughlin."

WILL  MOORE.

          I was sitting in the saloon talking to Ony Kiloran or Jim Whitcomb, I don't remember which, when Denny came in.  Him and Willhad a fuss about something Denny should have said about his (Fleming's) wife, and Fleming told him he wanted him to go out and never come back.  Denny went out and came back in a little while with John Burk and ordered a beer, and Denny wanted Fleming to drink with him, but he wouldn't do it, and while Fleming had his back turned to the bar, and was looking at the money he had picked up off the counter, Denny reached over and shot him.  We helped Fleming up and got him in a chair, and he said he was shot.  I then started after Jack McLaughlin."
          Fleming was in no condition to be interviewed, eight last night or this morning, to any extent, but claimed that Denny had no cause for shooting him, and that the shooting was entirely unexpected.
          Mr. Fleming rested very well last night, requiring only one dose of opiates, to induce sleep, and at noon to-day there were no unfavorable symptoms, and the indications so far point to his recovery.  The bullet struck the top edge of the scapula in the left shoulder and was deflected downwards and slightly forward penetrating the lung, and is supposed to have lodged in the large muscles of the back about over the ninth rib.  The wound is dangerous, but not necessarily fatal.
          The preliminary trial of young Denny will probably be fixed this afternoon for Saturday, Dec. 18, before  Squire Ellis,  on a charge already preferred, of shooting with intent to murder.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Monday, January 25, 1886
------------
L O C A L     N E W S.
------------
          Mr. Will Fleming  of the popular firm of  McLaughlin & Fleming,  will, it is reported on good authority, in about two weeks be joined in matrimony to the handsome  Miss Annie Leslie.  The many friends of the young people will join us in wishing them a long and happy married life.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The Crawfordsville  Weekly  Journal
Montgomery County, Indiana
July 29, 1869
------------
L E G A L     N O T I C E S.
------------
NOTICE  IN  ATTACHMENT. Notice is hereby given, that, on the 8th day of June, A.D. 1869, at the instance of  Julia McCullough,  I,  Richard Canine,  a Justice of the Peace of Union township, Montgomery county, State of Indiana, issued a writ of attachment against the goods, chattels, rights, credits, moneys and effects of  William Fleming,  a non-resident of the State of Indiana.  The said William Fleming will therefore take notice of the pendency of said suit in attachment, and that the same will be tried before me at my office, in the city of Crawfordsville, Indiana, at 10 o'clock A.M. on the 9th day of August, A.D. 1869.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  National  Volunteer
Shelbyville, Indiana
~ * ~ * ~ *~ * ~ * ~
November 24, 1853
          Strayed from William Leming [Fleming?], living 4 1/2 miles below Shelbyville on Blue River, one sorrel horse colt.
Submitted by Sherry Badgley Ryan with permission from Mr. Maurice Holmes.  Selected items from Shelbyville, Indiana Newspaper Excerpts:  1853 - 1859.  Maurice Holmes, 1141N 450W, Shelbyville, IN 46176.


The  Washington  Review  and  Examiner
Washington, Penssylvania
11 Jun 1831
Page 3
------------
          MARRIED - at Shelbyville, (Indiana) on the 10th ult. by the  Rev. Mr. Kent,  Mr. SAMUEL KIRK, of Claysville, Pa. to  Miss ELIZABETH FLEMING, of Shelbyville, formerly of this county.
Contributed by John Addison Ballard

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