Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Miller


The  Kokomo  Tribune
August 1, 1931
Page 6
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          Mr. and Mrs. Fred Miller  and daughter,  Mary Jane, went to Noblesville Saturday to be the guests of  Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Johns.  Mr. and Mrs. Johns and their guests will attend the Miller reunion at Shelbyville Sunday.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Kokomo  Tribune
April 8, 1931
Page 10
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BELIEVE  GANG  DISCOVERED
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Shelbyville, Ind., April 7
          With the arrest here of  John Doyle Shrout, alias Harry Miller, and  Fannie Conway, police said tonight they believed a band of criminals operating in Indiana and Illinois had been discovered.  The two confessed forging checks here, officers said.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Kokomo  Tribune
February 16, 1931
Page 1
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          Mrs. Opal Stainbrook,  28, a bride of less than two months, was fatally hurt Saturday night when an automobile driven by her husband  Clarence Stainbrook,  collided nine miles north of Shelbyville with a machine driven by  Garnet Miller  of Fairland.  Stainbrook was hurt, as were  Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Stainbrook  riding with them.  The party was returning from a basketball game at Indianapolis.  John Jones  of Fairland, riding with Miller also was injured.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


A  Shelby  County  Newspaper
Unknown date, probably the 1920's
----------
JAP  MILLER
--------
Jap Miller down at Martinsville's the blamdest feller yet!
When he starts in a-talkin' other folds is apt to quit! --
'Pears like that mouth o' his'n wuzn't made fer nothin' else
But jes' to argify 'em down and gether in their pelts;
He'll talk you down on tariff; er he'll talk you down on tax,
And prove the pore man pays 'em all -- and them's about the fac's! --
Religen, law, er politics, prize fightin', er baseball --
Jes tech Jap up a little and he'll post you 'bout 'em all.

And the comicalist feller ever tilted  back a cheer
And tuck a chaw tobacker kind o' like he didn't keer --
There's where the feller's stren'th lays -- he's so common-like and plain, --
They haint no dude about old Jap, you bet -- nary grai!
They 'lected him to Council and it never turned his head,
And didn't make no difference what any body siad,--
He didn't dress no finer, ner rag out in fancy clothes;
But his voice in Council-meetin's is turrer to his foes.

He's fer the pore man ever' time!  And in the last campaign
He stumped old Morgan County through the sunshine and the rain,
And held the banner up'ards from a-trailin' in the dust,
And cut loose on monopolies and cuss'd and cuss'd and cuss'd!
He'd tell some funny story ever' now and then, you know,
Tel, blame it!  it wuz better'n a jack-o'-lantern show!
And I'd go furder, yit, today, to hear old Jap norate
Than any high-toned orator 'at ever stumped the State!

