Shelby  County  Indiana
Newspaper  Articles

Tindall


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Tuesday, November 12, 1935
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FUNERAL  'INVITES'  WERE  CUSTOM  THEN
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Old 'Invitation' Carries Picture of Cortege At Top
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          It will interest some people to know that back in the [18]50's funeral invitations were issued to relatives and friends of the deceased.
          C. F. Fix, local funeral director, has in his possession an invitation dated October 9, 1855.  It reads as follows:
          Yourself and family are respectfully requested to attend the funeral of  William Tindall  on tomorrow, Tuesday, October 9, 1855.  The friends will convene at the residence of the deceased at 1 o'clock p.m.  Funeral service at 2 p.m., sermon by the Rev. E. B. Smith.  Masonic rites will be conducted by the Rev. John W. Sullivan.
          The invitation is on a paper about six by eight inches and has a picture at the top.  It is framed.
Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday, September 21, 1925
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Society
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Committee Meetings.
          The service commitee[sic] of the Y. W. C. A. board will meet at the club rooms Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock.  Mrs. Carl Tindall  is chairman.  The girls' work committee of which  Mrs. Russell Morris  is the chairman, will meet Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday April 16, 1925
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MOTHER SEEKS CUSTODY BABE
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Mrs. Glenn Means Tindall Has
Filed Petition for Writ Habeas Corpus
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ALLEGES  TAKEN  BY  RUSE
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Declares Husband and His Mother
Should Not Have Care of the Child
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          A petition for a writ of habeas corpus, in which she seeks the possession and custody of her son, age two years, has been filed in the Shelby Circuit Court by  Mrs. Louise Rapp Tindall against  Glenn Means Tindall, and his mother,  Mrs. Maude Tindall, both of this city. Williams and Pell are attorneys for the plaintiff.
          Mrs. Tindall makes the charge that her husband obtained possession of the child through a ruse, after they had separated in California, and that he and his mother brought it to this city. The wife was in Shelbyville Wednesday conferring with her attorneys. She stated that she had been refused permission to see the child.
          The petition for the writ states that the couple was married November 18, 1920, at Kokomo. The petitioner was a resident of Kokomo at that time, and Mr. Tindall was a supervisor of music in the Kokomo high school. Mrs. Tindall is a daughter of Truman Rapp, of Hollywood, California, formerly of Kokomo. Mr. Rapp is a man of considerable wealth, and is the owner of a chain of stores.
          Mr. and Mrs. Tindall separated on February 16, 1925, while living at Santa Ana, California. They have one child, Glenn Means Tindall II, who was two years old on February 7, 1925. The mother, through the court action here, is seeking the custody of the child, who is now in the possession of the father and the grandmother.
          Mrs. Tindall says that from the time of the separation from her husband, she had lived with her parents at Hollywood, California, and had the sole custody and care of the child up to March 25, 1925. She states that she permitted her husband to have the child at times to visit at his home in Santa Ana, where he and his mother continued to make their home after the separation.
          On March 25, 1925, Mrs. Tindall states that her husband called, saying that he desired to take the child for a visit, promising to return the boy to his mother on the following Sunday.  Because of the promise, the petitioner says that she permitted the father to take the baby.  Mr. Tindall failed to return the child, Mrs. Tindall says.
          She made an investigation and states that she found Mr. Tindall had taken part of their furniture and wedding presents; had sold their automobile; had withdrawn the babyís bank account, and with his mother and the baby had come to Shelbyville.  She says that she has since been unable to see the child.
          Mrs. Tindall states in her petition that she has always conducted herself in the right manner towards her husband, and that she has a strong attachment for their child.
          The petitioner sets out in her petition for a writ of habeas corpus that her father, Trumann Rapp, is a man of considerable wealth.  She says that she has property in her own right, to the amount of approximately $15,000.  Mrs. Tindall says that she and her father will maintain a home at any suitable place for herself and the child.
          The wife states in her petition that Mr. Tindall and his mother are not fit and proper persons to have the care of the child, because of the child being so young and she has always had its care.
          Mrs. Tindall says that her husband is indebted to her in the sum of $7,000 and that he has no income of his own except that from his own work and labor.  She also asserts that her husbandís mother, Mrs. Maude Tindall, has no large amount of property; that she is in poor health; is a nervous wreck; and is not physically able to take care of the child. The petitioner says that Glenn Tindall is neither physically or financially able to take care of the child.
          Mrs. Tindall says that before their separation her husband was irritable, had a violent temper and was overbearing. She stated that he would become angry and would pout for hours at a time, and that he would curse in the presence of the petitioner and their child.
          The wife also asserts in her petition for the writ that Mrs. Maude Tindall, her mother-in-law, was jealous of her, and constantly interfered with her management of the child. The wife says that her mother-in-law criticized her and sought to cause trouble between her and her husband. Mrs. Tindall asks for the temporary custody of the child, and for a writ of habeas corpus granting the custody of the child to her.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Indianapolis  Star
November 26, 1915
Page 4  Column 4
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State  Briefs
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         SHELBYVILLE -- Property owners along the Norristown road between Shelbyville and the Winchester M. E. Church, a distance of six miles, have signed an agreement to plant trees along the pike, sixty feet apart.  An effort is being made to extend the agreement to include that part of the road between the church and Flatrock and the highway is to be called the Golden road.  Mrs. Nancy Tucker and  Marcus Young  have offered all the trees free of charge.  The plan was originated by  John A. Tindall,  a lawyer of this city.
Contributed by Virginia Latta Curulla


