The  Shelbyville  Republican
July 16, 1929
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TWO  CHARGED  WITH  LARCENY
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WILLIAM  TADLOCK  AND  FRANK  McCOLLEY,
OF  MARION  TOWNSHIP
AWAIT  ARRAIGNMENT  FOR  THEFT
OF  FIVE  CHICKENS
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Birds  Taken  From  Farm  of  Clyde Wicker
Found  in  McColley's  Auto  by  Sheriff
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          William Tadlock  and  Frank McColley,  Marion township residents, are in arraignment on a charge of petit larceny, which was filed against them yesterday afternoon after an investigation as to the legality of their possession of five chickens, found in a sack in McColley's automobile Sunday by  Sheriff George Nigh.  The sheriff found Tadlock sitting in McColley's car, parked on the Riley highway, a short distance northeast of Shelbyville.  When asked for an explanation, Tadlock told the sheriff that McColley, to whom the machine belonged, had gone to get some gasoline for the car.  Sheriff Nigh then noticed the sack in the rear seat of the machine and found that it contained five chickens.  The investigation yesterday revealed that the chickens were taken from the farm of  Clyde Wicker, northeast of this city, and were the property of  Mrs. Wicker.  Tadlock and McColley had gone to Wicker's farm earlier in the day to get the automobile license plates off a machine which Tadlock had given Wicker in trade for some hogs.  While McColley was removing the license plates, Tadlock caught the chickens and placed them in the sack.  He told the local authorities that the chickens were part of the exchange deal, but this Mr. and Mrs. Wicker denied.  The automobile trade had been made some time ago, but Tadlock had delayed in getting the license plates.  When first questioned about the chickens by Sheriff Nigh, Tadlock was said to have stated that they were taken from his own farm and that he was giving them to McColley.  The chickens were in the sack were white and an extensive search on Tadlock's property, failed to reveal any other white chickens, contrary to claims by Tadlock.  He and McColley therefore were taken into custody for further questioning.  Two of the chickens were dead when the sack was opened by the sheriff.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Shelby  News
1929
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Men  Charged  In  Chicken  Thefts
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Petit  Larceny  Charges  Filed  Against
William  Tadlock  and  Frank  McColley
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STOLEN  AT  WICKER  FARM
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Chickens  found  in  Auto  Said  to  Have
Been  Owned  by  Clyde  Wicker----
Tadlock  Reported  To  Have  Confessed  to  Theft.
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          Affidavits charging  William Tadlock  and  Frank McColley with petit larceny have been filed by  Sumner Terry, Shelby County prosecutor, as the result of an investigation conducted by authorities into the ownership of five chickens found Saturday night by  Sheriff George Nigh  when he arrested Tadlock for intoxication after finding him asleep in McColley's automobile near this city on the Riley highway north.  According to authorities, Tadlock has admitted that the chickens were taken from the farm of  Clyde Wicker, northeast of Marion, during Mr. Wicker's absence. Both McColley and Tadlock were held in the county jail after their arrests Saturday pending the outcome of the investigation regarding the ownership of the chickens which the sheriff found in a sack in the rear compartment of McColley's automobile.  When arrested and asked about the chickens, Tadlock told the Sheriff that they had been taken from his flock at his home in Marion and that he had given them to McColley.  The latter however, denied that this was true and the investigation resulted.  Information reaching the sheriff's office indicated that several persons residing in the vicinity of the Wicker home saw Tadlock and McColley taking the chickens.  When confronted with this information. Tadlock is said to have told that he recently traded an automobile to Mr. Wicker for some hogs and that McColley and Tadlock went to the Wicker home to obtain Tadlock's license plates which had not yet been taken from the auto.  Tadlock told the deputy sheriff that while McColley was removing the plates from the automobile, Tadlock caught the chickens and placed them in a sack.  McColley is said to deny any connection with the alleged theft but an affidavit, was filed charging the men jointly with petit larceny.  According to law enforcement officials, McColley is now at liberty on bond furnished in similar charges when he was arrested for the theft of chickens.  It is the contention of authorities that Tadlock is attempting to assume the blame for the theft at the Wicker farm.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
June 14, 1929
Page 5   Column 3
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CHARGED  WITH  CHICKEN  THEFT
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Three Stolen Hens Found in Outbuilding Today
at Home of Sanford McCauley
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WIFE IS ALSO CHARGED
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Trail of Feathers Leads From Home of Owner
to Yard at Home of Defendant----
Denies Theft in Police Statement
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           Theft of three hens from the chicken house at the home of  Willard Huffman  on Main street, Thursday night, resulted in the arrest of  Sanford McCauley [McColley]  and his wife  May McCauley  today on charges of petit larceny and receiving stolen goods.
          McCauley was in custody this afternoon, unable to provide a bond of $500 in the Shelby circuit court, where the charge was filed.  Mrs. McCauley was not taken in charge and no bond was fixed for her retention on the charge.  Mr. McCauley was taken in charge at his home where police officers found the three chickens in the vault of an outbuilding.
          Police officers  Charles Goebel  and  William Fiscus  investigated the report from Mr. Huffman that three of his prize chickens had been stolen during the night.  They traced white feathers of the chickens from the home of Mr. Huffman to Glenn avenue, back of the fairgrounds.  From there the trail of feathers led to an alley back of the home at the McCauley place.
          Mrs. McCauley was questioned by the officers but she denied any knowledge of the stolen chickens and left the officers to go to the outbuilding.  McCauley appeared and he also denied knowing anything of the chickens.  When Mrs. McCauley left the building, the officers entered and found a pile of feathers on the floor.  Continuing their search they saw the three dead chickens in the vault and recovered the poultry. McCauley was placed under arrest and taken to the police station where he was questioned.
          At police headquarters, McCauley declared he did not know how the chickens came to be in the building at his home.  Several of his sons were also questioned by the officers pertaining to the where-abouts of their father last night.  After the questioning, McCauley was slated in the Shelby circuit court on the affidavit filed against him and his wife.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday, July 27, 1916
Twenty-Ninth Year  No. 70
Page 1
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          A bouncing baby boy of eleven-pound avoirdupois was born in  Mr. and Mrs. Dan McColley, of near Manilla, Thursday morning.  It came by the Dr. Inlow stork route.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
June 30, 1904
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          ... commencement exercises of Liberty Twp., held in the Baptist Church of Waldron, Saturday evening.  Cora F. McColley won 1st Honors.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
April 21, 1892
Page 3  column 1
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          Albert Avy,  living with  George McColley, found a large tooth in Conn's creek, about two and a half miles south of Waldron, which measures eight inches by [?], a bicuspid eight inches in depth and weight [?] pounds.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming

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