W'y, that-air blame Jap Miller, with his keen sircastic fun,
Has got more friends than ary candidate 'at every run!
Don't matter what his views is, when he states the same to you,
They allus coincide with your'n, the same as two and two;
You can't  take issue with him -- er at least, they haint no sense
In startin' in to down him, so you better not commence, --
The best way's jes' to listen, like your humble servant does,
And jes' concede Jap Miller is the best man ever wuz!
James Whitcomb Riley.
          Jap Miller, "the blamdest feller yit," mayor of Brookly 32 years, and immortalized by his firend James Whitcomb Riley in poetry, was a week-end visitor in Morristown, the guest of his neice, Miss Laura Blanche Miller.
          Jap appropriated the mayor's office as a Democrat so many years ago that the Republican shave never had a chance to make a change.  Even when Jap lived in Morristown from 1921 to 1926, he brought the Brooklyn mayorlty[sic] office with him and never surrendered any of its perogatives.  Just as soon as he returned to Brooklyn, he took over the same old office and has continued on the job ever since.
          "The doctors have had me buried twice in three years," said Jap to one of his old friends he met in the post office.  "I've fooled them and will keep on doing so.  I'm about the liveliest corpse in Morgan county and still get a lot of fun out of life."
          Jap Miller just the kind of a politician Riley described and as a vote getter will never have an equal in Morgan county.  Once Jap ran on a "keep the cow out" ticket in Brooklyn.  His supporters were the owners of bovines that brazed up and down the roadside and on streets of the town for their mild supply.  Before election some of Japs' supporters changed their minds and suggested that the cows be "kept in."  The candidate was unrelenting.  "Nope,"  he said,  "I'm going to be elected on a 'keep the cows out' platform and that's the way it's going to be.  So Jap was elected and the cows remained out.
          While Riley described Jap Miller as "no dude" he wears good clothes and looks more yothful than many a man of his years.  It hasn't been so long ago when he passed his 75th milestone.  Despite several serious illnesses, he looks well [three to five words missing]  that same old cordiality with which he has always greeted the electorate in good old Morgan county.
          Morgan county still remains somewhat of a mystery to Jap Miller, though he has lived there many years.  "I have been through three bank failures,"  said Jap, discussing Morgan county's apparent ability to hang on in spite of the hills.  "If I had had just a few more dollars, I could have been in the fourth one.  The last bank I helped to finance cost me $600.  I counldn't[sic] see how they could start another bank when they solicited me.  Some of the homes look rather humble setting back in valleys and on the hillsides.  You wouldn't suspect that the owners had much money.
          "But it would surprise you to know what they done in financing that bank.  One fellow, a typical native, said he'd put in some cash.  I couldn't figure out that he could do any better than myself.  Much to my surprise this fellow raised $6,000.  The sum total raised was $20,000 and it didn't take the boys long to get that amount.
          "Nobody is starving in Morgan county,"  continued Jap,  "but business has been cut to about one-half of the old volume.  I guess the welfare committees will have to do all of their work in the cities.  There was never such an abundance of good things to eat as you'll find in Morgan county.  There has been a wonderful horticultual development in the county.  For files about you'll find the greatest apple orchards in America, and the trees were loaded down this summer with quality. fruit. We sold a lot of the best apples ever gown at 25 to 50 cents a bushel.  Many of the trees werre planted only 30 years ago.  The Hubbards and the Johnsons are great apple growers, one of these firms having 300 acres in a single orchard."
          "Morgan county is filled with good people.  That's why it is such a fine place in which to live and have neighbors.  Morristown has a warm spot in my heart and there are plenty of good people here, too."
          Jap Mliler[sic] carries his own introduction and it reads thusly:
          "Was born in Shelby county, Indiana, early in the 19th century, on a farm.  A fine home.  Splendid Christian parents.  The only boy that has made good under such surroundings.  On account of law enforcement in early life, I moved to Morgan county.  I have lived there ever since except for the few years spent in Morristown and Marion county, the latter on a farm.  Back to the soil, it was.  I got enough of it to last me several llifetimes,  I am a firm believer in Democracy but have no desire to get on the firing line.  Just a business man who warks at his trade at the greatest store in Morgan county.  Dealer in everything under the sun.  Come and see the place -- they all know."
Contributed by Anita Lumsden.


