Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Major


The  Shelbyville  News
Wednesday, March 5, 2003
Lifestyles Section
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          Ron Hamilton wrote an article about Charles Major's novel,  When Knighthood Was in Flower.  The article should be available online (in the search engine, use the date and section information above) as well as on microfilm.  Due to copyright laws, we cannot republish the article on this website.


 
The  Shelbyville  Republican
April 14, 1926
Page 1
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MAJOR  PROPERTY  SOLD.
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          The Shelbyville Trust Company, executor of the estate of  Mrs. Alice S. Major, has sold the Major residence in North Harrison street, to  Enos Porter  [the article continues but my copy stops here.]
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Saturday Afternoon, March 20, 1926
Page 1
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ALFRED  MAJOR  STILL  MISSING
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Search Made About Danville And In 
Indianapolis By Friends and Police.
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MRS.  MAJOR  BROUGHT  HERE
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          No word had been received today of  Alfred Major, former resident of Shelbyville, who disapeared[sic] Thursday from his home near Danville, Indiana.  Mr. Major left Danville for Indianapolis to order supplies for his drug store.  He was in Indianapolis for the order was placed by him for the supplies.  No trace of him has been found since he left the order for the goods.
          Mrs. Major was brought here today by her niece, Miss Helen Reid, of Chicago, and was taken to the home of her brother and sister, James Neighbors, and  Mrs. Ollie Morrison, in West Hendricks street.  Mrs. Major is in ill health.
          A search of territory near Danville has been made by residents of the town.  Indianapolis police have been asked to watch for Mr. Major.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, August 5, 1924
Page 8   column 1
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          Miss Ethel Major  has resumed her duties at the Security Trust & Savings Co., after a two weeks' vacation.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Indianapolis  Star
October 24, 1915
Page 51  Column 7
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SHELBYVILLE.
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         Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Major  are at Terre Haute, visiting the  Rev. L. O. Richmond  and family.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
September 26, 1915
Page 54   Column 4
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Mrs. Frances Seiler  and daughter,  Miss Mary,  of New York are guests of  Mrs. Charles Major  here.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
May 2, 1915
Page 24, Column 7
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Major,  W. A. Major  and Harry Major  have returned from their trip in the South and West.  They visited the expositions at San Francisco and San Diego, Cal.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Saturday Afternoon, February 15, 1913
Page 1
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CHARLES  MAJOR'S  FUNERAL  TODAY
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CONDUCTED  BY  REV. L. O. RICHMOND
OF  TERRE  HAUTE ---- ONLY  RELATIVES
AND  A  FEW  INTIMATE  FRIENDS
PRESENT ---- BODY  TO  BE  CREMATED
AT  CINCINNATI.
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         The funeral services of  Charles Major  were held this afternoon and were private, only his relatives and very closest friends of the family being in attendance.  The services were in charge of the Rev. L. O. Richmond, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Terre Haute, the minister being a former resident of this city and in charge of the Presbyterian church here.  He was closely associated with the deceased.  ollowing the services the body was taken to the New York Central depot where it was taken to Cincinnati for cremation.
         The pall bearers were  Harry Teal,  Dr. Sam Kennedy,  Charles Tatman,  Dr. H. C. Sexton,  Henry S. Cory  and  Harry S. Downey.  The pall bearers went to Cincinnati with the remains.
         Those present from a distance attending the funeral were  Thomas A. Swain  and wife, of Indianapolis;  Mr. and Mrs. Harry Saylor  and their son,  John Saylor,  Dr. and Mrs. J G. Reid,  of Chicago;  Mr. and Mrs. Philip Shaw  and  Mrs. Ed Major, of Indianapolis;  George Major, a nephew, from the state of Washington;  Mr. and Mrs. Warren Bigler, of Wabash;  Dr. Chas. Hodell, of Baltimore, Md.;  Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Reid,  of Anderson;  Judge and Mrs. L. J. Hackney  of Cincinnati, and  Dr. W. E. Stone,  President of Purdue University.
