Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Thompson


The  Indianapolis  Star
Tuesday, May 18, 1920
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WOMAN  PASSES  CENTURY  MARK
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Mrs. Minerva Thompson of Waldron
Active and Happy on 100th Birthday
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          (Special to the Indianapolis Star.)
   
       SHELBYVILLE, IND.,  May 17 -- One of the passing events of historical interest and importance to Shelby county will be the celebration of the 100th birthday of Mrs. Minerva Thompson, which will be observed tomorrow at her home in Waldron, where she has resided continuously for the last thirty-five years.  A century has not deprived Mrs. Thompson of the activity which has marked her long and useful life and the reception which has been arranged will be enjoyed by her as well as by the many hundreds who have planned to visit her.
          Arrangements for the celebration include a dinner at the noon hour, at which her relatives and many friends will be present, and an open house during the afternoon  at the home, which is now a bevy of flowers, the gifts of friends and acquaintances throughout the county and the state.  A huge floral piece from the residents of the town of Waldron was among the many beautiful remembrances.
          Despite her advanced years, Mrs. Thompson is wonderfully well preserved, and possesses a memory that is remarkable.  She is also able to superintend her household and take an interest in passing events.  Coming from a family that was long lived, it is not so uncommon to her that today she reached the age of 100.
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BORN  IN  KENTUCKY
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          She is the daughter of the late  James and Drucilla Burns, and was born on the farm of her father in Lewis county, Kentucky on May 18, 1820.  The family was of Virginia origin, where Mr. Burns was born in 1778, and where he ent the years during and following the revolutionary war.  In the war of 1812 he shouldered a musket in defense of his country.  Her father died in 1878 at the age of 100 years.  For the first nine years of her life  Mrs. Thompson lived in the "Blue Grass" state, coming with her parents to Indiana in 1829, after her father had established a log cabin home in a forest clearing in Rush county.  Later this home was supplanted with a large brick home, the first in this section.
          The schooling of that day was very crude, says Mrs. Thompson, and the teachers of the "spared the rod and spoil the child" kind of disposition of one teacher causing him to receive punishment from fathers of the pupils on one occasion.
          Her marriage to  Alfred Gregg Thompson  occurred in 1845 and the couple moved to Shelby county near St. Paul in 1851.  Since 1885 Mrs. Thompson has lived in the pretty home which she now occupies in Waldron.  Speaking of the living conditions at the time of her marriage, Mrs. Thompson says that people lived very simply and only few had carpets on the floors of their homes.  One of the first things she can remember doing after her marriage is the making of a rag rug for the floor of her home, which placed her in an enviable position among her neighbors.  Stoves were rarely used and because her parents did not possess one she and her husband also did without this commodity.  Mr. Thompson died in 1890.
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MOTHER  OF  SEVEN  CHILDREN.
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          Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thompson.  Three died in infancy and two sons,  Frank  and  James Thompson,  passed away several years ago.  Her daughter, Miss Anna Thompson, who is 70 years old, lives with her mother in Waldron and also works in a store there; she appears to be about 40 years old.  Mrs. Andy J. Ensminger  of this city is the other daughter.  Mrs. Eliza Cummins, 94 years old, who resides with her at Waldron and like Mrs. Thompson, is agile and active and a very good conversationalist.  Another sister is  Mrs. Olive B. Smith, 79 years old, and a brother  Henry Burns, 81 years old, both residing near Bluffton.  There are three grandchildren,  Mrs. Leo Morgan,  Dawes Thompson  and  Mrs. Ezra Morgan  of this county, and two great-grandchildren,  Thompson Morgan  and  Nell Morgan  of Shelbyville.
          Throughout her life, Mrs. Thompson says, she has tried to mold her life on the merits of truth and honesty and that she enjoys good, clean pleasure today as much as she ever did.  When the weather is fair she likes automobiling and it is a delight for her to work among her flowers and garden.  Also very remarkable is the fact that her enjoyment of a hearty meal is one of her boasts in passing the century mark she is not so fond of sweets but must have substantial foods, and has a particular craving for meats of all kinds.
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TRULY  AN  OPTIMIST.
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          In talking of her natal event, Mrs. Thompson says it is unbelievable that she has lived 100 years, and attributes her present active condition to her love of work and her active life.  She scorns the person who upon reaching an advanced age sits down and just waits for the ned to come, saying that though 100 years old, she finds just living and doing what good she can is really a great pleasure for her.  She is truly an optimist, and laughingly describes the pranks of her girlhood years.
          Mrs. Thompson is a member of the St. Paul Christian Church, she has read the Bible through two times, and the New Testament entirely through twenty-two times.
Contributed by Marsha Ensminger


