Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Jones


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
1953
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MR.  AND  MRS.  ORA  JONES
OBSERVE  60TH  ANNIVERSARY
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          Mr. and Mrs. Ora C. Jones  quietly observed their 60th wedding anniversary today at their home near Waldron - on the same farm where Mr Jones was born on June 27, 1871, and where he still is engaged in farming.  Mrs. Jones, who is 80 years of age, was  Miss Ora D. Gillespie  before the marriage, which took place on April 23, 1893, in the home of Reverend R. J. Watts, then pastor of the old Valley Methodist Church.  Mrs. Jones also is a native of Shelby County.  The couple has three children,  Willard A. Jones  of Greensburg,  Mrs. Roy Hoban  of Milroy and  Mrs. Carl Smith  of Indianapolis.  They have six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
Contributed by Marlena Linne


The  Kokomo  Tribune
October 3, 1952
Page 3
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[Pictures]
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MISS  DELORIS  FIPPS
IS  CHRISTMAS  EVE  BRIDE
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COUPLE  WILL  RESIDE
IN  MISSISSIPPI
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          In a double-ring ceremony Christmas Eve in the Main Street Methodist Church,  Miss Deloris Janet Fipps  became the bride of  Richard Lee Wood, United States Air Force.
          Parents of the couple are  Mr. and Mrs. Levon Fipps,  712 S. Calument St.,and  Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wood,  712 E. Morgan St.
          Vows were exchanged at 7:30 p.m. with the  Rev. Byron Stroh  officiating.  Bill Walters  presented an organ prelude including  "I Love You Truly,"  "Because,"  "Always," and  "My Wonderful One."  During the ceremony he played  "The Lord's Prayer."
          Greenery decorated the alter and a silver star shone overhead.  In addition to the alter candles, there were white tapers in seven-branch candelabra.
          Given in marriage by her father, the bride was gowned in white satin styled with a nylon marquisette yoke and a nylon Chantilly lace bodice which had sleeves of lace extended into bridal points over the hands.  Satin and lace covered buttons closed the back opening of the bodice and accented the sleeves at the wrist.  The bouffant satin skirt, with appliqué designs of lace, swept into a chapel train, and the fingertip veil of nylon illusion edged in Chantilly lace, was attached to a heart shaped tiara of Chantilly lace with lily-of-the-valley accent.  The bride wore a double stand of pearls, a gift of the bridegroom and carried a white Bible, given to her by the Mothers of DeMolay, created with two white camellias which had white satin streamers.
          Preceding the bride to the alter were  Mrs. Wayne Wilson,  matron of honor,  Miss Barbara Newlon, Tipton R.R. 2, and  Miss Shirley Ann Phipps, cousin of the bride, bridesmaids.  Mrs. Wilson's ballerina-length gown of French blue satin featured a strapless bodice and nylon net overskirt.  Small satin bows accented the front of the bodice and were scattered over the net skirt.  Her net stole was of matching French blue as were slippers which had appliqués of silver flowers.  She wore a heart shaped tiara of gathered net and carried a colonial bouquet of bronze and yellow mums with matching streamers.
          The bridesmaid’s gowns were identical in design to that worn by the matron of honor and were buttercup in color.  Each had matching headdresses and slippers and their bouquets were also colonial arrangements of bronze and yellow mums with matching streamers.  All three attendants wore gifts of the bride, pearl chokers and earrings in shades to match their gowns.
          Cpl. Wayne Wilson  of Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, Miss., served as best man for the bridegroom, and ushers were  Richard E. Fipps,  United States Navy, brother of the bride, and  Cpl. Bruce Williams, UnitedStates Air Force.
          For her daughter's wedding, Mrs. Fipps chose a dress of royal blue crepe with which she wore black accessories and a white carnation corsage.  The bridegroom's mother wore a crepe dress in plum shades with accessories of winter white.  Her flowers were a corsage of white carnations.  The newly-married couple greeted 100 guests at a reception held in the Fipp's home following the ceremony.  Centering the refreshment table was a three-tier wedding cake ornamented with yellow roses and bluebells to carry out the bridal shades.  A miniature bridal couple was placed atop the cake. The table was covered with white lace, and tapers in double crystal holders flanked the centerpiece.