         The funeral services were especially appropriate.  No pomp, no showy ceremonies, just a quiet, unostentatious gathering of his relatives and close friends.  Everything was just as Mr. Jamor himself would have wished it.  As it was in life, so it was in death.  He was surrounded by those who knew him, those who loved him for himself.  These relatives and friends have no fear, all is well with Charles Major.  As Pope so well says:
"Peace to thy gentle shade and endless rest!
Blest is thy genius, in thy love too, blest."
And with Longfellow we can say:
"There is no death!  what seems so is transition;
This life of mortal breath
Is but a suberb of the life elysian,
whose portals we call Death."
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday Afternoon, February 14, 1913
Page 1
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REPORT  IS  UNTRUE
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Statement That Mrs. Charles Major Is Very Ill, Unfounded.
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         The report has been sent out and has been published that Mrs. Charles Major, since th death of Mr. Major, has become very ill and that her condition is considered somewhat serious.  Information comes from Dr. T. G. Green denying that this statement is in the least true.
         Mr. Major was a member of the first class that graduated from the Shelbyville high school, and the Shelbyville Alumni Association has held a meeting and a committee composed of  Mrs. Samuel P. McCrea,  Harry Morrison  and  Herbert Jones  was selected to draft resolutions of condolence and place them in the hands of Mrs. Major.  The widow of Mr. Major is also a member of the association, but not of the same class that Mr. Major belonged to.
         Mr. Major was a member of the Elks, the Masons and the Modern Woodmen, but was not an active lodge man.
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PHYSICIAN'S  NAME  OMITTED
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Dr. Samuel Kennedy Also Attended at Illness of Late Author.
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         The Republican in its article of Thursday in regard to the death of our greatly beloved citizen, Charles Major, failed to mention the name of Dr. Samuel Kennedy, who had the case under his charge beginning early.
          Dr. Kennedy and Dr. Thomas G. Green were both faithful attendants of Mr. Major during his illness.  The Republican regrets very much that Dr. Kennedy's name failed to appear in the account of the illness of the deceased, and we take this opportunity of making this announcement.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming
====================
CHARLES  MAJOR;   AN  APPRECIATION
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SOMETHING  OF  WHAT  A  BIG,  BROAD  MINDED,
GENEROUS, SYMPATHIZING  MAN
WAS  TO  OTHERS.
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         In the death of Charles Major, Indiana loses one of her greatest citizen and Shelbyville her greatest.  His achievements spread throughout the English speaking world the fame of Indiana literature and added another star to the galaxy of noted American men of letters.  He placed Shelbyville upon a pinnacle she had never occupied before and which in all probability she will never occupy again.  Such a loss is irreparable.
         But great as is the loss to Shelbyville and to Indiana it is as nothing compared to the loss of those who had the good fortune to be associated with him in such intimacy that they learned to know the man that lived beneath that intellect, the heart that beat beneath that brain.  We may respect and be awed by the mighty intellect, but it is only the heart that calleth forth love; and only the heart that feels love can inspire it.  Charles Major was "Uncle Charley" to many children who loved him because they knew themselves beloved -- in that even the smallest child cannot be deceived.  Never was he happier than when surrounded by little ones.
         We all know of Charles Major's life, that is, the outward life, we all know the sincerity and friendliness that marked his way.  But there was another life --- for he led a double one --- that was known to only a few, and in all its richness it could be known only to himself.  Riches are properly measured not by external but by internal possessions.  True wealth is carried in a man's heart and brain and soul, not in his pocketbook.  'Tis he who thinks the most and feels the most that lives the most, not he who most successfully digs and deives.  Our actions, our passions, all the impulses that go to make up a material life, we share with the rest of the animal creation.  In our thoughts alone are we godlike.