The  Indianapolis  Star
May 19, 1916
Page 4   Column 4
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          SHELBYVILLE--Mrs. Minerva Thompson  of Waldron celebrated her ninety-sixth birthday anniversary Thursday.  She assisted in preparing the birthday dinner and can read with ease.  Her husband,  Alfred Thompson,  died twenty-two years ago.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
September 12, 1915
Page 43   Column 5
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Mrs. Charles Thompson  has gone to Monongahela, Pa., to visit her mother,  Mrs. S. M. Foster, for a few weeks.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
July 11, 1915
Page 30   Column 7
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Chenhall  and children of Evansville are here to remain for two weeks, the guests of  Mr. and Mrs. Francis L. Thompson.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Indianapolis  Star
May 9, 1915
Page 11
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SHELBYVILLE.
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          Mr. and Mrs. Louis Thompson  and son and daughter are here from Milton visiting Mr. Thompson's parents  Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Thompson.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla and Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Wednesday, June 12, 1912
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          T. W. Thompson, of Blue Ridge, drove home from Indianapolis yesterday in a new Krit touring car he had purchased in that city Monday thru J. R. Marshall, the local agent.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Logansport  Journal
Thursday, February 29, 1912
Page 4,  column 6
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UNIVERSALISTS  TO  OPEN
HOME  FOR  AGED  WOMEN
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          The chief business of the midyear Universalist convention of Indiana, which began its two days' session at Indianapolis yesterday will be the consideration of the question of opening the  Thompson Home for Aged Women  at Waldron, Shelby county, the coming spring or summer.  Three years ago  Delos H. Thompson,  a retired merchant of Waldron, left by will his entire fortune of about $80,000 to the Universalist convention if Indiana, one of the conditions of the gift being that the income from half the estate should remain as a permanent endowment for the D. H. Thompson Home for Aged Women.
          The will directed that the Thompson homestead in Waldron, a large brick house with forty-three acres of ground, should be the location of this home and serve as the nucleus for other building to be added as needed.  The estate consisted largely of farm lands, seven hundred acres, most of which was in Shelby county.
          The will was contested, but the litigation has resulted in favor of the Universalist convention.  Some of the farming lands have been sold and the money is in the hands of the trustees of the convention.
          A proposition is before the convention for the purchase of the Methodist church and grounds at Waldron, adjoining the Thompson home property, for use as a Universalist church.
Contributed by John Ballard


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Monday, September 29, 1907
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          Russell Thompson  returned to this city [Shelbyville] last evening from Washington, D. C., where he has been working for several months.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday January 4, 1906
Page 7 column 2
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          Mrs. Minerva Thompson  of Waldron is visiting her daughter, Mrs. A. J. Ensminger  of south Harrison street.  Mrs. Thompson is wonderfully well preserved for her years, being able to superintend her household duties.  She was born in Lewis County, Kentucky, in 1820, but when three years of age her parents removed to Indiana, and settled in Rush county.  She was married to  Alfred G. Thompson  in 1845, and moved to Shelby county in 1851, in which county she has ever since resided.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, November 16, 1905
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          Mrs. Harold Thompson, of Indianapolis, spent Sunday here.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, September 21, 1905
Page 1
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          Mrs. Mamie Stevens  daughter of  Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Thompson, of west Washington street, and wife of  Prof. Frank Stevens, of Terre Haute, has accepted the position of teacher of Latin and Literature in the high school of Montezuma.  Mrs. Stevens is a graduate of the state normal school and has had the best of training for the position she now takes.  The Democrat predicts that her stay at Montezuma will be extremely profitable for the Parke county city.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Patriot
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Decmeber 14, 1905
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          William Thompson  ,  who died the other day at Shelbyville, Ind., aged seventy-seven years, was known as "the man who sold his gold for /42.75."  During the Civil war Thompson accumulated $3,100 in gold, which he carried to Indianapolis and sold at a premium of $2.75, netting him $7,525 within ten cents of the highest price ever paid for gold.
Contributed by John Addison Ballard