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Shelbyville, Indiana
Wednesday, September 12, 1923
Page 4
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REAL 'OLD TIMER' RETURNS HOME
-------
          Shelby county has a visitor this week in Alfred N. Miller, who can properly be called "an old timer".  Mr. Miller was born in the Marietta neighborhood eighty-three years ago.  When he was nineteen years old he enlisted in the Civil War and fought through that conflict with distinguished honor.  When Kansas was opened under the homestead laws to the soldiers Mr. Miller "went west," and like the majority of them he entered 160 acres of land.  Gradually he drifted west until now he is a citizen of Hagerman, New Mexico.  He is a Grand Army man of prominence and excellence.  Last week he attended the national encampment of the patriotic organization in Milwaukee.  He was the only representative of New Mexico at the encampment.  To a friend in this city, last evening, Mr. Miller remarked:  "If there had been no more from other sections than were there from New Mexico the attendance would not have been very large."  When the parade was formed Mr. Miller was in line and marched the length of the route.  At these annual encampments the plan now is to provide machines for the "vets" in order that they can go the route, see and be seen, but Mr. Miller said he preferred to walk; that he could get more out of it.  Mr. Miller is truly hale and hearty.  For a day or two he will visit among his few remaining relatives who reside about Smithland and Marietta.  He belongs to the family of Millers that had much to do with the early settling of that section of Shelby county.  In 1840 when Mr. Miller was born the town of Marietta had been platted one year and consisted of a half-dozen log cabins.  He was eleven years old when the town of Smithland was platted.  He was six years old when the work of building the Edinburg and Shelbyville railroad was started and he was nine years old when the road was completed and it was his pleasure to see the first train go over the road.  He was nine years old when the construction of the Lawrenceburg railroad to Indianapolis was started and he was thirteen years old when that road was placed in operation.  Marietta and Smithland were stations on the Edinburg and Shelbyville road.  The fact that Mr. Miller has been away from Shelby county for more than fifty years causes the improvements that have taken place to appear even greater than they are.  Mr. Miller still has a very warm place in his heart for Shelby county.  He was here a year ago and had made a number of visits back to his "old home town" since he first went away.  There is a tinge of sadness in his return to Hendricks township, as there are very few of his boyhood friends now living and there is not a man in Hendricks township who enlisted from that township in the Civil war now living.  In Shelbyville he has a number of friends among them being  Dr. S. P. McCrea, who, during his early days, romped through the woods that covered the "big hill," west of Smithland.  Mr. Miller will visit in and about Shelbyville for several days.
Contributed by Marge Roberts


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday August 2, 1923
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DIVORCE  GRANTED
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          Mrs. Blanche Miller, of this city, was granted a divorce in the Shelby circuit court today from  James Miller.  The custody of their two children was granted to  Mrs. Sarah E. Miller, mother of the defendant.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Tuesday July 27, 1920
Page 1 column 5
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PAID  FINES
-----------------
Fight During Morning Led To Arrest Of Two
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          Phillip Miller and Ralph Jacobs, brother-in-law, of this city, who were formerly partners in the operation of the business of the  Miller Overall Company,  were arrested this morning, following a fight, which the two had at the office of the Miller plant.
          Jacobs was fined $5 and costs on a charge of provoke, and Miller paid a similar fine and costs on a charge of assault and battery.  A charge of assault against  Isadore Miller was dismissed in the city court, where the men were arraigned.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Indianapolis Star