         In that godlike attribute of thinking and in that highest form of all thought --- the exercise of the imagination --- Charles Major was wealthy beyond anyone the writer has ever known.  He lived only one life, really only a part of one, yet into those few years how many other lives were compressed.  His creations were not to him the mere abstractions they are to some writers, they were flesh and blood and bone.  Therein lay his power.  No character was ever created in literature that did not first live in all its beauty, in all its force, in the imagination of the creator.  Nay, it has to live in the author's brain in even greater beauty, in even greater force, for the human powers of expression are so feeble that much is inevitably lost in the telling.
         Here are a few lines from a beautiful introduction to one of his books that tell more strongly than can I of the wealth of his inner life:
         "While the cauldron boils, their cloud forms grow ever more distinct and definite, till at length I can trace their every feature.  I see the color of their eyes.  I discern the shades of their hair.  Some heads are streaked with gray, others are glossy with the sheen of youth.  As a climax to my conjurations I speak the word of all words magical, 'Dorothy,' and lo!  as though god had said, 'Let there be light,' a fair radiant girl steps from the portals of Haddon Hall and illumines all my ancient company so that I may see even the workings of their hearts."
         Those were not mere words to Charles Major, they were emotions of his own soul, emotions that in all their beauty, in all their virility, we can never feel.  He lived them daily.  He saw as he says even the workings of their hearts and therefrom came his great store of sympathy.  No one who lacks imagination can truly sympathize.  That he could and did anyone can attest who ever went to him in trouble.  His strong, unswerving friendship made one think better of the whole human race.
         The Bible says:  "A prophet is not without honor save in his own country and among his own kin."  I do not think that was true of Charles Major.  He was honored and beloved by many in Shelbyville and the better he was known the more he was beloved.  If ever a just man spoke harsh words of him, they were spoken in ignorance.  To know the man, really to know the man, was but to love him, there could be no other feeling.
         And yet that old Bible saying is true in one sense.  We never appreciate the blessings of the present until Fate has banished them into the past.  Many a night have I sat entranced by the glowing pictures conjured up by his brilliant mind or moved by emotions transposed from his own soul.  He was the most interesting, the most entertaining, the most lovable man I have ever known.  I have recognized those truths for years yet I think now in my great loss I never appreciated him as he deserved.  And as I look forward to the years to come I know I shall never find one to replace him.  Poor misguided human hearts, why are we not made better?  Why, to feel the full force of love, must we first lose?
         The closing words from one of his own books may well be quoted here in conclusion:
         "The fire ceases to burn, the flames are sucked back into the earth; the doe's blood has boiled away; the cauldron cools, and my shadowy friends --- so real to me --- whom I love with a passionate tenderness beyond my power to express, have sunk into the dread black bank of the past, and my poor, weak wand is powerless to recall them for the space of even one fleeting moment.  So I must say ---- farewell."
H. C. S.
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         George Major,  a nephew of the late Charles Major, who resides in Kentucky, is here to attend the funeral services of the late lawyer-author.
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AUTHORS  LAMENT  DEATH  OF  MAJOR
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JAMES  WHITCOMB  RILEY,  BOOTH TARKINGTON
AND  MEREDITH  NICHOLSON  PAY  TRIBUTE
TO  LATE  NOVELIST'S  WORK.
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END  WAS  LITTLE  EXPECTED
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Brother Writer Recalls Popularity Enjoyed by "When Knighthood Was in Flower."
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         When the news of the death of Charles Major was conveyed to his friends and acquaintances in Indianapolis, and especially among his brother-writers in that city, they gave deepest expression of regret.
         "Charles Major was a man of rare affability --- cheery and wholesome and brave," said James Whitcomb Riley.  "He deserved a great measure of his success in all particulars, and it is no wonder that he succeeded for the work found him.  All his pleasure and inclination and will and zest bent to his literary task, and so it was that his chosen vocation --- the law --- was necessarily forced aside by his writing.  And happily, too, for he has reflected credit on the state of his birth and left a lasting impression to his own honor and renown."
