Shelby  County  Indiana
Obituaries

Cummings / Cummins

The  Shelbyville  News
October 16, 1987
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          Helen Mae Cummings,  79, .
          .
          .
          .
Contributed  by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday August 18, 1932
Page 4 column 3
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DEATH  CLAIMS  AGED  RESIDENT
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Harry L. Cummins Succumbs Early this Morning
At Age Of Eighty-One Years
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HOLD  FUNERAL  SATURDAY
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          A complication of diseases due to his advanced age, proved fatal early this morning for  Harry L. Cummins, residing at the county farm, and formerly of this city.
          Mr. Cummins was the son of  Joseph and  Eliza (Moore) Cummins of this city.  He was born December 22, 1851, having been at the time of his death 81 years of age.  He was united in marriage to  Lucille Coats  of this city.  She preceded him in death.
          At one time Mr. Cummins was associated in the undertaking business with his father whose mortuary was located in the second block of East Washington street.  Later he worked as nightman in the office of the Stewart & Fix undertaking establishment.  This position he held for 17 years.  For 3 years Mr. Cummins was associated wit the present firm of C. F. Fix and Son, morticians.
          Under  Thomas Newton, and  Oscar Lewis, former postmasters of this city, Mr. Cummins was employed for 25 years as a railroad clerk.
          The only surviving relatives are nieces and nephews whose whereabouts are unknown.
          Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at ten o’clock at the C. F. Fix and Son mortuary on East Broadway, Dr. L. T. Freeland, pastor of the First Methodist Church, will be in charge.  Interment will be made in the City cemetery.
Contributed by Barb Huff  for Pat


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Friday September 23, 1927
Page 1 column 4
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DEATH  AT  AGE  OF  101  YEARS
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Mrs. Eliza Cummins Passed Away Thursday
At Home of Her Niece in Waldron
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HOLD  FUNERAL  SATURDAY
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Native of Kentucky Had Made Her Home
in Waldron for A Number of Years
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          Mrs. Eliza Cummins, age 101 years, probably the oldest resident of Shelby county, died Thursday at her home in Waldron.  Her death was caused by senility.  Mrs. Cummins had been in ill health for several months.  Last spring Mrs. Cummins fell at her home and was injured.  She had been unable to walk since that time.
          She was a sister of  Mrs. Minerva Thompson, who died several years ago at her home in Waldron at the age of 103 years and twenty days.  Mrs. Thompson at that time was the oldest resident of Shelby county.  The combined age of the two sisters was 204 years, believed to be a record for longevity among the members of a family.
          Mrs. Cummins had lived in Waldron for many years.  She came there a number of years ago to the home of her sister, the two making their home together for some time.  After the death of Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Cummins lived with her niece, Miss Anna Thompson, who is now more than seventy years of age.
          Mrs. Cummins was a remarkable woman in many ways.  Until she fell last spring and suffered an injury, which prevented her from walking, she was about the house daily, attending to work in the house and in the yard.  She had a keen eyesight until recently and took deep interest in the happenings about her in the world at large.
          She was a native of Kentucky and was born in Mason county, that state, on April 25, 1826.  In 1851 she was married to Daniel Cummins.  One son, Marion, was born to them.  The husband and the son have been dead for many years.  She is survived by two nieces, Miss Ana Thompson, with whom she lived, and  Mrs. A. J. Ensminger, of Waldron, formerly a resident of Shelbyville.
          Short funeral services will be conducted at the home in Waldron, Saturday morning at ten o’clock, the Rev. C. B. Atkinson officiating.  Burial will be made in the Flat Rock cemetery, south of Rushville, R. T. Stewart in charge.
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Shelby County, Indiana Marriages
Daniel Cummins & Eliza Burns
November 23, 1856   Book 7 page 49
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Contributed by Barb Huff  for Pat


