Shelby  County  Indiana
Obituaries

Caughey / Coy


The  Shelbyville  News
Wednesday, September 25, 1957
----------
WAYNE  COY,  53
SHELBY  COUNTY
NATIVE,  STRICKEN
----------
          INDIANAPOLIS (UP) -- Wayne Coy,  53, a newspaperman who skyrocketed to state and national political prominence and became a radio-television executive, died unexpectedly Tuesday night of a heart seizure.
          Coy was attending a meeting at the Indianapolis Athletic Club when he was stricken.  He died about two hours later in Methodist Hospital.
          He was president of WFBM and WFBM-TV since the Time magazine interests bought the Indianapolis stations last spring and sent Coy back "home" from Albuquerque, N. Mex., where he operated radio and television stations.
          Coy was born in Shelby County, and began a newspaper career on the Franklin Evening Star staff.  He was city editor when he left to buy the Delphi Citizen, a weekly in 1930.
          Two years later, Coy became a secretary to then Gov. Paul V. McNutt and served during the Democratic governmental reorganization days from 1933.  He was first director of the State Department of Public Welfare and state and regional director of the Governor's Commission on Unemployment Relief.
          When McNutt's term as governor ended, Coy became his administrative assistant when McNett was made high commissioner to the Philippines in 1937.
          Later, Coy became a member of the inner circle of assistants to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  He was Roosevelt's liason representative to the Office of Emergency Management assistnat budget director and chairman of the Federal Communications Commission during various parts of the Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman presidential terms.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday May 18, 1931
Page 6 column 1
----------
DEATH  OCCURS          
          AT  MAJOR  HOSPITAL
-------------------
Miss Lida Caughey, Age 72 Years
Succumbs Saturday To Apoplexy
---------------------
ILL  PAST  SIX  WEEKS
      
----------
          The death of  Miss Lida Caughey, age 72 years, occurred Saturday night at 8:00 o’clock at the Major Hospital where she had been confined for the past six weeks following a stroke of apoplexy.
          The deceased was born in New Paris, Ohio on October 12, 1858, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Caughey.  She came to this city with her parents early in life and attended the local schools and graduated from the Shelbyville high school.  For many years she was an employe of the J. H. Akers store and after that concern went out of business, she worked for the S. B. Morris Company.  She was a member of the First Presbyterian church and the Rebekah lodge.
           There are no relatives of the immediate family surviving.  Funeral services will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Fox, 40 West Franklin street at ten o’clock Tuesday morning, with Dr. L. O. Richmond officiating.  Burial will be in the Forest Hill cemetery in charge of Charles M. Ewing.  Friends may call at the Fox home any time after five o’clock this evening.
Contributed by Barb Huff
Picture from Boetcker's Picturesque Shelbyville, c 1912.


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Tuesday October 15, 1912
Page 1 column 3
----------
DEATHS  AND  FUNERALS
----------
           Mrs. Adaline Johnson Caughey, after an illness of several months, the result of senility, died at her home on North Harrison street, this city, this morning, aged seventy-nine years, one month and fourteen days.  The deceased was one of the best known women in Shelbyville, having resided here many years.  She was married to George W. Caughey, April 26, 1856.  They came to Shelbyville in 1871.  Mr. Caughey died on November 11, 1883.  Mrs. Caughey was a member of the First Christian church of this city and was a good Christian woman.  Surviving her is a daughter,  Miss Lydia Caughey; also several nieces and nephews.  She was the mother of  James Caughey,  for many years before his death the city editor of the  Republican.  The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at her late home, the Rev. Cloyd Goodnight officiating.  He will be assisted by the Rev. Earl North.  Ralph J. Edwards will be in charge.
Contributed by Barb Huff