          Assistants were Mrs. Lewis Newlon,  Mrs. Stanley Stewart  and  Mrs. Roy Dyer.  When the couple left for a wedding trip to an undisclosed destination the bride was wearing a two-piece wool jersey dress in butterscotch shade.  Her accessories were dark brown and her coat was of pink fleece.  After Jan. 2, the couple will be at home at 1610 Oak Ave., Gulfport, Miss., near Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, where the bridegroom is stationed.  The bride, who was graduated from Kokomo High School in 1951, is a member of Gradale Sorority, Job's Daughters, Bethel No. 20, and has been employed as a photographic technician by the Kokomo Tribune.  The bridegroom also graduated from Kokomo High School in 1951.
          Out-of-town guests who attended the ceremony included  Mr. and Mrs. Leo Amrheim  and family,  Mr. and Mrs. George Amrheim  and family, Greensburg,  Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Best  and daughters, Indianapolis;  Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Pickett,  Idaville;  Mr. and Mrs. Bill Jones  and family, Shelbyville;  Mr. and Mrs. Paul Plummer, Windfall;  Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hancock  and family, Delphi.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Shelbyville  Republican
January 29, 1948
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Opens Office
Charles Adams to Be Manager at Greenfield
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          Announcement of the opening of a new office at Greenfield has been made by the Stanly Jones Agency, Inc., of Shelbyville.
          The firm's new office, located in the Weil building, will be managed by  Charles H. Adams, a resident of Greenfield and a member of the Indiana State Police since 1938.  Adams' resignation from the state law enforcement agency will become effective February 1.  Active in church, organization and civic activities for a number of years, Adams is married and has two children.
          The  Stanley Jones Agency,  established here 33 years ago, is opening the new Greenfield office, officials of the firm pointed out, to provide a complete real estate and general insurance service for Hancock county.
          The company's Greenfield office will be formally opened next Monday, February 2.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday December 4, 1924
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          Dr. S. B. Coulson, of Waldron, reports the birth of a nine pound girl at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Jones, born Thursday.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
July 13, 1923
Page 1
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SHELBYVILLE  WOMAN
NINETY-THREE  TODAY
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Mrs. Arthenia[sic]  Jones  Is  One
Among  The  Few  Who  Ob-
serve  Unusual  Event
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          Ninety-three years is a ripe old age, so to speak and there are not many people in this world today who are fortunate enought to travel life's rough highway and reach the age mentioned.  However, Mrs. Parthenia Jones, who resides at 831 Meridian street, is one among the few who has reached her ninety-third birthday.  Today marked the unusual event and in honor of the occasion her many friends, both young and old, were busy extending to her their best of wishes for other birthday anniversaries.
          Altho there was no big celebration held for Mrs. Jones, nevertheless her daughter, Mrs. Dora Turner with whom she resides, served a splendid dinner for a few relatives and friends in honor of her mother.  Mrs. Jones is unusually spry for one of her advanced years and was one of the liveliest guests at the dinner today.
          Mrs. Jones was born and reared in Shelby county and can relate many incidents that occurred when this county was at a very tender age.  She is a pleasing conversationalist and has delighted her friends many times with stories concerning the early days.  Her one aim in life has always been to help others and her generosity is one outstanding trait of her lovely character.  May Mrs. Jones live to celebrate other birthday anniversaries, is the wish of her hundreds of friends.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
July 3, 1922
Page 1
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OLDEST  WOMAN  IN  THIS  COUNTY,
PARTHENIA  JONES, AGE  93  YEARS
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          Mrs. Parthenia Jones, who lives at 831 Meridian street, with her daughter, Mrs. Dora Turner, is the oldest person residing in Shelbyville. Mrs. Jones was born in Decatur county on July 13, 1830 [which would make her 92 in 1922, not 93 - PMF]. In ten days she will celebrate her ninety-third birthday. When she was two years old, or ninety-one years ago, her parents moved to Union township, this county. Since that time practically her entire life has been passed in that township and in this city.
