Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Kennedy


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday Afternoon, April 7, 1924
Page 2
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          Fred Kennedy  left Sunday for New York City to spend a few days on business.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
October 27, 1917
Page 1
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SHELBY  COUNTY  SOLDIERS
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Each to Be Supplied With Pair Socks
Knit by Shelby County Women.
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          Ten dozen pairs of socks for the Red Cross have been neatly finished and sterilized and are now ready at the home of Mrs. Sam Kennedy on east Washington street.  The women who have been knitting at her home for the past few months completed 184 pairs for Indiana soldiers some time ago.  While they were waiting for more yarn from headquarters so they could go on with that work they decided to spend their time working for the Red Cross and they lost no time in beginning work for that organization with this splendid result.
          Now they intend to begin working to supply every soldier boy from this county with a pair of socks made to measure.  They are desirous of obtaining the names of every boy from Shelby county who is serving his country.
          When the ladies met for their last meeting at Mrs. Kennedy's home there were 75 present some of them being from Morristown and Fairland.  Fifteen pounds of yarn was distributed in 115 skeins.  The enthusiasm is at a white heat just as it has been ever since the women conceived the idea of meeting regularly to knit.  Three hundred four pairs of socks for the soldiers is nothing to what they will accomplish, they say.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday Afternoon, February 13, 1913
Page 1, column 1
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          Mr.  Fred W. Kennedy  left Wednesday afternoon for Nashville, Tenn., on business connected with the Kennedy Carliner and Bag Co.  This business is growing very rapidly.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday, February 12, 1912
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ENGINEER  STRUCK  ON  THE  FOREHEAD
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ACCIDENT  OCCURRED  WHILE  TRAIN,  EAST  BOUND,
WAS  COMING  TO  THIS  CITY ---- CABOOSE  ALSO  ON  FIRE.
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          When one of the east-bound freight trains on the Big Four arrived here last night, from Indianapois, all kinds of trouble was reported which had occurred between Fairland and this city.  Engineer Julius Swifel, of Indianapolis, had occasion to put his head out of the window while the train was bound for this city, and when he did so he was struck on the forehead by something which cut an ugly gash.  When the train arrived here he went to the office of Dr. Samuel Kennedy, who is the company's local physician, and had the wound dressed, six stitches being taken to close it.  Mr. Swifel returned to Indianapolis and another man took the train the remainder of the trip.
         While the train was coming to this city Conductor Burke and a brakeman were busily engaged in extinguishing a fire in the caboose, the redhot stove causing the floor to ignite, and it was burning at a lively rate when discovered.  They used the contents of the fire extinguisher and the water that remained in a jug, and then had to secure an axe and cut around the burning part of the floor before they finally got rid of the fire.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, February 15, 1906
page 1
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CLEVER  VALENTINE  PARTY.
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Mrs. William McConnell Entertained the
Aid Society of the Boggstown Presbyterian Church.
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          On last Wednesday afternoon Mrs. William McConnell entertained the Aid Society of the Boggstown Presbyterian church and a few invited frieds[sic] at her home in Sugar Creek township.  It being near Valentine's Day, a valentine program had been prepared.  The members answering roll-call with valentine verses, many of them causing considerable mirth.
          Interesting papers bearing on the subject of the origin and customs of Valentin Day were read by  Mrs. Fred Hack  and  Mrs. J. G. Kennedy.  Mrs. Dr. Boone  read a beautiful and pathetic valentine story which was greatly enjoyed.
          A short social time followed when Mrs. McConnell invited the guests to the dining room, which had been made very beautiful for the occasion, the decorations being in read and white.  The center piece being especially attractive consisted of a very prettily decorated red box from which radiated in all directions red paper hearts attached by baby ribbons to a mysterious something in the box.
          Elegant refreshments suggestive of the day were served in two courses after which each lady was given a skein of yarn and asked to wind into a ball and as she wound to tell the story of a true incident of her life.  Mrs. Lynn Burnside proved the most interesting story teller and received as a reward a very beautiful valentine.
          As Mrs. McConnell will soon leave this community to become a resident of Greenwoood[sic], she will knit the yarn wound into balls by her friends into a shwal as a remembrance of them and of the day.  The guests were then invited to step to the table and draw a heart from the center piece and the "mysterious something" to which they were attached proved to be comic valentines which provoked a great deal of merriment.
          The guests left at a late hour feelingfi[sic] they had been royally entertaned and while all regret that it will be the last meeting of the society with Mrs. McConnell in dear old countyr home, all heartily unite in wishing her much joy and happiness in her new home.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, November 16, 1905
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          S. F. Kennedy  left Saturday for Marion to look after some business.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
December 24, 1903
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          Dr. T. C. Kennedy and  J. B. Hamilton visited Indianapolis Friday evening.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
February 19, 1903
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COTERIE
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Treated to Pleasant Surprise
Friday Evening.
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Prof. D. Coate Lectured Upon Wadsworth,
Giving Sketches of the Life
and Some Interesting Readings.
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          The members of the Coterie were treated to a very pleasant surprise Friday evening at the home of  Mrs. T. C. Kennedy  by a committee consisting of Mrs. Kennedy and  Misses Anna Caruthers  and  Elizabeth Young.  The club had previously voted for an extra meeting to give to  Mr. D. O. Coate  time for the third of a series of lectures on the Lake Poets, which he has been giving before the club.  The members were asked to meet promptly at 7:30 o'clock and when they arrived they found with them as guests  Mesdames Pugh,  Levinson  and Seiler  and  Misses Eva Wingate,  Richards  and  Harrison,  Miss Alma Conner,  of Greensburg, and  Miss Jennie Richards,  of Richmond, Ind.  Mr. Coate lectures upon Wadsworth, giving sketches of his life, critisms from various authorities and readings from and discussions upon the following poems:  "The World is too much with us,"  "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge. September 3rd,"  "Imitations of Immoratality,"  "Lines on Tintern Abbey,"  "Lucy Poems,"  "We are Seven,"  "She was a Phantom of Delight,"  "The Primrose of the Rock,"  "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud"  and  "A Poet's Epitaph."  Mr. Coate's literary work is of the highest order and his discussions have been exceedingly interesting and profitable to the club.  At the close of the lecture the president,  Mrs. O. W. Cotton,  presented to Mr. Coate, in behalf of the club, a beautiful copy of Raphael's "Sistine Madonna,"  as a mark of appreciation in which it holds Mr. Coate's work with them.  It has certainly benefited each one and given them power to appreciate in higher degree, the works of one of the best of English poets.  The committee served delicious refreshments in two courses, and presented to each one, as a souvenir, a heart and arrow with beautiful sketches hand-painted in water colors.  All of the members and guests feel most grateful to the committee and Mr. Coate for a most enjoyable evening.  It is no more than just, we think, to say that the water colors were the work of the pupils of ....
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Friday, August 12, 1898
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          Kennedy & Son will receive wheat on deposit for bread or storage on the usual terms. 1 8t 
Copied by Lorraine Llewellyn


