Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Talbert


The  Shelby  Democrat
Saturday, July 21, 1956
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MISS  YARBER  BECOMES  BRIDE
OF  DONALD  TALBERT  IN  CHURCH  RITE
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St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 10:00 o'clock, Miss Marilyn Dawn Yarber  became the bride of  Donald W. Talbert.  The bride is d/o  Mr. and Mrs. Edward Clements of 460 W. Mechanic St., groom's parents are  Mr. and Mrs. Aris Talbert  of 318 Wellington Blvd.
Boquets[sic] of pink and white carnations and palms; vows were read by  Rev. James Barton.
Bride was given by her step-father.  Floor length gown of nylon tulle, imported Chantilly lace, pleated tulle insert underskirting.  The scalloped neckline, long sleeved bodice, accented with seed pearls and irridescent sequins.  Carried a boquet of red roses and white stephanotis.
Miss Mary Louise Rahe  was maid of honor, floor-length lavender taffeta gown and net, stole of tafetta and the full skirt, tiny tafetta bows.
Bridesmaids:  Shirli Cole,  Barbara Borel,  and Marilyn Brooks.  Gowns as above, in blue, pink and green, respectively.  Carried white carnations, tinted carnations matching gowns.
Jack Disser  was the best man and groomsmen were  Bill Huffman,  Dave Klare  and  Richard Yarber.  Ushers were  Tom Taylor  and  Bill Montanye.
Miss Anne Breck  sang.  Organ music, Miss Willa Jo Barricklow  during the ceremony.
Reception St. Vincent's church.
Mrs. Clements wore a navy blue dress with white accessories.  Groom's mother wore navy.  Both corsages were red roses with white ribbons.
Bride had yellow nylon dress with black accessories for a wedding trip (through northern Michigan).  They will live in their new home at 851 W. Franklin St.
Mr. and Mrs. Talbert graduated of Shelbyville HS.  He is employed at General Electric plant.
Submitted by T Nugent
Summarized by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
August 3, 1936
Page 3   column 2
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S O C I E T Y   N E W S
Frances Phares, Society Editor
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FIFTY  ATTEND
TALBERT  REUNION.
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          Fifty persons attended the nineteenth  Talbert  reunion held Sunday at the Laura Morrison park, in Shelbyville.
          The business was settled in the morning, during which time new officers were elected.  Mrs. Joe Carter,  of near Morristown, is the president for the coming year.  A. V. Talbert,  also of near Morristown, will act as vice-president.  Mrs. Blanch Talbert,  of Shelbyville, is the new secretary-tresurer.
          At noon a basket lunch was served.  A program including violin and guitar music presented by  Raymond Yarling  and  George Kuhn,  was presented in the afternoon.
          The next meeging will be the first Sunday in August, 1937, at the same place.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Kokomo  Tribune
Oct 14, 1933
Page 2
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Death Message Received
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          Mrs. William Talbert  has received word from  Mrs. Joseph Dow  of Shelbyville, formerly of Kokomo, that the latter's mother,  Mrs. Thomas Ewick  died Friday at Shelbyville.  No details were given in the message.  When the Dow family lived in Kokomo, Mrs. Ewick visited them several times and made a number of friends here.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Indianapolis  Star
October 9, 1923
Page 4
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          Morristown--- Announcement has been made of the marriage of  Miss Clara Belle VanWre  of Kansas City, Mo., and  Wade Talbert  of this place, which occurred at Kansas City, Sept 18.  Mr. Talbert is connected with the Fletcher American National bank. They will reside in Indianapolis. A family reception was given the young couple here by  Mrs. Jane Talbert,  mother of the bridegroom.
Contributed by Janet McColley Franklin


The  Indianapolis  Star
October 24, 1915
Page 51  Column 7
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SHELBYVILLE.
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         Mrs. Jennie Golding  of Kokomo is a guest of  Mr. and Mrs. Will Talbert.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday August 3, 1911
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DIVORCE  FOLLOWS
SUPPORT  COMPLAINT
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Emmett Talbert Makes Sensational
Allegations Against His Wife
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(From Friday’s Daily)
            Emmett Talbert, a well-known resident of this city, has brought suit for a divorce from his wife, Mrs. Zora Talbert, in the Shelby superior court, the complaint being filed Thursday evening by Hord & Adams. Some of the allegations are highly sensational. He declares his wife twice attempted to shoot him with a revolver, that she once threw a lighted oil lamp at him and that she attacked him twice with a butcher knife. He charges further that his wife has an ungovernable temper and that she uses obscene and profane language when addressing the plaintiff. He accused her of associating with unchaste and disreputable persons and of making it generally impossible for her to live with him in peace. The couple were married November 2, 1904. The separation took place August 14, 1911, Mr. Talbert leaving his home at that time in the possession of his wife. He says it will be impossible for him ever to live with Mrs. Talbert again. Mrs. Talbert, it will be recalled by readers of the Democrat, filed suit against her husband, August 15, asking that the court force him to contribute forty dollars per month toward her support. She alleged that her husband abandoned her deliberately and without just cause.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday February 2, 1905
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          James M. Talbert  VS  Jennie M. Talbert. Divorce. Trial finding and judgment granting divorce upon payment of costs.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelby  Democrat
June 16, 1904
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         The case of  Margaret J. Talbert vs. estate of  Frank M. Wycliff  has been settled out of court and the claim dismissed.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
June 1, 1904
Page 2   column 2
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          Mrs. Mary Talbert  of Hanover township, whose death was announced in yesterday's Democrat, it transpires is not dead, but her condition is very critical and her demise may be expected at any moment.  Our informant, who is related to members of the family, stated to the Democrat this morning that he misunderstood a message received by him by phone on yesterday.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
February 19, 1903
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TALBERT
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Arrested for Robbing
Patterson Gives Bond.