November 7, 1915
Page 69   Column 7
----------
SHELBYVILLE.
--------
          Mrs. Helen Miller  is in Indianapolis Visiting her brother,  Bert Bishop,  and  Mrs. Bishop.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
April 9, 1915
Page 5   Columns 4-5
--------
          John Miller,  75 years old, broke his left hip in a fall while walking in the yard at this home in Morristown.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Monday, December 15, 1913
Page 1
-----o-oOo-o-----
          Mrs. Jesse Miller, who had been in a hospital at Indianapolis for the past few weeks, was brought here late this afternoon and was taken in the Hageman & Hendrickson ambulance, this evening, to her home near Smithland.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Shelbyville, Ind.
Thursday, November 9, 1911
-------------
        HABEAS CORPUT WRIT
ISSUED THIS MORNING
----
SHERIFF  MUST  SHOW  BY  WHAT
RIGHT  HE  HOLDS
MRS. CHARITY  MILLER.
----
MITTIMUS  ALLEGED  FAULTY
----
Was Issued by Squire Henry Cole, 
of Morristown,  After Woman 
Had Been Arraigned by Her Husband
in Peace Proceedings.
----------
          Trouble is promising to pile up for some one in connection with the sensational arrest of Mrs.  Charity  Miller,  aged fifty years, last Monday evening at her home in Fountaintown, and it appears that the major portion of the load of blame will fall on the shoulders of  Henry  B.  Cole,  of Morristown, a justice of the peace, from whose court the warrant was issued for the arrest of the woman, and on whose orders Mrs. Miller is now being deprived of her liberty by incarceration in the county jail in this city.  She has been confined in the jail on Justice Cole's orders since the midnight hour Monday night.
          Today she secured the services of the legal firm of  Meiks and Hack  to fight her battle in court, by means of which she expects presently to secure her freedom.  Acting for Mrs. Miller the legal firm this morning filed for her a petition for a writ of habeas corpus before Judge Blair in circuit court, the action being directed against  James  M.  Moore,  as sheriff of Shelby county, and the court immediately ordered the writ issued and served on the sheriff commanding him to have Mrs. Miller before the court tomorrow to the end that it may be determined whether the sheriff has the right to hold her a prisoner.
          The petition for the writ charges that Mrs. Miller is illegally held and confined and deprived of her liberty on an illegal and void mittimus issued by Justice Cole.  It appears that Mrs. Miller will easily win out in her contention as the mittimus on which she was given into the custody of the sheriff reads in substance that she is to be held in jail for a period of two hundred days on account of having been fined $200 in a surety of the peace proceedings brought against her by her husband,  Albert Miller.  If Justice Cole really means what he says in the mittimus he has far exceeded his authority as a justice of the peace as he could not legally fine any man or woman to exceed $25 on any charge that might be preferred in his court.
          In surety of the peace proceedings it is customary for the justice either to discharge the accused or to post him under bond to hold him till the matter can be finally heard in a higher court for the purpose of seeing whether the bond should be made permanent or the accused released.
          It is highly probably that Mr. Cole meant to follow this line of prodecure and that the $200 mentioned is intended as the amount of the bond the woman should given in order to await a hearing, but the mittimus refers to the amount as a fine and not as a bond. At the time Mrs. Miller was sent to the jail here it was announced that she had been unable to give the bond required in the case.
          She was arrested because she had threatened to kill her husband, her children and some of her husband's relatives. It is said that in the final airing of the trouble that it will be shown that Mrs. Miller was very roughly handled by her relatives and by Constable  John  Flint,  who was sent out from Morristown to make the arrest. It was reported at the time of the arrest that the woman was carried coatless and shoeless from her home to the traction station.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming, Sep 2000