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, August 4, 1896
Page 4   column 1
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          Mrs. J. G. Kennedy  conducted a most delightful Young People's Society Christian Endeavor service at 7:30 p.m. last evening, in the parlors of the First Presbyterian Church.  The topic lesson, "Little Kindnesses," was, in a very pretty manner, elegantly discussed by the good lady, showing where christians make many mistakes, during their journey through life, in not speaking a kind word to those whom they chance to come in contact with, followed by a number of testimonials, bearing upon subject, by different members.  Mrs. Dr. Harry M. Toner  presiced at the instrument, and rendered several delightful numbers.  The attendance [the article continues].
Contributed by Barb Huff and Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
January 23, 1896
Page 3 column 2
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          Dr. Thomas C. Kennedy  has been re-appointed Surgeon, at this point, for the Pennsylvania Railroad company.  Dr. Kennedy has been in the companyis service five years, and his re-appointment speaks of the high favor, in which he is held and shows the confidence which the road officials place in the Doctor as a Surgeon.
Contributed by Phyllis Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
July 28, 1894
Page 4   column 1
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          Miss Anna Kennedy  last evening entertained a number of young friends in honor of her guest,  Miss Whitsen,  of Indianapolis.  Seven or eight couple[s] were present.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming



The  Shelbyville  Democrat
December 8, 1892
Page 3
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          George W. Kennedy & Son  say the new corn taken in so far is in excellent condition.  These men are fixed to handle corn as handily as it can be done.  Get their prices before you sell.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind.
June 6, 1892
Page 4
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          Special attention given to the eye, ear, nose, throat and fitting glasses.  Office hours, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., 7 to 8 p.m.  Dr. T. C. Kennedy, office over  Goulding's clothing store, Shelbyville, Ind.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
October 8, 1891
Page 3
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          Special attention given to the eye, ear, nose, throat and fitting glasses.  Office hours 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., 7 to 8 p.m.  Dr. T. C. Kennedy, office over  Bliss & Swain's  clothing store, Shelbyville, Indiana.
Copied by Susan Kelley


The  Daily  Republican
November 22, 1888
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GEO. W. KENNEDY.                     JAS. B. KENNEDY.  
S T A R    R O L L E R    M I L L S.
M I L L E R S
And Dealers in Grain.
Buy all kinds of GRAIN and pay the highest price at all time
for good milling wheat. We also keep
The best flour to sell and exchange
For Wheat.
G  W  KENNEDY  &  SON,
Near C.I.St.L. & C.R.R., Shelbyville.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Saturday, January 16, 1886
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          Mrs. Dr. T. C. Kennedy  went to Dublin, Ind., yesterday to attend the funeral of a relative.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Saturday, January 31, 1885
Page 4, Column 1
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L  O  C  A  L      N  E  W  S.
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          Dr. T. C. Kennedy  leaves to-night for Dublin, Ind., to see his sweet girl.
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Ibid.
Page 4, Column 2
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          Jim Kennedy  had a narrow escape from a horrible death at the Star Mills between five and six o'clock last night.  The rollers through which the grain is run became choked, and in examining them Him had the ends of two fingers on his right hand caught between them, but tore them loose before his hand and arm was drawn in, which would have caused fatal injuries.  As it was he escaped with two fingers badly mashed.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Tuesday, October 24, 1882
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          Marriage licenses were issued this morning to  Alexander J. Kennedy  and  Mary Story (Maud S.);  Jacob Etter  and  Magdelena Eckstine.  The first-named couple were married this afternoon by  'Squire A. J. Higgins,  and the second couple by  Rev. Father Torbeck  at 8 o'clock this morning.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Kalamazoo  Gazette
November 12, 1880
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NEWS  ITEMS
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          Edward Kennedy, who shot  Sheriff McCorkle, at Shelbyville, Indiana, on the eve of the state election, has been seen near Shreveport, La.
Contributed by John Addison Ballard

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