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Springer Placed Under Bond by Squire
Keith for His Appearance in Court --
Boquets for Police Officers
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From Daily Democrat Feb. 18.
          James Talbert,  who was implicated by the testimony of  Will Brokering,  Ono Orebaugh  and himself together with  Herb Springer  in the robbing of  George Patterson,  an old soldier, on Monday, gave bond yesterday.  His father,  David Talbert,  of Washington township, going on his bond.  Springer was placed under bond yesterday afternoon by Squire Keith for his appearance in court.  All the defendants are out under $500 bonds.  The Democrat hopes no guilty man will escape and no innocent man be punished.
          This city has been for some time the scene of hold-ups and robberies of various kinds by an unscrupulous gang, and the younger generation coming on seeing these violations of the law going unpunished, have become apt and willing scholars.  What an example to set before the rising generation!
          The prosecuting attorney should bring before the grand jury witnesses whose names he could easily get, if he does not alrady know them, and secure indictuments of other than young boys.  Even if it is necessary to guarantee immunity to the witnesses he may use.  The people are clamoring for the punishmnet of the offenders against the law, and are still throwing boquets at  Marshal Meloy  and  Special Police Officers Marsh  and  Brown, all of whom have shown willingness and alacrity in ridding this city of an undesirable element.
          The Supreme Court has decided repeatedly that when a man takes another man's money and has no intention of giving him an equivalent in value for it, that it is a felony and is puishable by imprisonment.  "Down with the robber, up with the law," is our motto.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
March 28, 1895
Page 3
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          Monday afternoon  Mrs. James Talbert,  who resides with her husband on the  Dave Girard  farm in Washington township, emptied a straw bed tick in her yard, and set fire to it.  The straw was carried by the wind to the roof of the house, setting fire to the building, which was two story, and completely destroying it.  The family succeeded in saving their household goods in the lower rooms, but everything in the upper story was burned.  The farm is owned by  Mr. Jacob Maley,  and the building was one of the first in that section of the county, hjaving been built some fifteen years.  We were unable to learn as to whether any insurance was carried or not.  The loss will probably reach $1,200.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Republican
Shelbyville, Ind.
Wednesday Evening, October 20, 1886
Page 1 column 4
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SAD  ACCIDENT
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Frank Talbert Dangerously Injured This Morning
By a Failing Plank About 9 o'clock this Morning
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          Mr. Frank Talbert  met with a sad accident which may cost him his life. The particulars of the accident are about as follows: At the time above mentioned Mr. Talbert was standing in the new saw-mill building which is in the course of construction. On the first floor where the sawing is to be done were a number of planks laid from beam to beam to assist the men in the work of constructing the building. On these planks rested a plank of solid green oak, eight feet long and two inches thick weighing about sixty pounds which stood perpendicularly to support planks above it. Mr. Talbert was standing slightly bent over watching some work when in some way the top of the plank became loosened and fell. The top end of the plank struck Mr. Talbert on the back part of the head, knocking him with great force to the ground. The workmen gathered around and the injured man was carried to the office. The blow stunned him greatly and when visited by Dr. Morris Drake, he was in a semi-conscious condition. An examination revealed an ugly blow on the head. The outer table of the skull was crushed badly. Mr. Talbert was very sick at the stomach for the first hour or two after his misfortune which was regarded as an unfavorable sign. This however was stopped to a great extent by noon today. The patient was taken to his home where he now lies in a critical condition. Reaction has set in to a great degree and the immediate danger of death from the blow has passed. It is said that troubles never come "single- handed" and this seems true in the case of Mr. Talbert. First the injuries received by his son, next the death of a child, then the burning of his mill and last the accident to himself this morning. It is the hope of his friends that he will speedily recover from the injury received although at this writing his con- dition is considered as critical. Yesterday Mr. Talbert came within an inch of being killed. He was standing in the new saw-mill building in company with other men, when a crow-bar fell through the scuttle of the building striking his right foot and leg seriously injuring the limb. This morning he was walking with a cane and wearing a slipper. LATEST: At 2 o'clock this afternoon, Mr. Talbert was very restless and delirious. Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Republican
Shelbyville, Indiana
Wednesday Evening, September 22, 1886
Page 1, column 2
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DESTRUCTIVE  FLAMES
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Burning of Talbert's Saw-Mill
and Heavy Loss of Property