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, August 3, 1905
Page 1, column 5
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BULLET  HAS  BEEN  REMOVED
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Dr. Kennedy Takes Bullet From
Injured Girl -- Men Arrested
Give Bond.
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(From Tuesday's Daily.)
          Dr. W. H. Kennedy, who is attending  Miss Mary Thompson, the young lady who was mysteriously shot at last Saturday night near the old woolen mills while returning to this city with  Lloyd Wickham  from the home of her sister, Mrs. Haze Stafford, reports that her condition is very promising.  Her temperature was normal today and the soreness is not so painful as it was yesterday or at any other time since the shooting.
          The doctor probed again for the bullet this morning and succeeded in finding the piece of lead about two inches below the skin.  He was successful in removing the bullet and now has it in his possession and it will be turned over to the officers to be used in the investigation of the case.  "There are no indications of blood poisoning," said Dr. Kennedy, "and I feel that there is now no danger."
          The bullet shows on its end the prints of the fabric of which the corset was made, and through which the bullet passed.  It is thought to be a bullet from a thirty-two caliber [the article continues but my copy ends here -- pmf].
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
July 27, 1905
Page 8
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          A fine line of Willow clothes baskets, and market baskets at  Thompson's.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Wednesday, April 2, 1902
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          Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Thompson  desire to thank the friends and relatives for their kind assistance and sympathy during the recent illness and death of Mrs. Thompson's mother,  Mrs. Anna Kendall.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Thursday, May 23, 1899
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Attention  Farmers.
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          My Germand coach horse, Edward 683 and Jack, have recovered from the grippe and are now ready for service.
O. M. THOMPSON,        
Fairland.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, October 7, 1898
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          Mr. W. C. Thompson, who lives south of town on the Norristown pike, has purchased of  John R. Messick  the old  Goodrich  property on South Harrison street.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Indiana  State  Journal
October 21, 1896
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          SHELBYVILLE, Ind., Oct. 17. -- The challenge of  Rev. James Comer,  of Howard county, and of  Mr. Maston Dashiel,  of Indianapolis, as to the numbers in their families that will vote for  McKinley,  is easily beaten by  Mr. Elias P. Thompson,  of Shelbyville, Ind.  Mr. Thompson cast his first vote for  William Henry Harrison  for President and has voted for every Republican nominee since the birth of the party and will vote for William McKinley.  He has eight sons and six sons-in-law, five gransons and three grand-sons-in-law, a total of twenty-three, who will vote for McKinley.  Of this number twelve will vote in this State.  Mr. Thompson is the father of State Statistician Thompson, of  Judge W. A. Thompson,  of Muncie, and of  J. W. Thompson,  attorney, of Winchester.
Contributed by John Addison Ballard