The  Shelby  Democrat
Thursday, January 11, 1923
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          John Edward Cummins,  51 years old, well known resident of Brandywine township, died at his home, near Fairland, Saturday evening, at 9:45 o'clock, following an illness of one week, caused from a complication of diseases.
          Short funeral services will be held at the late home Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, after which the body will be taken to the Fairland M. E. church, where services will be held at 2:00 o'clock, the Rev. J. G. Pickett officiating.  Burial will be made in the Fairland cemetery.
          Mr. Cummins, for a number of years had been engaged as a carpenter and was very efficient in this line of work.  He had been in declining helath for some time, but was not confined to his bed until last Monday, when his condition grew much worse, which resulted in his death.
          Mr. Cummins, was known by practically every resident in the Fairland community and had many friends thruout the county who will regret to learn of his death.  He was a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias lodge, No. 425, of Fairland, and also of the Pythian Sisters lodge.  He was also a member of the Brandywine M. E. church.
          Besides the bereaved widow,  Mrs. Flora Cummins,  he leaves two daughters,  Mrs. Goldie Nightingale,  of Indianapolis;  Mrs. Verlie Hogan,  of St. Louis Crossing, and one son,  Floyd Cummins,  of Indianapolis, and one sister,  Mrs. Linda Mood,  of Fortville.
Contributed by Phyllis Miller Fleming


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Monday January 8, 1923
Page 5 column 2
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JOHN  E. CUMMINS
DIED  SATURDAY
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Death Occurred To Well Known Citizen
Living North of Fairland
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FUNERAL  SERVICES  TUESDAY
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          John E. Cummins, who had been ill for several years suffering from a complication of diseases, died at his home north of Fairland on Saturday night at ten o'clock.  Mr. Cummins was a well known resident of that community and had been in failing health for a number of years. He was 51 years of age.
          Mr. Cummins was a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge and also the Pythian Sisters lodges at Fairland.
          Besides the wife, Mrs. Flora [B. Jordan] Cummins, the deceased leaves two daughters and one son, Mrs. Verlie Hogan, of St. Louis Crossing, Mrs. Goldie Nightingale, of Indianapolis and  Floyd Cummins, at home.  Also two brothers  Sam  and  Will Cummins  of Indianapolis, and one sister of Fortville.
          Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, the Rev. S. G. Pickett, officiating.  Interment will be made in the Fairland cemetery.  The Knights of Pythias lodge is in charge.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Republican
Thursday March 16, 1922
Page 1 column 5
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WALDRON  WOMAN  CALLED  BY  DEATH
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Mrs. Barbara Ellen Cummins Died At
Home of Daughter, Mrs. H. A. Washburn
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FUNERAL  AT  McCORDSVILLE
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          Mrs. Barbara Ellen Cummins, an aged and highly respected woman, died at the home of  Dr. and Mrs. H. A. Washburn, in Waldron, this morning at six o’clock. Death was caused from a complication of diseases.  Mrs. Cummins had made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Washburn  for several months.  She was born near Pendleton, on May 22, 1838 and passed away at the age of 83 years, nine months and 26 days.
          Mrs. Cummins was married to  William B. Cummins, on February 27, 1856 and to this union were born eleven children, seven of whom survive.  Four sons, Orville, of Fortville, Indiana;  C. J. Cummins  and  C. E. Cummins, of High Point, North Carolina; and  Samuel, of Newcastle.  Three daughters, Mrs. Hattie Luse, of Indianapolis;  Mrs. Ida Brooks, of Fortville, Indiana, besides Mrs. Washburn, at Waldron.  She also leaves eleven grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.
          She was a member of the Methodist church and has always lives a devout Christian life.  Having made all of her funeral arrangements prior to her death.  Short services will be held at the Washburn home in Waldron Saturday morning at 7:45 o’clock, when the remains will be removed to McCordsville, Indiana.  Services there will be conducted from the M.E. church, the rev. R. O. Pearson officiating.  Interment will be made in the McCordsville cemetery with Charles M. Ewing, of this city, in charge.
          Friends may call at the Washburn home in Waldron from 1 o’clock Friday afternoon until the hour of the funeral Saturday morning.
Contributed by Barb Huff  for Pat


