The  Indianapolis  News
October 18, 1899
Page 11,  Column 2
----------
CENTENARIAN  DYING
----------
MONROE  HEDGES  IS  SAID
TO  BE  105  YEARS  OLD.
----------
          In a ramshackle hut in the rear of 1012 Rhode Island Street lies an old man, who says he is 105 years old, at the point of death.  The old man is Monroe Hedges, known in the part of the city in which he lives as "Granddad Hedges."  The house in which he lives, with several sons, was at one time a stable.  It has since been turned into a house of two small rooms.  Until Tuesday of last week the old man retained all of his faculties, and pulled himself about the small, dirty yard in a chair.  In some way (the sons could not explain) blood poisoning affected his right arm and leg and gangrene developed.
          Hedges has five sons and one daughter living.  The oldest son, Hiram Hedges, being seventy-one years old.  The youngest member of the family is  James Hedges.  Another member of the family says that James is about forty-five years of age.  The names of the other children are:  Jonas,  Ross,  Dudley  and  Louisianna.  The old man is said to have been born in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, on the site of the court house, 105 years ago the 11th day of last February.  He has often spoken of fighting in a war, but the members of the family can not tell us what war he served.  They think, however, that it was the Mexican War.
          Hedges moved with his family to this city twenty-two years ago.  His wife died about three months ago, eighty-seven years old.  The family lives on a pension paid to Monroe Hedges for the death of a son in the Civil War.
Contributed by Nancy Glover

The  Indianapolis  Star  News
April 13, 1899
Page 2
----------
JOHN  EAKER  AND  FRANK  HEDGES
IN  POLICE  COURT
----------
          John Eaker  and  Frank Hedges were fined $100.00 in costs, with 180 days in the work house for stealing a cow from a pasture in the bottoms west of Mausís Brewery.  The cow was driven to the stock yards where it was offered for sale.  Eaker was asked for references and he said he was well known by Al Taffe, the turn key at the police station.  When called up, Taffe said he knew Eaker, but did not think he ever owned a cow.  It was decided by the stock yard men that the cow was stolen, and the police were called.
Contributed by Nancy Glover

Newspaper Index       Main Page