          Usually when stories like this are written the splendid physical condition of the person in question is dwelt upon. When the writer of this narrative called at the Jones home she met him by calling his name, shaking his hand and enquiring about his health and that of his wife. If there is anything wrong with Mrs. Jones she does not know it. She was aked a number of leading questions, answering them all quickly and decisively. When she first lived in Shelbyville it was with her sister, Mrs. Mandy Ashley, whose husband was Herman Ashley, their home being a two-room frame house located on the ground whre the new school house on East Franklin street is being built. Mrs. Jones says it was the only house on the street at that time. Mrs. Jones was asked if she remembered a log jail any place in Shelbyville. Promptly, she said: "Yes, indeed! It stood on the corner where Conrad Schroeder used to have a saloon and it was kept by , father of the Wingate men who used to live here. One day I was at Wingate's playing with their daughter, Martha, who was near my age. There was no one in the jail and the door being open I went in. Martha shut the door and I want to tell you it scared me almost to death." In recounting the early stories of the town she said that Thomas Fleming had a store in a log building on the corner where the clothing store now is. She recalled the woods that stood outside the original town and spoke decidedly of many of the first settlers of Shelbyville. She was born eight years after the county was organized. There is not a cloud on her mind and she is still a wonderful source for information of early Shelbyville. She closed the conversation by saying "there will be big doing here on the Fourth." She was asked if she was going to the fair grounds to which she replied "I would like to go mighty bad but if I do somebody will have to take me out and bring me back."
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday, July 27, 1916
Twenty-Ninth Year  No. 70
Page 1
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          Dr. C. A. Tindall  reports the birth of a five and one-half pound girl baby at the home of  Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Jones,  of 848 Howard street.  The young lady arrived about eight o'clock last night.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, July 27, 1916
Page 6   column 4
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FARMER  INJURED  BY
FALLING  PITCH  FORK
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Henry Jones, of Waldron, Was
Wounded in Right Arm This
Morning -- Wounds Not Serious.
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          Henry Jones  of Waldron, was injured by a pitch fork that ripped his right arm between the elbow and shoulder, while he was unloading a load of hay this morning at about nine o'clock.
          Mr. Jones was out at his farm about three miles west of Waldron at the time and he and his hand had just brought up a load to the barn.  When the wagon stopped, Jones slipped off and went to the rear of the wagon to unfasten the hayloader.
          Dee Rutherford,  his hand, who was on the wagon and who did not notice the movements of Jones, dropped a pitch fork from the the rear end of the load of hay.  One of the prongs struck him a glancing stroke, requiring the services of a physician.
          The wound is not serious enough to keep Mr. Jones at home.  He was in town today on business.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Indianapolis  Star
November 28, 1915
Page 71  Column 7
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Shelbyville
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         Miss Marie Jones  has returned from Indianapolis, where she visited her uncle,  Dr. Thomas Jones,  and her grandmother,  Mrs. Cynthia Jones.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
November 27, 1915
Page 11  Column 4
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Briefs  From  Over  The  State
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         SHELBYVILLE -- Raymer Sexton,  son of former Postmaster  Elisha Sexton, and  Miss Marie Jones, daughter of  Mrs. Charles Moberly, eloped to Newport, Ky., Friday and were married there.  The bride is a granddaughter of  Mrs. Cynthia Jones  of Indianapolis.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla

The  Indianapolis  Star
May 9, 1915
Page 11
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Edward Jones  of Hammond is here, visiting  Mrs. Margaret Jones  and family.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
November 2, 1914
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          Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Jones, of Elm street, entertained to dinner Sunday  Mr. and Mrs. William Warble  of Fenns;  Mr. and Mrs. James S. Collins,  Mrs. Laura Foxworthy  and daughters  Reba and Lou  and son  Harry.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday Afternoon, January 19, 1914.