         "I am greatly grieved to hear of Charles Major's death," said Booth Tarkington.  "It seems only a little while ago that he was in robust health.  I have been in his company but a few times.  I have known him little, but have appreciated him much."
Praised by Nicholson

         "I was greatly shocked to hear recently that Mr. Major's health was impaired, as he always seemed unusually vigorous and a man who enjoyed life to the full," said Meredith Nicholson.  "My last meeting with him was at Mackinac Island, a year ago last summer.  For many years he had been an annual visitor to the Island, where he was well known to all the summer colony.  The last time I talked with him he expressed his wish to own a house on the island, and discussed a number of eligible sites with this in mind.  He knew Mackinac and its lore thoroughly and was deeply interested in its romantic history.
         "Mr. Major was a lifelong student of history.  He had accumulated a large and valuable historical library, and it was through his devotion to English history that he became a writer of romance.  I cannot recall that he had written for publication before the launching of "When Knighthood Was In Flower," which is one of the most popular tales ever written by an American author.  This was not only a highly successful story, but it caused an immediate revival in the historical novel.
         "The play made from the novel for Miss Marlowe  was one of the most successful dramatizations, and after it had run its course as a drama, it saw service as an opera.  Mr. Major wrote many other books and established himself in the regard of a large public.  His live was singularly successful and happy one.  He was handsomely rewarded for his literary labors, he enjoyed a wide acquaintance both among literary people and artists in other fields and he occupied himself with work and study in quite an ideal fashion.  He was an agreeable gentleman, always cordial and friendly, whose personal qualities as well as his literary achievements did much to publish the good name of Indiana abroad."
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind., November 3, 1911
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         Dr.  W. N.  Wishard  of Indianapolis was in the city today to see Mrs.  W. S.  Major.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, August 24, 1911.
Page 4   Column 3
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MANY  REMEMBERED
ON  THEIR  BIRTHDAYS
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Big Dinners and Family Reunions
Make List of Enjoyable Social Events.
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THREE  BIRTHDAY  PARTIES
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(From Monday's Daily.)
          Several of the members of the  Major  family held a reunion at the home of  Mr. and Mrs. Thad Major,  at Irvington, Sunday.  An elegant dinner was enjoyed at the noon hour by the guests, who included  Mr. and Mrs. William A. Major  and daughter,  Miss Ethel,  Mr. and Mrs. Harry Major  and son,  Robert Allen,  Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Major,  of this city;  Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Major  and daughter  Miss Helen  of Rush county;  Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Dyer,  of Pittsboro, and  Dr. and Mrs. Meier,  of Irvington.
Note:  The article continues with Fred Meloy's birthday party.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming

The  Daily  Democrat
Saturday, July 1, 1911
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          Harry Major  went to Anderson last night to remain till after the Fourth as the guest of relatives of his wife.  Mrs. Major  and son, Robert Allen, have been there for several days.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The Indianapolis Star
January 11, 1911
Page 3, Column 1
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[as part of a much longer article]
          Officers of the Indiana State Federation of Clubs will preside at the sessions of this congress, although the meeting is not confined to members of the affiliated organizations.  ...Officers of the Indiana State Federation are:...  Mrs. W. S. Major  of Shelbyville, grand federation secretary.
Contributed anonymously


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, October, 22, 1909.
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          Charles Majors'  new book,  "A Tenth Knight of Old Brandenburg,"  at  Dunn & Sayler's.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Saturday, October 5, 1907
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PERSONALS.
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          Mr. and Mrs. Isaac East, of Anderson, who have been visiting  Mr. and Mrs. Harry Major, of this city, returned home today.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
April 4, 1907
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          Thad L. Major,  formerly of this county, but now residing in Irvington, was a welcome caller on the  Democrat  today.  The many friends of Mr. Major will be glad to know that he is making good in the life insurance business.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Tuesday, February 20, 1906
Page 1
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GOLD  MEDAL  GIVEN  SHELBYVILLE  WOMAN
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Mrs. W. S. Major  Awarded  Medal  for  Services  as  Judge
at  St. Louis  Exposition -- Diploma  Accompanies  Medal.