The  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, August 24, 1911
Page 4   column 5
----------
NEWS   NOTES
----------
          O. R. Miller,  of Flat Rock, represents  Ralph J. Edwards, undertaker.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday April 21, 1911
Page 1 column 1
----------
HUBBY’S  MONEY  ALL  SHE  WANTED
-----------
Albert C. Miller, According To His Divorce Complaint
Was Badly Henpecked By His Wife
-----------
CONTINUALLY  NAGGED  HUSBAND
-----------
Took His Money Away From Him and
Finally Caused His Arrest For Assault and Battery
----------
Jail Sentence
----------
          Continual nagging, petty annoyance and keeping her husband "broke and badly bent" most of the time are some of the allegations in a divorce complaint filed by Albert C. Miller against his wife, Charity Miller.
The plaintiff is a resident of Shelby county and has been for two years. They were married December 21, 1910, and separated April 10, 1911.  Miller charges his wife with being cruel and inhuman in her treatment toward him, that she cursed and abused him in a shameful manner, that she would not permit his children by a former marriage to return to their home, that she did not love him and often said that she married him for what money she could get out of him. 
Mr. Miller further states that she would take his money away from him without his consent and that defendant at one time caused plaintiff to be sentenced to the workhouse in Indianapolis for thirty days for assault and battery on her, that before he was taken to jail she took all his money away from him.  It was six days later before he could get friends in Shelby county to cause his release.  He fears that his life will be in danger if he longer remains the husband of Mrs. Miller and he is seeking an absolute divorce.
----------
Marion County, Indiana Marriages
Albert C. Miller   &  Charity Vansickle
December 21, 1909
Book 55    page 205
----------
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Tuesday, March 7, 1911
Page 3
------------
         O. R. Miller  represents Undertaker  Ralph Edwards at Flat Rock.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday, March 6, 1911
Page 1
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MARRIED  SATURDAY  NIGHT
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Young People Start a Second Trip
O'er Matrimonial Sea.
----------
         Mr. Harry Cook, son of  Mr. and Mrs. George Cook, of Marion township, and  Miss Cletoa Miller, daughter of  Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Miller, of this city, were united in marriage Saturday night.  The bride secured a divorce from Mr. Cook about a year ago, after they had resided together a few months.  Both are well known young people and their large number of friends wish them much happiness during their their second voyage over the matrimonial sea.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Friday, March 4, 1910
Page 1   column 6
----------
NEWS   NOTES
----------
          Ira Miller,  of Brandywine township, was in the city on business today.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Friday, September 13, 1907
Page 4
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FUSSED  PVER  $2
LEFFERSON  ARRESTED
----------
He Claimed That Enos Miller
Owed Him That Amount For
Rent -- Miller Says Leffer-
son Borrowed From Him.
----------
(From Wednesday's Daily.)
          Arthur T. Lefferson  and  Enos Miller  has a misunderstanding Monday, and, as a result, Lefferson has been arrested on the charge of provoke.
          Lefferson, who is a farmer, formerly owned a feed store in this city.  Miller funs a coal yard in the southeastern part of the city.  According to the story they met in front of the Range factory Monday.  Lefferson claimed that Miller owed him $2 for rent.  Miller claimed that Lefferson borrowed some money from him and that it was enought to settle the rent.  Words passed between them and Miller filed an affidavit against Lefferson for provoke.  He was brought before  Squire Jesse Walker  where he was put under bond for his appearance Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, December 26, 1905
-------
          Leo Miller  and  Misses Blanche Scales  and  Ethel Moore  of Marion, who have been the guests of  Miss Helen Voll, have returned to their homes.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, September 20, 1905
Page 1
--------------
          Morris Miller, operator in the Western Union Telegraph office has returned from Bloomington, where he spent several days visiting his mother -- and his "best".
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, February 28, 1901
---------------------
          The marriage of  William Cooper, the well-known grass0widower and  Miss Lillie Miller  who has been living with  Mrs. Daniel Apple  of West Hendricks-st., this city, will occur this evening.
Contributed by Phyllis MIller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Friday, July 29, 1898
===============
         Jesse W. Rinehart  and  Dora A. Turner, of Boone county, were married Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. at the house of  John Miller, on East Polk street, by  Pastor Groom.  the wedding was very quiet and pretty.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming

