Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Haymond


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Wednesday, June 5, 1935
Page 3   column 4
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TWO  WILLS  ARE
PROBATED  HERE
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Prepare to Distribute Estate
of Waldron Man and Woman
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          Will of two Shelby county residents whose deaths occurred within the last week were probated today in the Shelby circuit court.
          Horace H. Haymond  of Waldron filed bond of $3,000 for his services as executor of the will of his uncle, Morton Crisler, who died May 26 at his home in St. Paul.  The estate is valued at $1,500 al in personal property.  The will provides for conversion of that property into cash, for payment of debts and for erection of a monument at the grave of the testator.
          The residue is to be shared equally by Mr. Crisler's twelve nephews and nieces:  Walter Crisler  and  Winona Deiwert,  Greensburg;  Dr. W. R. Crisler, Shelbyville;  Myrtle Palmerton,  Howard Crisler  and  Amy Apple, St. Paul;  Horace Haymond  and  Ray N. Haymond, Waldron;  Chester Crisler, Hammond;  Stanley Crisler, near Fairland;  Paul Crisler, New Bethel and  Fred Haymond, Beech Grove.  The will was signed April 24, 1935, and witnessed by George L. Leffler, Jr.,  and  Cleve Watkins.
          Under the will of  Mrs. Virginia L. Shrout, who died recently in Waldron, a son,  Lee W. Shrout, receives the real estate of personal property of the decedent for his lifetime.  At his death, the property will be shared by the other children of Mrs. Shrout or their heirs.  Household goods, with the exception of certain items given to  Lucy Rees,  Dr. J. W. Shrout,  Nannie Wagoner  and  Ethel McKay is given to [my copy ends here].
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Democrat
Friday, June 26, 1908
Page 3   column 3
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PERSONALS.
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          Miss Dot Haymond  is visiting her sister,  Nettie,  at Greensburg.  During her absence  Miss Grace Ayres  takes her place at the J. H. Meloy printing establishment.
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          Miss Estelle Osborne,  the charming milliner, of Lebanon, Ind., now employed at Sullivan, Ill., is the guest of  Mrs. Frank Haymond,  of this place.  Mrs. Haymond and Miss Osborne are old schoolmates and hard to separate.  Unlucky for the Waldron boys.  There is is none Estelle wants.
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          Captain Lew Haymond,  veteran of Bull's Run, author and philanthropist, was a passenger to Shelbyville.  In the excitement he forgot his coat.  He, however, later located it in a dye house at Shelbyville.  Unluckily for the captain that he is the sole owner of but one garment and has to go to bed while his better half mends his pants.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday November 29, 1900
Page 5 column 2
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MARRIAGE
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Thursday Afternoon of 
Mr. Charles F. Benedict and  Miss Grace Haymond
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          Promptly at 5:30 o'clock Thursday evening accompanied by Mr. Wood Kirk and Miss Hortense HobanMr. Charles F. Benedict  and  Miss Grace Haymond, arrived at the residence of  Mr. and Mrs. George Haymond  on west Hendricks street.  The bridal couple and attendants entered the east parlor, which was tastefully decorated in goldenrod, and faced Rev. Duncan, of the First M.E. Church, who performed the ceremony in the presence of about fifty friends of the bride and groom.  After a few minutes spent in congratulations, the guests were taken to the dining room where a six o'clock dinner was served.  The bride's table was placed in the center of the room, at which were seated the bridal party.  Each table was adorned with American Beauty roses.  The bride was dressed in a dark brown traveling suit of broadcloth, made with Russian blouse, with revers lined with brown satin, and wore a white tucked taffeta waist and brown hat.  She carried bride's roses.  The couple were recipients of many beautiful and useful presents.  Mr. and Mrs. Benedict left on the Knickerbocker for a trip through the East, and on their return will reside on West Franklin street.
Contributed by Barb Huff for Bob McKenzie


The  Shelby  Democrat.
January 8, 1891
-------o-------
          Mr. Joseph Haymond, of Waldron, was in the city Monday morning.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, January 28, 1886
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L O C A L    N E W S.
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          Mrs. George L. Haymond  left on the ten o'clock train last night for Chicago to see her daughter,  Mrs. Mollie Milleson,  whom she was advised by telegraph yesterday, was dangerously ill with typhoid fever.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 27, 1886
Page 3
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          The Duck Club, consisting of  Messrs. Judge Hord  and  Dan Deprez, of this city,  George Wright, of Flatrock,  Sam Stroup  and  Kansas Haymond, of Waldron, and  Ben Jenkins, of St. Paul, will meet at the last named place tomorrow to make arrangements for their annual hunt.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 27, 1886
Page 3
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          The ladies of the Christian Church are requested to meet at the residence of  Mrs. George L. Haymond  Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Saturday, January 31, 1885
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L  O  C  A  L      N  E  W  S.
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          Joe Haymond, of Waldron, is in town.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Republican.
Monday, July 21, 1884.
=======================
LOCAL  NEWS.
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             Lost, yesterday, between the Christian church and the Levinson corner, an old necklace with cameo set.  The finder will please return to the grocery store of George Haymond.
Copied by Marcia Stinson