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            [My microfilm copy did not include the article, just the title. - pmf]
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming



The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, September 20, 1905
Page 1
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          Invitations are out announcing the wedding of  Mr. Harry Moberly  of Union township, and  Miss Mildred Major  of Shelby township.  The wedding will occur at the home of the bride's parents,  Mr. and Mrs. William A. Major, on Thursday evening, October the fifth, at eight o'clock.  After the wedding the bride and groom will go to Ohio on a short trip.
          The young couple will reside on a farm in Washington township and will carry to their new home the best wishes of a large circle of friends for a long and happy married life.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
July 27, 1905
Page 8
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          Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Morrison,  Wm. Major,  Dr. George Fleming,  Mrs. C. J. DeHeur,  Mrs. T. J. Kennedy  and the  Misses Leifers,  will hear Creator at Fair bank on Wednesday evening.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
April 19, 1900
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         Charles Major has purchased the old  Michael Billman homestead of 140 acres in Marion township, paying $9,800 therefor.  Mr. Major now owns 360 acres of land in one body.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, September 22, 1899
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          Found, by  Wm. A. Major  near the Green school house, in Shelby township, one pair of gold rimmed spectacles.  Call at his residence and receive same.
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          Lost, pocket book containing $2.40, having the name of  Wallace Major  on inside, somewhere between the residence of  Wm. A. Major  in Shelby township and this city.  Finder will be rewarded for returning same to this office or to  Wm. A. Major.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, July 29, 1899
Page 4
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         Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Major, accompanied by Miss Lucy Blanchard, have gone to Lake Chatauqua.
Copied Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, July 18, 1899
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          The success of "When Knighthood Was in Flower," continues unabated and it now ranks as one of the best selling books in every   [the article continues-pmf]
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday April 16, 1891
page 3 column 1
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          Married, at the Presbyterian parsonage in Black Hawk, Colorado, April 1st, 1891, Mr. James R. Sams  and  Miss Grace Major, daughter of the late  Allen Major, of this county, the Rev. W. M. Porter officiating.  Both of Central City, Colorado.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyvillenbsp; Daily  Democrat
Monday, May 6, 1889
Page 1
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ADDITIONAL  LOCAL.
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          Col. Ed. Major  is back among his friends.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Republican
Friday Evening, July 6, 1888
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          Mrs. W. S. Major  is sick at her home on West Braodway street.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Monday, January 25, 1886
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L O C A L     N E W S.
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          Mrs. W. S. Major  is visiting friends in Louisville, Ky.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Saturday, January 31, 1885
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L O  C  A  L      N  E  W  S.
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          Mr. Alfred Major, Sr.,  has presented  Charles Fastlaben  with a handsome $35 clock.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Thursday, July 13, 1882
Page 3, column 1
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         The remains of  Mrs. Stephen Major were taken to Indianapolis Monday morning, and was interred by the side of her husband at Crown Hill.
Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Thursday, April 13, 1882
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LOCAL  NEWS
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          The property now occupied by  Capt. R. S. Collum  on West Broadway, will be for rent after 1st.  Apply to  Charles Major.
Contributed by D. Darlene Palmer


The  Shelbyville  Volunteer
Thursday, January 3, 1878
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         Mr. and Mrs. William Major celebrated their "wooden wedding" Monday night, at their residence in this city, a large number of invited guests being present to enjoy the happy occasion.  The host and hostess were the recipients of quite an array of beautiful and appropriate presents, worth in the aggregate about three hundred dollars.  We wish this couple a frequent recurrence of their wedding anniversary, until they arrive, after a happy and prosperous life, at the period for celebrating a "golden" and even a "diamond" wedding.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming

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