Page 1   column 3-4
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SLANDEROUS  RUMOR
PROVED  TO  BE  FALSE
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In Every Particular -- Vague
Rumors in Regard to Mrs.
Stanley Jones Untrue --
Made Out of Whole Cloth
By Malicious Persons, Evi-
dently Bent on Injuring
Another's Good Name.
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          I note in your issue of Thursday last that a well known lady of the city some time ago purchased two dresses of L.S. Ayers Company, of Indianapolis, and at such time falsely represented herself to be the sister of  Mrs. Chris Steinhauser  of this city and had the amount of such purchase charged to Mr. Steinhauser's account.  The article states that the person who made these representations and purchase is known, but her name is not disclosed.  I understant that several ladies have been connected with this charge, and in view of the fact that certain false and malicious rumors have been circulated concerning Mrs. Jones in connection with the same, I am sending you this communication for the purpose of clearing her name of this unfounded charge.  It seems that these reports have been freely circulated for weeks, but the same did not come to my knowledge nor to the knowledge of Mrs. Jones until a few days ago, when one of our friends informed us of these rumors.  Immediately we mae an investigation and interviewed Mr. and Mrs. Steinhauser, each of whom emphatically said that Mrs. Jones was never at any time, suspected of this charge and had no connection with the matter whatever.
          Also on Friday afternoon, Mrs. Jones and I went to see the clerk who sold the dresses to the person who made the purchase of the dresses, and he promptly and voluntarily stated that Mrs. Jones was not the lady to whom he had sold the goods and that she had no connection whatever with the matter.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Steinhauser and the Ayers clerk offered to make affidavits to this effect, and I submit the following sworn statements which, I think, should forever put an end to the false and unfounded gossip concerning Mrs. Jones in connection with this affair.
Affidavit of Chris Steinhauser.
State of Indiana, Shelby County, ss,
          The undersigned, Chris Steinhauser, states that he has been informed that certain rumors have been circulated reflecting upon Mrs. Stanley Jones in connection with the purchase of certain dress goods of L.S. Ayers & Co., of Indianapolis, in the month of July 1913, by a person who represented herself to be the sister of Mrs. Steinhauser and had said goods charged to the account of the undersigned.
Affidavit of Carros Steinhauser.
          The undersigned, Carros Steinhauser, states that she is the wife of Chris Steinhauser, of Shelbyville, Indiana.  That she has been informed that certain rumors have been circulated reflecting upon Mrs. Stanley Jones in connection with the purchase of certain dress goods of L.S. Ayers & Co., of Indianapolis, in the month of July, 1913, by a person who represented herself to be a sister of this affiant.
          The undersigned states that after the purchase of said goods, she and her husband and the L.S. Ayers Co. made some investigation for the purpose of determining who made the above representations and purchase, but that at no time was any suspicion directed toward Mrs. Stanley Jones in connection with said purchase and representations and that said rumors arose without the knowledge of the undersigned and are absolutely unfounded.
          Said affiant makes this statement in justice to Mrs. Jones and for the purpose of clearing her name of the false and unfounded rumors that have been circulated against her in connection with said matter.
CARROS  STEINHAUSER
          Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of January, 1914.
(seal)               FRANK H. WOLFE
                    Notary Public.
              My commission expires April 20, 1916.

Affidavit of Walter D. Feltman
State of Indiana, Marion County, ss:
          The undersigned, Walter Feltman, states that he is now and for several months past, has been in the employ of L.S. Ayers & Co., of Indianapolis, Ind., as salesman at the dress goods counter in said company's store on Washington street in said city.
          That during the month of July, 1913, some lady representing herself to be the sister of Mrs. Chris Steinhauser, of Shelbyville, Ind., purchased some dress goods of the undersigned and had the same charged to the said Chris Steinhauser.