A  Shelbyville  Newspaper
January 15, 1908
----------
THOMAS  S. CAUGHEY  DIED  THIS  MORNING
----------
One of Shelbyville's Oldest and Best-Known
Citizens Dies After a Short Illness
----------
          Thos. S. Caughey  died last evening at his home, 45 west Mechanic street on paralysis.  He was born in Ohio, April 6, 1820, making him at the time of death eighty-seven years, nine months and nine days of age.  He was married to  Keziah Kelly, April 4, 1849.  They lived as happy companions forty-nine years, she having died July 3, 1898.  He has been an invalid, totally blind, for twelve years.  During these years he has been patient and cheerful, never complaining of his affliction.  Mrs. Elizabeth Floyd has devoted her entire time for the care of Mr. Caughey during the last ten years of his life.  She has been kind and painstaking in her task.  He was a lifelong, staunch republican, never voting any other than the republican ticket and never missed voting at an election until the fall of 1906, when he was confined to his home.
           The funeral services will be held at his home at 3:30 p. m. Friday, the Rev. George M. Smith officiating.  For friends wishing to view the remains the casket will be open from 4 p. m. until 8 p. m. Thursday and from 10 a. m. until 3 p. m. Friday.  Interment in Forest Hill cemetery in charge of Marshall G. Tindall.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelby  Republican
Friday, July 29, 1898
================
          Kesiah, wife of  Thomas S. Caughey, died at her home, No. 45 West Mechanic street, at eight o'clock p.m. Saturday, July 23, after an illness of three weeks.  She was born in Preble county, Ohio, December 21, 1827, making her at the time of her death seventy one years old.  She was married to Thomas S. Caughey April 4, 1849, in New Paris, Ohio, and came to Shelbyville March 10, 185[?].  She leaves a husband and a large circle of friends who mourn her loss.  Funeral services were held at the house at 3:30 o'clock p.m. Tuesday, July 26.  Rev Guthrie, of Logansport, officiating, assisted by Elder Groom, of this city.  The casket was open from 9 a.m. to three p.m. Tuesday.  Interment in Forest Hill cemetery in charge of Edwards & Hageman.  Mrs. Caughey was one of the best known women in this city and her death will be generally lamented.  She was of a plain, quiet disposition but was true and loyal to her friends and neighbors.  Her kindness was proverbial and her acts of charity many.  Her death has removed an old and valued resident.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Daily  Democrat
Monday January 9, 1893
Page 1 column 3
----------
JAMES  T. CAUGHEY
----------
His Death Occurs at 12:11 Sunday Morning
----------
In The Bloom of Manhood He is Called From Earth
----------
The Adage "Death Loves a Shining Mark"
----------
Is Certainly Exemplified in This Instance
----------
Shelby Lodge No. 39 of Which He Was An Honored Member
With the K. of P.’s Will Have Charge of the Funeral Services
Which Occur From the First Presbyterian Church,
Tuesday Afternoon at 1:30 O’clock
----------
          The death of  James T. Caughey, editor of the Republican, occurred at the home of his mother, on North Harrison Street, Sunday morning at 12:30 o’clock.  For months the young man had been a sufferer from the dreaded disease, consumption, but not until Saturday morning, early did his condition become alarming to his mother.  At the time mentioned he had a severe hemorrhage, which so weakened the sufferer that he grew constantly worse, and at eight o’clock Saturday evening, he became unconscious, and remained so until his death, four and a half hours later.  It was truly a sad, deathful scene.  There stood at his side a widowed mother and a fatherless sister, and several other intimate friends, who, with broken hearts and tears of deepest grief, watched the eyes of their son, brother and friend close forever.  Early in life the deceased became a member of the Christian Church and was a regular attendant of both the church and Sunday school until a few years since, when he became an attendant of the First Presbyterian Church.  The funeral services will occur from the latter church Tuesday afternoon at one o’clock and will be under the auspices of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias Lodges of the city.  Of the former lodge, Mr. Caughey was a prominent member and had gained a state reputation as such.  He was initiated into the Odd Fellows Lodge, October 19, 1885, and in June 1887, was elected Vice Grand; in January 1888, was elected Noble Grand; in May 1888 he was chosen to represent Shelby Lodge No 39 at the Grand Lodge which met at that time in Indianapolis; and in November, 1890, he was appointed by the state meeting of his Lodge to the office Grand Conductor of the State, which position he filled with credit to himself and the Order.  He filled this office for that year and would have been promoted higher honors had his health permitted.  At the time of his death he was Captain of the Degree Staff of Shelby Lodge No. 39, which under his management, has reached more than a State reputation.  The work laid down by the deceased in the Degree Staff will be taken up by  Mr. Jacob H. Deitzer.  Mr. Caughey was also an honored member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of this city, becoming a Page in that order on the evening of July 7, 1888, and an Esquire on the evening of July 24, and a Knight on the evening of July 31, same year.  He carried no life insurance in the I.O.O.F. Lodge.  He also was a member of the Daughters of Rebekah and Pythian Sisters.
          No one ever criticized the sincerity of James T. Caughey.  In the last few years of his life, he became a leader in odd fellowship.  He was a worshipper of its teachings and earnestly worked in the interest of the brotherhood.  In the lodge, he was ever found the champion of right and his love for charity often led him to error on the side of mercy in favor of the oppressed.  While able to work he led the degree team to almost national distinction, and gave the lodge an impetus it had not enjoyed in many years.  The same manly, emulating deportment marked his business course and daily walk that endeared him to his fellowships.  Always kind, pleasant and agreeable, and with rich words of encouragement for those in distress.  He was in love with his work, both as an editor and Odd fellow, and had ability, which assured him success in life, had he lived yet a little while.  He had an exalted opinion of journalism and sought to maintain that dignity, which he believed was due.  We know that it is customary to heap encomiums upon the dead, and often seek to hide what of faults the person may have possessed while living, but the  Democrat  in this instance is sincere in what it says of Mr. Caughey.  The proprietor of this paper has often spoken in high terms of him while living, and he has always had a warm place in his heart for James T. Caughey.  Speaking for ourselves and for all who knew the deceased and his family, we extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved, his loving mother and only sister.  We take the following sketch of Mr. Caughey’s life from the "History of Shelby County," up to the years 1887.
          "James T. Caughey, city editor of the Republican, is a native of New Paris, Ohio, born February 2, 1861. His father was George W. Caughey, born Preble county, Ohio, September 17, 1831, and died in Shelbyville, Ind. November 11, 1883.  He was by occupation a merchant tailor, and carried on that business in this city for quite a number of years.  The paternal grandfather of the subject here considered, was John Caughey, a native of one of the eastern states.  The family first settled in Ohio, and in 1871, came to Shelbyville.  The mother of our subject is Mrs. Sarah Caughey, born August 31, 1833, and whose maiden name was Johnson.  Mr. Caughey is the younger of two living children.  He was a student in the common schools in New Paris, Ohio, and coming to Shelbyville, entered the public school and graduated from the High school in this city in 1879.  Subsequent to his graduation, he entered the law office of  Adams & Michener, and there remained several years.  In 1885 he became city editor of the Shelbyville Republican, and his success as a newspaper man is unquestioned.  The prosperity of the  Republican  is in a great measure due to the energy and untiring efforts of Mr. Caughey.  In politics, he was a pronounced republican, and in 1885, was a candidate on the republican ticket for City Clerk, and owing to a slight difference in his own party, was defeated by twelve votes cast in favor of Charles Major.  In 1885, he became a member of the I.O.O.F. He was a leading, active member of the order, and now holds the position of Vice Grand.  Mr. Caughey was a prominent and highly respected young man, and a firm friend of the republican party and of education.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Thursday February 12, 1885
Page 4 column 3
----------
DEATH  OF  CHARLEY  CAUGHEY
----------
          At 10:30 o’clock this morning, Charley Caughey, after a long illness died of consumption.  The deceased was born in New Paris, Preble county, Ohio, December 17, 1855.  He was a young man of many noble qualities, and had but few, if any, enemies.  The funeral will take place next Saturday at 2 o’clock, from the residence.  The services will be conducted by Rev. Edwards, assisted by Rev. Hughes.  The deceased was a member of the Christian church.
-----------