The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday January 13, 1898
Page 3 column 1
--------
           Benedict Miller was Thursday granted a divorce from  Jennie Miller, alleging adultery.  Mrs. Miller is now residing in Elwood, and Miller is a farm hand in this county.  Attorney John A. Tindall represented the plaintiff.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Shelbyville, Ind., September 18, 1896
Page 2
==================================
HORD.
--------
          N. A. Miller and family spent Sunday with Mason Robison.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming, Jun 2000.


The  Shelby  Democrat
July 18, 1895
-------o-------
          Yell [?] sweeps are now a thing of the past in Shelby county, the Board of Commissioners having wiped the last one out Saturday by the purchase of the Shelbyville Chapel and County Lane road, east of the city.  The road is five miles in length and the price paid was $800.  The road was owned by Washington Chapman,  Frederick Miller,  the Miller estate  and  Benjamin Powell.  The transfer was made on Monday.  There are 140 miles of turnpike in the county.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, May 29, 1894
----------
          Jap Miller, the recent nominee for the joint senatorship of Johnson and Mogan counties, is on eof the happiest individuals in the state.  He's as good as elected in his own mind.  Of him the Martinsville Reporter says:  "Jap Miller is thirty seven years old and was born in Shelby county.  He has always lived in Shelby and Morgan counties.  He has always been of a social turn and can get acquainted with a stranger quicker than a tramp dog can rob a hen's nest.  He has an off-hand sort of way of conducting himself that draws many to him.  He was made celebrated by  James Whitcomb Riley's poem, 'Jap Miller,'  in which Riley portrays the man as everybody finds him.  Jap can talk on any subject, but confides his talk to those subjects about which he knows the least.  He is original in his way.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Thursday, February 23, 1893
========================
ANOTHER SHOOTING
------------
Of Course He Didn't Know it Was Loaded.
----------
Was it an Accidental Shooting or Was it Deliberate Murder?
----------
          Shelbyville has a large number of people who are not first-class law-abiding citizens.  With the laxness of law and everything running loose the only wonder is that we do not have more killing scraps than we have.
          Sunday afternoon Scott Miller  and  Robert Porterfield, a couple of youths about nineteen years of age, went into an old house on Vine, between that and the river near the bridge over Little Blue River.  They went into the loft for the purpose of card playing.  Each had a gun.  According to the story they took the cylinders out of their revolvers and began a game of cards. As they played they would take up their chamberless revolvers and snap them at each other.  This it is supposed they did in order to add excitement to the game and to make it appear more like real warfare gambling.  But the play went too long, for finally Miller pointed his gun at Porterfield, when there was a loud report and Miller rushed down and out into the street where he was stopped by some one who had heard the shot and to them he gave the version of the affair as above.  He was taken before Esquire Louden where he gave substantially the same report of the affair, saying that Porterfield had slipped the cylindar back into the gun without his knowledge and insisting that it was purely accidental.  The bullet entered Porterfield's face just below the right eye and passed out just above the right ear, his face being powder burnt from the close proximity of the muzzle of the pistol when the shot when the shot was fired.  Porterfield was taken to his home, corner Walker and Hamilton streets, where he died in a short time.  While Miller asserts that it was purely accidental, there were those who sake [sic] their heads when they heard of it.  The first report was that there was no one present, but later  John B. Miller  says he was present when the shooting occurred and corroborates the above, but he has told two stories about this.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
July 17, 1890
Page 3
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          In the suit of  Missouri Miller  vs.  Bennett Powell,  et al, on note, a judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $102.98 has been given.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 27, 1886
----------
L O C A L    N E W S.
-----------
          Miss Josie Miller  is very sick at her home on East Franklin street.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 27, 1886
----------
L O C A L    N E W S.
-----------
          Miss Maggie Lamar, of Marietta, is visiting friends here.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, January 26, 1886
----------
LOCAL  NEWS.
----------
          Rev. John Miller,  (colored) of Edinburg, is having revival services every evening at the Second Baptist Church on Hendricks street.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
March 12, 1885
------------
          Henry Miller, who was sent to the insane hospital from this township last June, returned home last Wednesday.  Henry is an object of pity; his mind, always weak, is now entirely gone, and his conversation is as simple and meaningless as the prattle of a babe.  He is perfectly harmless, but the asylum is the best place for him.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Union  Banner
May 12, 1864
Page 2, col 4
----------
THE STATE OF INDIANA }Ss.
Shelby County,                      }
In the Common Pleas Court, July Term, 1864.
      Alexander C. Miller, }
                 vs               } Compl't for Divorce.
         Lavinia Miller     }

Be it remembered, that on this 11th day of May 1864, the plaintiff in the above named cause, by Davis, Wright & Green, his attorneys, filed in the Clerk's office of said Court his complaint herein, together with the affidavit of a competent and disinterested person, addedging that the defendant, Lavinia Miller is a non-resident of the State of Indiana.  Said defendant is therefore hereby notified of the filing of said complaint, and the pendency of said action, and that she be an appear in said Court on the first day of the next term thereof, to be holden at the Court House, in the city of Shelbyville, in said county, on the first Monday in July next, to answer said complaint; or in default, the same will be heard and acted upon in her absence.
Witness Alonzo Blair, Clerk of said Court, May 11, 1864. ALONZO BLAIR, Cl'k.          
Davis, Wright & Green, Attorneys for the plaintiff.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming, Apr 2000.


The  Shelby  Union  Banner
February 18, 1864
Page 3 col 1
-------oOo-------
          BOLD ROBBERIES. -- On last Saturday evening, between the hours of 7 and 8 o'clock, Mr. Vincent Taylor and his wife, an aged couple living about two miles southeast of the city, were visited by four men, their faces being concealed by handkerchiefs, who upon....  Taylor being powerless was forced to hand over all his money amounting to $230.00.
          On Sunday evening the same party visited the residences of James Tucker and Isaac Miller, about seven miles south-west of the city, and the same proceedings being gone through with, they received from Mr. Tucker $393, partly in gold, and from Mr. Miller something over $200.  Entrance was gained into all these houses by the men announcing themselves as certain young men of the neighborhood, who being well know were admitted, and the inmates in all cases being old and inform, were incapable of resisting.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming, Jan 2000.

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