The  Semi-Weekly  Republican
Friday February 21, 1896
Page 4 column 1
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          Mrs. Eliza Cummins, widow of the late  Joseph Cummins, died at her home on East Washington street, in this city, Tuesday, twenty minutes before five o'clock.  Mrs. Cummins' maiden name was  Moore  and she was born in Liberty township on June 9, 1828.  She was married to Mr. Cummins on March 20, 1845, and together they celebrated their Golden wedding less than a year ago.  The only children are  Mrs. [Jennie] Webster, of Kansas, and  Harry Cummins, of this city.  Mrs. Cummins was greatly afflicted for a number of years and was seldom out of her home.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Semi-Weekly  Republican
Tuesday December 24, 1895
Page 2 column 4
PASSED AWAY
Joseph Cummins, An Old Resident Dead
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          Thursday noon when  Mr. Joseph Cummins  went to the dinner table he drunk about a half cup of coffee and getting up said he did not care for anything more.  Going out of the house the back way he reached Jackson street, then he went to Pike street, reaching the drug store of  Ed Jenkins  by that route.  He went along the street at a rapid pace and when he reached Jenkin's store he purchased 100 tablets of morphia, each containing a half a grain of the drug.  A short time later after this he went to the saloon of  Joe Laws, on Jackson street, where at one time with the exception of perhaps of a half dozen he swallowed all the tablets.  Those that he did not take he dropped on the floor.  After doing this he took a piece of paper from his pocket and commenced to write a letter to his wife but got no farther than this: 

                    My darling wife - My darling Eliza - Call someone -

          From Mr. Law's saloon he went to the Gatewood House where after a long search he was found in the evening by  Robert Stewart, who took him to his home of east Washington street.  No one knew at that time what he had done and at six o'clock, when Dr. Drake was called to see him there were no symptoms of morphine poisoning.  Mr. Cummins said he did not want a physician as he knew what he was doing.  He was in a jolly, good humor during the evening and it was not until about 10 o'clock that he grew sick.  The full effect of the drug was manifest then and by the time the Dr. could reach him he was past all earthly aid.  At twenty minutes before 6 o'clock Friday morning Mr. Cummins passed away.  During the past week Mr. Cummins has written several letters, one of which was addressed to Mr. Stewart which directions were given for his funeral.  The others were concerning his business matters.  There seems but little doubt that "Uncle" Joe took the overdose of morphia intentionally as several times recently he had made strong hints he would do so.  His death removes from our city one of the very few remaining early pioneers and a man who was perhaps more extensively acquainted with our people than any other man in the county.
          He was born in Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio, April 7, 1820.  When a mere boy he enlisted with General Sam Houston  in the war for the suppression of the revolution in Texas.  Soon after that war was over Mr. Cummins moved near Old Middletown, in this county, where, on the 20th day of March 1845 he was married to  Miss Eliza Moore.  To them six children were born, only two of whom are now living, they being  Mrs. Jennie Webster, of Kansas, and  Harry C. of this city.  On the 20th day of last March, Mr. and Mrs. Cummins celebrated their Golden wedding at their home by inviting to a dinner a few of their near neighbors.  In addition to the three members of his family, Mr. Cummins leaves a brother, Mr. William Cummins, of Cincinnati, and a sister, Mrs. Lydia Dewitt, of this city.  Since coming to Shelbyville Mr. Cummins has been engaged constantly in the undertaking business, at the time of his death being the senior member of the firm of Cummins & Edwards.  He was one of the first members of Shelby Lodge No. 39, I.O.O.F., and was a member of the Shelby Lodge, No. 28, F. & A.M., in 1847.  He was not a veteran of the Mexican war as many suppose.  In many respects Uncle Joe was a man of fine qualities and his death will be deeply lamented for many people.
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Page 4 column 3
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          The funeral of Joseph Cummins were held at his late residence, No. 77 east Washington street, at 2 p.m. Sunday December 22, Rev. J.R.T. Lathrop officiating.  Interment in the City cemetery under the auspices of Shelby Lodge No 28, F. and A.M., and Shelby Lodge No. 39, I.O.O.F.  The casket was open at the house from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday.  Funeral private.
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Page 4 column 4
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          Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Webster  are here from Severy, Kansas, and will remain an indefinite time.  Mrs. Webster is a daughter of the late Joseph Cummins.
Contributed by Barb Huff