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         About 1:30 this morning, in the eastern part of this city, the heavens were illuminated by a brilliant light which indicated that this city was again visited by another destructive fire.  The alarm was at once turned in and Night Watchman Williams, who was on the Public Square, fired his revolver several times and then ran to the engine-house in the first ward and vigorously rang the bell which awoke hundreds of people in the central and western parts of the city. As the sleepy citizens rolled out upon the street the first thought was that  Stewart & Blakely's  planing mill on Jackson street was the victim of the angry flames but this thought was soon dispelled by approaching nearer when the people were horrified to find that the large saw-mill of Frank Talbert, located on East Hendricks street near the  J. M. & I. railroad, was being devoured by the flames and the wagon works and neighboring houses in great danger of going to ashes under the rapid progress of the destructive element.  The fire company responded promptly but the hose reel was quite slow in getting to the scene.  No arrangement being made in regard to hauling the hose-reel, Mort Sorden  was depended upon to cart the hose to the fire.  This he did with one of his livery horses as quickly as he could, but by that time the flames had completely enveloped the saw-mill building, leaped over to the office next to the wagon-works and the sparks had fired the frame barn of  David Hill  on the north side of the street.  By this time it was after 2 o'clock and apparent that the saw-mill could not be saved and something must be done to save valuable property adjoining.  When the fire first started the air was calm but soon a gust came up which carried the flames, sparks and smoke more to the northeast and away from the wagon-works.  The roaring of the flames was terrific as they leaped heavenward and this was greatly intensified by the escaping steam from the large saw-mill boiler.  This was the momentous occasion when the first practical test of the water-works was to be made.  The test on the 15th of the month appeared to be satisfactory but now that the raging elements were to be suppressed would they fill the bill and take the place of the steam engine which in years past, with all its defects, had done good work and saved an immense amount of property.  The people watched the movements of the fire company with great fears in their minds and yet with strong hopes that they would be successful.  The hose was first attached to the hydrant at the corner of Hendricks and Vine and the water turned on.  The firemen approached the flames with their nozzles glistening and ready for the contest of water vs. fire, when soon the cries went up "the water works are a failure," "the nozzles are full of stones." The pressure appeared very light and the water was not thrown over thirty feet and then sprayed so that it was not effective. Two more hose pipes were attached to a hydrant at Pike street but this was no better than the first. The firemen were almost powerless and could only play around the edges of the fire and keep the flames from spreading. The main fire finally died away simply because there was nothing more for it to burn. At the late hour at which the fire department began to throw water it would have been impossible to have saved the saw-mill proper but if the water-works had been satisfactory and the pipes free from obstructions, as they should have been, the reputation of the water-works would have been sustained and much valuable property saved. It is also stated that only one of the water-works engines was at work as the other got out of repair yesterday and could not be used in this emergency. As stated above the saw mill building was a complete ruin and with it all the valuable machinery and lumber, among which was considerable oak. Many theories are advanced as to the origin of the fire but the exact cause will probably never come to the light of day. At that time in the morning it looks as if an incendiary might have been at work but there are other reasons just as plausible as this one. The engine was kept running last night until 9 o'clock and as the fire appeared to have started in the vicinity of the engine it may have caught from it. About 12 o'clock the freight train on the  J.M. & I. road, passed along and a spark from the engine might have been carried to the saw dust pile and thus ignited the building. The loss to Mr. Talbert is estimated at $10,000 but we think this is too large and probably $7,000 would be a fair estimate. It is said to be covered with insurance policies to the amount of $4,000 but we are unable to state the amount exactly or the companies as Mr. Talbert and his insurance agent declined to furnish them for publication.  The barn of Mr. Hill, which was an old "trap", was burned down and in it were articles valued as follows:  Second hand buggy, $40;  running-gears of wagon, $15;  two barrels and one box of hair, $15;  three stoves, $20;  one bedstead, $3;  one barrel cement, $3.75;  one box of plaster paris $1.50;  three pair of plow-gears $3;  three pitchforks 50 cents;  eighteen barrels cow feed, $2.50;  paper boards, $5;  five plows, $10.  Mr. Hill carried no insurance.  In getting out to the fire he lost his pocket-book.  Mr. Talbert's office is not badly damaged and can be easily repaired.  A freight car standing on the J. M. & I. switch was damaged to some extent by the heat.
Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Thursday, April 13, 1882
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LOCAL  NEWS
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          Frank Talbert  ships two car loads of lumber to Indianapolis tonight.
Contributed by D. Darlene Palmer

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