The  Shelbyville  Democrat
Thursday, June 13, 1912
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          U. E. Tindall was at Indianapolis today on legal business.
Submitted by Phyllis Miller Fleming


A Shelbyville, Indiana, newspaper
March 22, 1912
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A  NEW  REPUBLICAN  COLLECTOR
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          Mr. Glen Tindall,  son of Attorney  U. E. Tindall,  has taken a position with the Evening Republican as collector and mailing clerk.  He succeeds  Mr. Frank Dunn,  who goes to Florida Sunday.  Mr. Tindall is one of Shelbyville's bright and capable young men.  He finished the High school course in January and is now taking some post graduate work.  He is capable and courteous and we bespeak for him a warm welcome and a generous response when he calls to see you.
Copied by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Philadelphia  Inquirer
26 Aug 1911
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SHOOTING  IS  LAID  TO
COURT  OF  HONOR  CASE
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Supreme Director Tindall Killed on
Street at Shelbyville, Ind.
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Special to The Inquirer.
          SHELBYVILLE, Ind., Aug. 25. -- Chas. Tindall,  38, lawyer, Supreme Director of the Court of Honor Lodge, was fatally shot on a crowded street today by  Edward C. Van Pelt,  whose wife if the sister of United States  Senator Works, of California.
          Van Pelt was sitting on a bench in front of a store talking to  Thomas Whitaker,  one of the officers of the local Court of Honor lodge, when he saw Tindall approaching.  He got up, walked directly in front of Tindall and when within two feet of him fired twice.  The first shot struck him in the abdomen, the second in the arm.  Tindall died in the store without regaining consciousness.
          Van Pelt in a statement at the jail said that Tindall made a charge to the national officers of the Court of Honor that Mrs. Van Pelt while secretary of the local lodge had misused large sums.  Mrs. Van Pelt rather than stand the strain of such a battle for her right, withdrew from the lodge.  Van Pelt said that since then Tindall had not passed him on the street without sneering at him.  Mrs. Van Pelt is prostrated.
Contributed by John Addison Ballard
Note:  Coverage of some of the murder trial is on the VanPelt news page.