The  Shelby  Democrat  Volunteer
Thursday May 13, 1880
Page 3 column 1
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          Joseph Cummins, Sr., of Waldron, died Friday night at 9 o'clock at his residence in that town.  The funeral will take place at 2 o'clock tomorrow.  The funeral sermon will be preached by R.F. Foster, of Indianapolis.
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Volunteer
Thursday October 14, 1875
Page 3 column 3
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          Grandma [Sarah] Cummins  aged 82 years, died at her residence here on Saturday last at 4 o’clock p.m.  She was born in West Moreland County, Pennsylvania, moved to Ohio in 1811 and was married to  Joseph Cummins  in 1813.  For 62 years she walked by the side of her now aged and bereaved companion.  Her character was irreproachable and her life spotless.  Religious services were conducted at the house at 2 o’clock p.m. Sunday by Rev. Dishell, after which a large procession accompanied the remains to the Middletown cemetery.  Rev. B.F. Foster will preach a funeral discourse at a future day of which due notice will be given.
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Middletown Cemetery
Sarah Cummins
September 17, 1793 – October 9, 1875
Contributed by Barb Huff


The  Shelbyville  Weekly  Volunteer
Thursday August 20, 1874
Page 3 column 2
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          A young widowed woman by the name of  Anna Cummins  residing at Wright Smith’s in this city, committed suicide on Friday by taking arsenic the night previous while under a recurring fit of insanity.
Contributed by Barb Huff  for Pat



The  Journal.
Crawfordsville, [IN], Jan. 29, 1874.
T. H. B. McCain and J. T. Talbot
Editors and Proprietors
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OBITUARY
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FREDERICK  PATTERSON  CUMMINS.
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          Died, in this city on Wednesday evening the 21st, the Rev. Frederick Patterson Cummins, rector of St. John's church, in the 61st year of his age.  Under ordinary circumstances, this simple announcement would probably be sufficient. But the sudden and unexpected call upoon this devoted servant of God ______ down the earthly _____ and enter upon his rest was not an ordinary circumstance.  It shocked the community by its suddenness and pained it by the knowledge of a heavy loss.  Mr. Cummins, as successor to the lamented _____ [entire line missing] church by the gentleness of his demeanor, the unaffected piety of his life and the ability of his public ministrations has strongly endeared himself to his parish and to many outside of it in this community, and the memory he leaves behind him --- that of a good man, and a pastor "faithful unto death" --- is one which will not soon be obliterated.
          For some time in fading health, he had felt obliged to resign his charge and _____ [half-line missing] for him better than he knew.  Instead of the temporary release from labor which he sought, and within a few days of the period upon which he had fixed for its commencement, he was translated without pain or prolonged suffering to the blessed rest of Paradise, and now sees the face of Him whom he so long served and truly loved.  He is not for God as taken him.
          Mr. Cummins was born in Louisianna, Dec 31, 1813, graduated at Washington College, Penn., taught school in Burksville, Ky., for three years, thence removed in 1838 to Shelbyville, Indiana.  Here he married Frances Alice, daughter of Hon. John Walker, State Senator, and soon after removed to Laporte, Indiana, where he took orders in the Presbyterian church, and served in that denomination for many years.  About 1862, he united with the congregation of St. Paul's church, Laporte, in which he was confirmed by Bishop Talbot, May 17, 1867, thus becoming a regular communicant of the Episcopal church. Desiring some time later to better the work of the ministry, he was ad___ _____ date for Holy Orders, and on December 2, 1870, was ordained by Bishop Talbot to the Diaconate in St. Mark's church, Lima, and on June 7, 1871, in St. Paul's Cathedral, Indianapolis, to the Priesthood.  St. John's, Crawfordsville, was his first regular charge, and in that parish he continued happy in his ministry and laborious in duty till the Master called him to "come up higher," and he entered upon loftier ministry of praise of which his last public ministrations on earth seemed at once a foretaste and a prophecy.  He leaves a loving family -- a wife, two sons, and four daughters -- to mourn their loss, and to rejoice in his eternal gain.  There is but one text which has constantly pressed upon my mind as proper to be inscribed upon his tomb --- Faithful unto Death.
Contributed by Jean Bischoff


The Miami Visitor
Waynesville, Ohio
Friday, September 26, 1851
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          DIED  in Shelbyville, Indiana, on the 1st of September, 1851,  Mary Cummins,  formerly of this place.
'Farewell, dear mother, thou art done,
'Twas thy Saviour's will to call thee home;
Thy judgment day came to soon,
And it has caused our hearts to mourn.
Though thy grave is far away.
Thy spirit oft doth visit me.
Thy sufferings here are o'er.
Although my sorrows they are sore,
For Death with its cold dart.
Has pierced my dear mother's aching heart.'
                                                  J. A. M.
Contributed anonymously

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