          The undersigned is informed that certain rumors have been circulated relfecting upon Mrs. Stanley Jones, of Shelbyville, Indiana, in connection with said purchase to the effect that she was the person who made the above representations and purchse.  The undersigned states upon his oath that he has seen and knows Mrs. Stanley Jones, and that she is not the person who made said representations or said purchase, and affiant says that she was not connected with the same in anyway, and that any reflections upon her in connection with said transctions are unfounded and unjust in every particular.
WALTER  FELTMAN.     
          Subscribed and sworn to before me this the 16th day of January, 1914.
(seal)             JEWEL  CLARK,
                Notary Public.
          My commission expires July 1, 1917.
Affidavit of Mrs. Bess Jones.
State of Indiana, Shelby County, ss:
          I  Bess Jones,  make oath that at no time in my life did I purchase any goods at Ayers & Co's. store at Indianapolis, Ind.,and have the same charged to Mr. Chris Steinhauser, of Shelbyville, Ind.  That I never at any time impersonated any other person anywhere, nor for any purpose, and never at any time represented to anyone that I was the sister of Mrs. Chris Steinhauser.  That I never received goods purchased on the credit of Mr. Steinhauser and know nothing about the matter of any sale to any person of goods on his credit.
BESS JONES.
          Subscribed and sworn to before me this the 17th day of January, 1914.
E. W.  LEWIS,
Notary Public.
          My commission expires February 1, 1916.

          I ask that you publish this statement for the purpose of refuting these imputations against Mrs. Jones and proving that she had not the slightest connection in any way with this matter.  I would not give this matter the publicity that I am now asking were it not for the fact that these rumors reflecting on Mrs. Jones and other persons have gone broadcast over this community, and a public refutation seems to be the only remedy.
STANLEY  JONES.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, August 24, 1911
Page 4   column 2
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NEWS   NOTES
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          Miss Hazel Jones  has gone to Connersville to spend a week with relatives and friends.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, October, 22, 1909.
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          C. E. Jones  was a passenger to Indianapolis Friday morning.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
May 31, 1909
Page 5
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          Peter Jones  and  Bert Lowe,  of Waldron, went to St. Paul last Friday on a "speeder."  While returning they hit a buck in which  Mrs. John Baeuer  was riding, but no serious damage resulted.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
August 13, 1908
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          Mrs. Bessie Jones  is in the city with her sister, Mrs. F. G. Blackburn, from Columbus, Ohio.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
August 13, 1908
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         Alvin Jones  is in the city today from Brandywine township.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Democrat
Friday, June 26, 1908
Page 3   column 3
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PERSONALS.
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          Dun McClain,  graduate of Purdue university, is visiting his class and room-mate,  Ray Jones,  at this place.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, October 3, 1905
Page 1
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MARRIED  AT  NOON
WERE  WILLIAM  STANLEY  JONES
AND  MISS  BESS  TROUT
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After Ceremony Newly Married Ones
Leave For a Short Wedding Trip.
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DETAILS  OF  THE  WEDDING.
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          A beautiful autumn wedding occurred on Tuesady[sic] at the home of  Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Trout, in east Mechanic street, when their daughter, Bess Adaline, became the bride of  Mr. William Stanley Jones, of Indianapolis.
          The ceremony was performed by the Rev. L. F. Dimmit, at high noon, in the presence of about seventy-five relatives and friends of the young couple.
          The house was decorated with Fall flowers, wedding bells and foliage plants and an improvised alter of ferns, intermingled with white roses formed a back ground for the wedding party.
          Miss Trout wore her traveling gown, which was a royal purple tailor suit with hat to match.  She carried white roses and her only attendants, two little flower girls, Mary Hilligoss  and  Mildred Nading, were dressed alike in white.
          An elegant wedding breakfast was served to the guests at the conclusion of the ceremony.
          Mr. and Mrs. Trout were assisted in receiving by  Mrs. Jones  and  Miss Ethel Jones, mother and sister of the groom.