The  Shelby  Democrat
July 18, 1895
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          Mr. S. M. Thompson reports the following wheat yields, south of the city:  Milton Jeffers had twenty-five acres, which yielded four bushels per acre;  Cameron Limpus, twenty-six acres, yield six bushels per acre;  Perry Amos, thirty acres, yield nine bushels per acre, and  S. M. Thompson, sixty acres, yield twelve bushels per acre.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, December 27, 1894
Page 3 column 4
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          'Squire John G. Thompson  claims that himself, wife and children sat down to the largest turkey yesterday in Shelbyville.  His bird weighed thrity pounds, even.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, January 5, 1892
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Miss Iva Mauzy,  of Rushville, who has been the guest of  Miss Bertha Thompson,  returned to her home last evening.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Saturday, January 12, 1889
Page 4   column 1
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          Mrs. Delores Thompson,  who has been visiting  Mrs. T. S. Caughey,  returned home to Waldron last night.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 27, 1886
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L O C A L    N E W S.
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          Charles Thompson  was fined $10.80 by 'Squire Ellis this morning for an assault and batter on  Charles Hugle, Jr.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, January 26, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Charley Thompson  and  Charley Hugle, Jr.,  had a set to on East Elizabeth street last night in which Hugle was done up.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Saturday, January 23, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          The jury in the case of  Mary F. Holman  vs.  Edward C. Thompson  came in with a verdict at four o'clock yesterday afternoon after being out about an hour.  The verdict was for the defendant, who, when he heard it, broke down and testified his gratitude by vigorously shaking hands with the jury.  Just at this time  Court Bailiff Burk  slapped him on the back and said:  "Cigars on you, Thompson,"  and the latter promptly responded, and soon all were smoking over his success.  The jury took but three ballots.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, January 22, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Thos. B. Adams  made a speech for the defense in the  Holman-Thompson  paternity case this morning, and  Col. Oyler  made the closing speech for the prosecution, closing just after dinner.  Judge Hord then delivered his charge to the jury and they retired for deliberation.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming 


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Thursday, January 21, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          Flem Thompson  writes from Lebanon that he will arrive here Saturday night to see the boys -- and girls.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, January 20, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          The court room was crowded this morning, with spectators, who listened with breathless attention to the sensational testimony adduced in the case of  Mary Holman  vs.  Edward Thompson.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, January 19, 1886
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LOCAL  NEWS.
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          The sensational paternity suit filed by  Mary F. Holman  against  Edward C. Thompson,  and brought here on a change of venue from Johnson county, where it was tried last term of court and a verdict given against the defendant, who secured a new trial is being heard by Judge Hord and a jury here to-day.  The jury in the case is an exceptionally good one, and is composed of the following gentlemen:  John Byers,  Fred Stephans,  James Cooper,  L. C. Powell,  Henry Horst,  S. P. McCrea,  S. B. Morris,  David Tull,  J. W. Wilson,  J. H Leefers,  J. K. Bowers  and  Frank Roth.  The prosecuting witness, Mary F. Holman, who has been an inmate of the county asylum in Johnson county for the past year, claims to be in her twenty-second year, and that her baby, a boy, was born in March, 1885, and that E. C. Thompson is the father.  Miss Holman is an ordinary looking, slight built young woman, with dark hair, light complexion and eyes that are large and snappy, especially when she looks at the defendant.  She answers the questions put to her in a quick, decided manner, and seems to be abundantly able to keep up with the procession.  Mr. Edward C. Thompson, the defendant in the case, is a prominent citizen of Johnson county, a married man, and well-to-do.  He is about forty-five or forty-eight years of age, a little below the medium height, with hair and chin whiskers slightly tinged with gray.  He is a determined looking man, and said to be full of fight.  The defense is represented by Overstreet & Hunter, of Franklin, Adams & Hackney and Adams & Michner of this city.  Miss Holman's attorneys are Messrs. Oyler & Johnson of Franklin, and Love, Major & Morrison of this city.  There is a small army of witnesses, and a hot and sensational fight is expected.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Daily  Republican
Monday, July 21, 1884
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LOCAL NEWS
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          Flem Thompson went to Greensburg on Sunday night. It must have been very important business that took him so suddenly.
Copied by Marcia Stinson


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Wednesday, October 3, 1883
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LOCAL  NEWS
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          Charles Thompson,  father of the well-known  John G. Thompson,  who resides in Noble township, last week, sold sixteen steers, aged two years, that average 1,240 pounds.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Volunteer
Thursday, January 3, 1878
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          William A. Thompson, brother of the editor of the Republican, formerly a resident of this city and now of Winchester, Indiana, is visiting friends here this week.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
July 13, 1870
Page 3 column 2
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          Some fourteen couple of our young folds organized a dancing party, and went out last evening to the residence of  Alfred Thompson,  near Cynthiana, where we understand they enjoyed themselves hugely on the "exactly green" (as they say in pic-nic bills) "tripping the light, fantastic toe.".
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


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