The  Daily  Republican
Thursday February 12, 1885
Page 4 column 2
----------
          Charley Caughey died this morning about 10:35 at the residence of his mother on the corner of Jackson and Tompkins streets.  His disease was consumption, from the fatal effects of which he has been a helpless invalid for many sad and weary months.  Charley was about twenty-nine years old at the time of his death and was a son of the late  George Caughey and a brother of  James T. Caughey, the young attorney.  It may be truthfully said of our departed friend that Shelbyville never had as a citizen, a more popular or worthy young man than Charley Caughey.  He was always gentlemanly, polite, good-humored and ready to oblige friends.  He possessed fine natural sense and a most excellent address, which would have insured him business prosperity but for the complete breakdown of his health several years ago while he was residing in Iowa.  In the death of her son, the mother and other relatives have the sympathy of a circle as wide as Charley’s acquaintance, for he had not an enemy in the world.  The funeral will take place from the residence on the corner of Jackson and Tompkins streets, at 2 o’clock on Saturday afternoon, and the interment will be in the City cemetery. Rev. J. H. Edwards of the Christian church will officiate, assisted by Rev. T. L. Hughes, of the Presbyterian church.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Daily  Evening  Democrat
Monday November 12, 1883
Page 4 column 3
----------
DIED
----------
          CAUGHEY----At his residence in this city, on Sunday, November 11, 1883, at ten o’clock p.m., George W. Caughey.  Cause of death typhoid pneumonia.  Mr. Caughey was born in Preble county, Ohio, on September 17, 1831, and became a resident of this city about twelve years ago.  The funeral will take place at his late residence on the corner of Jackson and Tompkins streets, at two o’clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. S. J. Tomlinson, officiating.  His bereaved family have the sympathy of all in their affliction.
Contributed by Barb Huff

Obituary Index       Main Page

To contact the researcher listed above, use the  Surname Index.