The  Daily  Republican.
Friday, July 18, 1884
=================
LOCAL  NEWS
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          Miss Jennie  and  Georgie Selby,  of Indianapolis, are the guests of  Miss Alma Haymond,  of this city.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind.
Tuesday, October 2, 1883
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          Miss Effie Haymond  will visit friends in Greensburg this week.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Inter Ocean
Chicago, Illinois
13 Feb 1880
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LEGAL  MATTERS
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Special Telegram to The Inter Ocean.
          SHELBYVILLE, Ind., Feb. 12. -- Mahala Saucer  vs.  Alfred H. Haymond.  Complaint for slander.  Demand, $10,000.  The foregoing is the title of a complaint filed in the County Clerk's office.  The plaintiff is the adopted daughter of  Marcus Chapman,  a well-to-do farmer.  Quite recently, in a breech of promise suit for $5,000 against  Henry Haymond, the jury awarded her $2,000 damages.  The defendant,  Alfred H. Haymond, is a wealthy resident of Waldron.  Miss Saucer sets forth in her complaint that on the 1st day of May, 1878, a contract of marriage was entered into between herself and Henry Haymond, who is the nephew of the present defendant.  She claims that the defendant knew of the existense of this promise, and in order to break it off he circulated malicious reports in regard to her; that the mind of Henry Haymond, to whom she was engaged, was poisoned against her, and he failed to fulfill his agreement.
Contributed by John Ballard


Fort  Wayne  Weekly  Sentinel
15 Oct 1879
Page 4
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          Henry Haymond, of Shelbyville, was arrested last Thursday, by his affianced bride, for having an abortion committed on her.
Contributed by John Ballard


The  Cincinnati  Daily  Gazette
10 Oct 1879
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Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.
          SHELBYVILLE, IND., OCT. 9. -- The arrest of  Henry Haymond,  of Waldron, last night, furnishes a striking example of man's unfaithfulness and woman's weakness, and what the two combined ill sometimes lead to.  In November, 1878, Haymond and  Miss Mehala Saucer,  of the same village, were to be married.  The night arrived on which the happy event was to occur, the feast was spread, the guests assembled, the bride arrayed, and apparently all was well.  But as the moments flew by no Henry came, and all wondered at his tardiness.  Soon it was announced that the young man had run away, and did not intend to fulfill his sacred obligations.  The sad intelligence sent woe to the hearts of all present, and created considerable excitement and indignation, especially on the part of the young lady's personal friends.
          Time passed on and in about three months Haymond returned to his native heath, where in a short time he was confronted by an affidavit, charging him with seduction and bringing suit against him for $5,000.  This occasioned more than a ripple of comment again, but it, like all other things, had its day and then died.  The latest phase of the affair culminated last night, in the arrest of Haymond, charged with procuring an abortion on the 14th of October, 1879.  He waived an examination and was released to $500 bail.  The trial will in all probability come up for hearing during the present term of court.  The parties are both of families of good standing, the lady being a foster daughter of  Marcut Chapman.
Contributed by John Ballard


The  Plain  Dealer
Cleveland, Ohio
18 Nov 1878
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DECEIVED  AND  DESERTED
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Social Sensation in the Village of Waldron,
Indiana -- The Contemptible
Part Played by Henry Haymond.
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Special Dispatch to the Enquirer.
          SHELBYVILLE, IND., November 15. -- The village of Waldron, eight miles southeast of here, is today enjoying the luxury of a decided social sensation.  Last night at six o'clock there was to have been a fashionable wedding at the house of  Mr. Marcus Chapman,  a wealthy and influential farmer, the bride being  Miss Mehala Saucer,  his adopted daughter.  She was engaged to wed Mr. Henry Haymond, a dashing young gentleman about twenty-five years of age, and also member of a family of wealth and social prominence.  This couple had been lovers for two years or more, and the announcement of their approaching nuptials created quite a stir in the tony society of Waldron.
          At the appointed hour last night the wedding guests assembled.  An elegant supper had been prepared, and the lovely Miss Saucer awaited, in full bridal array, the consummation of her happiness.  About eight i'clock a messagner arrived, and, after some mysterious consultation, the dreadful information was whispered around that the bridegroom would not make his appearance, as he had fled to parts unknown.  It was a horrible blow to the bride, who is a very pretty and highly-esteemed young lady, a favorite with all her acquaintances, and the darling of her foster parents.  She is nearly heart broken over the heartless desertion of her chosen lover, while the Chapmans exress great indignation toward the false Henry Haymond and his parents, the latter being charged with aiding and abetting in his escape.  It seems that yound Haymond was willing to fulfill his part of the contract, but that his parents, for some reason or other, were bitterly opposed to his marrying Miss Saucer.
          Your correspondent visited Waldron this afternoon, and found considerable excitement existing over the affair.  The runaway bridegroom is bitterly condemned, and it would not be healthy for him to return home at present.  Owing to the prominence and high social posiiton of all the parties, the unfortunate termination of the anticipated wedding has attracted wide-spread attention.
Contributed by John Ballard

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