          Those present from out of town included  Mr. and Mrs. Allison,  Miss Fan Allison,  Mr. and Mrs. Griffith,  Mr. and Mrs. Green,  Mr. Chester Ryker  and  Mr. Phaff [Pfaff], all of Indianapolis.
          Mr. and Mrs. Jones left at 2:30 on a short honeymoon, after which they will go to Indianapolis to reside.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, September 7, 1905
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NOTICE  OF  APPOINTMENT.
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State of Indiana, Shelby County, ss:
          Notice is hereby give that on the 15th day of August, 1905, Amos L. Jones  was by the Shelby Circuit Court appointed administratrix of the estate of  Francis L. Jones, deceased, and that said estate is probably solvent.
        This 15th day of August, 1905.
AMOS  L.  JONES    Administrator   .
E. W. McDaniel, Atty.                                                         aug 31-w3

Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming



The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday February 2, 1905
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          Mary B. Jones  VS  Scott Jones. Divorce and custody of child.  Trial finding and judgment granting divorce as prayed and custody of minor child,  Floyd Jones, on payment of costs.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, March 12, 1903
Page 1, column 4
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WILL  PROBATED
That of Samuel Jones of Morristown
Passes Scrutiny of Proper Officers
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          The will of  Samuel Jones late of Morristown, dated August 25, 1903, was probated Monday.  It provides for the payment of the testator's just debts, bequeaths to his widow, Laura A. Jones, all his personal property, including household furniture and kitchen ware, also lot No.28, in Johnson's fourth addition to town of Morristown, for her natural life time, she to keep the buildings theron in good repair and insured.  At her death the lot is to go to her parents if living for their natural life, and at their death, according to a codicil to the will date November 25, 1902, the lot descends to the son John Jones, and his grandson, Romeo Hargrove, combined the survivor to inherit the whole lot.  The testator then directs that upon his death all the residue of his estate shall be sold and the proceeds $500 shall be paid to his grandson, Romeo Hargrove, and the remainder be equally divided between his widow and son, John Jones.  John Jones is named as executor.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, September 26, 1899
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          Mrs. Malinda Jones  is here from Columbus, a guest of  Mrs. Margaret Jones,  on West Hendricks-st.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
December 24, 1891
Page 4   Column 3
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LOCAL  NEWS.
==========
          Mr. Ben Jones  has traded his livery stock for eighty four acres of land near Hope.  The farm originally belonged to Mr. Jones' parents, and the trade was made with  Messrs. Frank Jones  and  Ed Weisner, two of the heirs.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday April 15, 1886
Page 1 column 6
------------
          Not long ago there moved out west from near Smithland this county, a man whose name is recorded in the family bible as follows:  Thomas P. Didymus Christopher Tiown Doctor John Franklin Edward B. Jones.
Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, January 21, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Mrs. Dr. T. S. Jones  and baby, of Flatrock, are quite ill.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Monday, January 18, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Marshal Jones,  who is said to be the best blacksmith in the country, is working for  Frank Talbert.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Volunteer
Thursday, October 4, 1877
Page 3   column 3
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          We learn that  Peter N. Jones  of Corinth, Owen County, Ky. got into an altercation recently, with one  A. Z. Morgan,  and struck the latter a blow which resulted in his instant death.  Mr. Jones was formerly one of our townsmen and much respected by all who knew him.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  National  Volunteer
SHELBYVILLE, INDIANA
~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~
June 15, 1854
          B. B. Jones of Bartholomew County, advertised for sale Zimmerman Separators.
Abstracted by Maurice Holmes, in his book Shelbyville, Indiana, Newspaper Excerpts: 1853-1859.  Submitted by Sherry Badgley Ryan, with permission from the author.

The  National  Volunteer
Shelbyville, Indiana
~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~
February 9, 1854
          Run away - - from R. B. RoanIsaac J. Jones indentured apprentice, age about 18 years old.
Copied by Sherry Badgley Ryan from Shelbyville, Indiana Newspaper Excerpts by Maurice Holmes, with permission from the author.

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