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Friday, September 22, 1899
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          His friends were pleased to see  Mr. John Tindall  at his office to-day, John has just passed through a very severe spell of sickness.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday, October 7, 1898
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          Mr. M. G. Tindall, who had one of his eyes operated on at Indianapolis a few days ago, has returned home.  It is thought the operation will prove successful.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, October 17, 1895
Page 2, column 2
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THEIR  GOLDEN  WEDDING
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Celebrated Yesterday By Mr. & Mrs. Job Tindall
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          (Thursday, October 10) Fifty years ago yesterday Job D. Tindall and Susanna Warner, were married in the southern part of this county, and in honor of the occasion their golden wedding was celebrated at the old homestead, four miles south of town yesterday.  Mr. Tindall is past seventy-five years old, Mrs. Tindall is sixty-seven years old and came to this county with her parents, George Warner and wife, from Ohio, when only two years old.  They have resided in this county ever since, and at the old home south of town for fifty-four years, (save the past five since when they have resided in Waldron).  Mr. Tindall was from a family of eight children, only three of whom are now living:  himself; George W. Tindall, of this city, and  A. C. Tindall, who has been living in Kansas for the past twenty-five years.  Mrs. Tindall was from a family of fourteen children, only three of whom are now living, herself, George Warner, of Jackson township and Mariah Bloom, wife of  Calvin Bloom, of Hope, Indiana.  They are the parents of fourteen children, eight of whom are living:  Maggie F.,   Dr. C. A. and Mrs. E. Tindall of this city,  A. W. Tindall,  Estella C. Lemasters,  Arizona,  Agnew  and  Jesse W. Tindall who reside in the southern part of the county, and  Josephine Corlin, who lives in Indianapolis.  All of the above mentioned relatives were present excepting A. C. Tindall.  They have thirty seven living grandchildren and one great grand child, and ten grandchildren who have died.  There were a number of valuable presents among which was a new phaeton, presented by the children, a set of harness presented by the grandchildren, a fine base rocker upholstered in old gold, by George W. Tindall, and some other presents.  There was but one person there who was present at the marriage ceremony that person being George Warner, although Malinda Tindall, who resides south of town was present at the affair.  A bountiful dinner of everything that appetite could desire was served to fifty or sixty guests.
Submitted by Barb Huff


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, December 27, 1894
Page 3, column 1
----------           Job D. Tindall  and wife, of Waldron, are spending the holidays with their daughters,  Mrs. Wm. Caslin  and  Mrs. James Agnew,  at Indianapolis.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Monday, September 4, 1893
Page 4
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          Mr. William McCann is here from Champayne, Ill., on a visit with Mr. G. W. Tindall and family.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
September 11, 1890
Page 4   column 4
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          Marsh Tindall  met with a painful accident about eight o'clock Tuesday morning while removing a table at Conrey, Birely & Co's finishing rooms.  In attempting to lower the table from an immense stack, piled up against the wall, one of them fell and struck him a stunning blow on the head, felling him to the floor.  He was at once removed to his residence in the south part of the city.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Wednesday, June 25, 1890
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        Harry Tindall  is at home from Pine Bluff, Ark.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Tuesday, October 8, 1889
Page 1
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ADDITIONAL  LOCAL.
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          A son was born to  Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Tindall  of Noblesville yesterday.  Mr. Tindall was a former risident of this city.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, September 11, 1879
Page 3, column 4
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CRADLE -- ALTAR -- TOMB.
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Married.
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          BISHOP - TINDALL -- On the 4th day of September, 1879, by  Rev. John Reece,  Mr. James B. Bishop  to  Miss Lydia E. Tindall.  All of Shelby county, Indiana.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Thursday, February 7, 1878
Page 3
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Family  Gatherings.
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          Mrs. Melinda Tindall,  an old resident of this county, was in this city on Saturday, and on her return home in the evening was surprised to find about 65 of her friends and neighbors gathered at her house.  Immediately after her arrival she was invited to set down to a sumptuous supper, prepared by her daughters and relatives as a surprise, on the anniversary of her 52nd birht day.  And they didn't forget to furnish samples of the cake to the printer.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming

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